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Colorado State University Global

Academic Catalog

CSU Global Catalog Cover

Colorado State University Global

Academic Catalog

Fall 2024-2025

University policies, degree programs, and course descriptions for undergraduate and graduate students.

The first independent, regionally accredited, 100% online state university in the country.


The Colorado State University Global Campus (CSU Global) Academic Catalog is the official source for academic program information. CSU Global reserves the right to make changes to the catalog in order to fulfill its mission or to accommodate administrative needs in a timely fashion. In the event that such a change is made during the course of a trimester, the catalog will be republished with the alteration clearly indicated. The university will work closely with students to minimize impact should any such change affect their degree progress. For a complete list of student policies, please visit csuglobal.edu/policies.

Effective Date: July 08, 2024

Welcome to CSU Global

Becky Takeda-Tinker, CSU Global President

Dear Students,

Thank you for choosing CSU Global to help you achieve your educational goals for a brighter future. Our mission at CSU Global is to advance student academic and professional success in a global society by providing access to dynamic education characterized by excellence, innovative delivery technologies, industry relevance, and strong stakeholder engagement.

We are committed to your success and preparing you for the workforce through dedicated student success counselors, 24/7 support resources, dedicated career professionals, engaged staff and faculty, and a curriculum focused on in-demand industry skills. As the nation’s first 100% online, fully accredited state university, CSU Global is a trailblazer in meeting the needs of modern learners with high-quality online programs and services.

Our degree programs, specializations, and certificates are designed to ensure you gain the knowledge and skills necessary for you to excel in a changing marketplace. Our faculty members hold top academic credentials and are experts in their field, leveraging recent industry experience and real-world scenarios in the classroom to benefit our students.

Our asynchronous structure, monthly start dates, and accelerated eight-week courses allow for maximum flexibility to work with your schedule and accommodate unforeseen circumstances. In addition, our affordable tuition rates, coupled with opportunities for customized pathways and transfer credits, help reduce your costs and time to completion.

As a nonprofit institution part of the renowned Colorado State University System, CSU Global provides:

  • 24/7 student-centered support, including free tutoring, tech support, extensive library resources, writing center, and career navigation resources.
  • Tuition Guarantee, which ensures your tuition will not increase as long as you are an active student; no student fees; and personalized tuition planning
  • Student scholarship opportunities every trimester, with no limit to the number of scholarships students can receive.

We are proud to have you in the CSU Global community and look forward to helping you reach your goals.

Sincerely,
Dr. Becky Takeda-Tinker
CSU Global President

signature

Degree Programs

Bachelor's Degrees

B.S. in Accounting
B.S. in Business Management
B.S. in Computer Science
B.S. in Criminal Justice
B.S. in Cybersecurity
B.S. in Finance
B.S. in Healthcare Administration and Management
B.S. in Human Resource Management
B.S. in Human Services
B.S. in Information Technology
B.S. in Interdisciplinary Professional Studies
B.S. in Management Information Systems and Business Analytics
B.S. in Marketing
B.S. in Organizational Leadership
B.S. in Project Management

Undergraduate Specializations

Master's Degrees

Master of Business Administration
Master of Business Administration in Product Management
Master of Criminal Justice
Master of Finance
Master of Healthcare Administration
Master of Human Resource Management
Master of Information Technology Management
Master of Interdisciplinary Professional Studies
Master of Professional Accounting
Master of Project Management
M.S. in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning
M.S. in Data Analytics
M.S. in Management
M.S. in Marketing
M.S. in Military and Emergency Responder Psychology
M.S. in Organizational Leadership
M.S. in Teaching and Learning
M.S. in Teaching and Learning - Education Leadership Principal Licensure Concentration

Graduate Specializations

Graduate Specialization for English K-12 Educators
Graduate Specialization for History K-12 Educators
Graduate Specialization for Math K-12 Educators
Accounting
Applied Business Management
Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning
Business Intelligence
Creative and Digital Marketing
Criminal Justice Leadership
Cyber Security
English Language Learning
Finance
Fraud and Financial Crimes
Global Management
Healthcare Administration
Human Resource Management
Human Resources Performance
Information Technology
International Management
Online Learning Innovation and Design
Organizational Leadership and Change Management
Organizational Learning and Performance
Population Health
Project Management
Strategic Innovation and Change Management
Teacher Leadership

Accreditation

Colorado State University Global Campus is regionally accredited by The Higher Learning Commission (HLC).

230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500
Chicago, Illinois 60604
Phone: (800) 621-7440; (312) 263-0456;
Fax: (312) 263-7462

Prior to receiving independent regional accreditation on June 30, 2011, CSU Global operated under extended accreditation from the Colorado State University System campuses of CSU in Fort Collins (graduate degrees) and CSU-Pueblo (undergraduate degrees). Admitted students starting a degree program prior to September 2011 were offered the option to continue their studies under an extended regional accreditation from CSU System campuses. The following indicator noted on the front of the transcript will identify students enrolled under extended accreditation:

  • Colorado State University-Pueblo online baccalaureate degree completion program offered through CSU Global.
  • Colorado State University online master’s degree program offered through CSU Global.

All other students pursue a program of study under the CSU Global’ independent regional accreditation. For questions about transferability, or for further information about the accreditation process, visit the Higher Learning Commission website (http://www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org/).

Select programs from the School of Management and Innovation are also accredited by The Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). These programs include the B.S. in Accounting, B.S. in Business Management, B.S. in Human Resource Management, B.S. in Management Information Systems and Business Analytics, B.S. in Marketing, Master of Finance, Master of Human Resource Management, Master of Professional Accounting, M.S. in International Management, and M.S. in Management. More information about ACBSP accreditation can be found at http://www.acbsp.org.

History of Colorado State University Global

Colorado State University Global is the newest institution in the Colorado State University System (CSUS), an established university system with a rich 140-year history that evolved from agrarian roots as a land-grant institution. CSU Global was established on August 24, 2007, by the CSUS Board of Governors with a central goal of meeting the educational needs of adult learners in the State of Colorado and beyond by providing high quality online programs. On May 7, 2008, the CSUS Board of Governors delegated authority to CSU Global to oversee academic, personnel, and financial matters consistent with powers granted to CSU and CSU-Pueblo. Thereafter, CSU Global was legally sanctioned as a third, independent university on March 18, 2009, when Colorado's Governor Ritter signed into law the State of Colorado Senate Bill 09-086 declaring the establishment of CSU Global as an online university that is part of the Colorado State University System.

CSU Global is the first statutorily-defined 100% online public university in the United States. It has a unique focus on the success of adult, nontraditional learners with learning outcomes focused on theory, knowledge, and skills necessary to secure employment and improve job performance. From its first class of nearly 200 students in 2008, CSU Global has now grown to have a student body of over 10,000 students with more than 500 new enrollments admitted each term.

On June 30, 2011, Colorado State University Global Campus was officially granted independent regional accreditation status by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. CSU Global is the first public university in Colorado to receive initial HLC accreditation since 1971, a significant achievement for the university, the CSU System, and online education.

Mission, Vision, and Values

Mission Statement

Colorado State University Global is committed to advancing student academic and professional success in a global society, by providing access to dynamic education characterized by excellence, innovative delivery technologies, industry relevance, and strong stakeholder engagement.

Vision Statement

CSU Global develops professionals for the workforce of the future.

University Values

We continue to thrive and drive our mission forward because we are:

Growth-Minded - We continually learn, seek opportunities for growth, and believe we can do better with effort and persistence.

Dedicated - We provide exceptional service and support to our stakeholders to drive the mission of the university.

Tenacious - We are accountable for getting the job done right, acting thoughtfully and taking responsibility for our commitments and actions, and we thrive on achieving results.

Agile - We are flexible in our thinking, focus on solutions, innovative problem-solving, and overcoming obstacles.

Engaged - We collaborate, communicate, and motivate one another to achieve excellence.

Champions of Integrity - We act ethically, honestly, and respectfully to be trustworthy and reliable towards all stakeholders.

Commitment to Diversity

CSU Global is committed to providing, and has a fundamental responsibility to provide, equal educational opportunities to all individuals with the courage, desire, and dedication to pursue an education and fulfill their aspirations and dreams in a democratic and pluralistic society. CSU Global strives to educate future leaders who will represent diverse perspectives as well as broad cultural experiences.

Equal Employment Opportunity

Colorado State University System is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and complies with all Federal and Colorado State laws, regulations, and executive orders regarding affirmative action requirements. In order to assist the CSU System in meeting its affirmative action responsibilities, ethnic minorities, women, and other protected class members are encouraged to apply and identify themselves.

Nondiscrimination Policy

CSU Global does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, color, religion, national origin, gender, disability, sexual orientation, veteran status, or disability. CSU Global complies with the Civil Rights Act of 1964, related Executive Orders 11246 and 11375, Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 402 of the Vietnam Era Veteran’s Readjustment Act of 1974, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 as amended, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Civil Rights Act of 1991, and all civil rights laws of the state of Colorado. Accordingly, equal opportunity for admission shall be extended to all persons, and CSU Global shall promote equal opportunity and treatment through a positive and continuing affirmative action program. In order to assist CSU Global in meeting its affirmative action responsibilities, ethnic minorities, women, and other protected class members are encouraged to apply and to identify themselves.

Admission of students as well as availability and access to CSU Global programs and activities are made in accordance with policies of nondiscrimination.

Any CSU Global student who encounters acts of discrimination because of age, race, religion, color, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, veteran status, or disability, either on or off campus, is urged to report such an incident to the Office of Student Success. Any person who wishes to discuss a possible discriminatory act without filling out a complaint form is welcome to do so.

Any of the above discriminatory acts can also be the subject of complaints to the Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, as well as to the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and the Colorado Civil Rights Division.

2023-2023 Academic Calendars

Academic Calendar - Burgundy Track 2022-2023ACADEMIC CALENDAR:
BURGUNDY TRACK 2022-2023

+ Download the Calendar

 

 

Academic Calendar - Gold Track 2022-2023ACADEMIC CALENDAR:
GOLD TRACK 2022-2023

+ Download the Calendar

 

 

2023-2024 Academic Calendars

Academic Calendar - Burgundy Track 2023-2024ACADEMIC CALENDAR:
BURGUNDY TRACK 2023-2024

+ Download the Calendar

 

 

Academic Calendar - Gold Track 2023-2024ACADEMIC CALENDAR:
GOLD TRACK 2023-2024

+ Download the Calendar

 

Tuition & Cost Policies

Undergraduate Tuition for 2024-25 School Year

Cost per Credit: $375

Cost per Course: $1,125 (3 credits)

Annual Tuition: $9,000*

Fees: $0


Tuition Cost per Degree:

Estimated with 90 Transfer Credits: $11,250

Estimated with 60 Transfer Credits $22,500

Estimated with 30 Transfer Credits: $33,750


*Annual undergraduate tuition calculated at 24 credits per year.

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Graduate Tuition for 2024-25 School Year

Cost per Credit: $675

Cost per Course: $2,025 (3 credits)

Annual Tuition: $12,150**

Fees: $0


Tuition Cost per Degree:

Standard 30-Credit Program: $20,250

Standard 36-Credit Program: $24,300

Provisional 33-Credit Program: $22,275

Provisional 39-Credit Program: $26,325


**Annual graduate tuition is calculated at 18 credits per year.


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Tuition Rate Policy

Standard tuition rates are set by the CSU Global Governance Council and subject to the requirements established by the CSU System Board of Governors. Individual students are “locked in” to the tuition rate in effect at the time of their enrollment start date, meaning their rates will not change as long as the student remains active at their same degree level. Should an active student change their degree program (i.e., program area or area of study) at the same graduate or undergraduate level, they will continue to pay their previously “locked in” rate while active. Additionally, should an active student move from an undergraduate certificate to or from an undergraduate degree, or, from a graduate certificate to or from a graduate degree, they will pay their previously “locked in” rate as long as they remain active. Non-degree seeking, students who have been withdrawn from the university for any reason, and students who have achieved graduate status who wish to enroll at CSU Global again will pay the prevailing rate at the time of admission and registration less the discounts reflected below. Separately, a student may become eligible for a discount tuition rate at any point they provide acceptable proof of affiliation.

  1. Students who are employed by partner organizations may be offered a discounted tuition rate if we can verify the relationship between the student and a partner organization.
    1. Organizations are required to sign an agreement with CSU-Global in order to be recognized as an affiliate and in order for students to receive the discounted rate.
    2. The organization must have signed the agreement prior to the student’s start date in order for the student to qualify for the discounted tuition rate. 
  2. Since January 18, 2023,  CSU Global has reinstated its discounted rates for military and veteran students and their family members:
    1. Undergraduate level Active-duty United States Military will continue to be eligible for a discounted tuition rate of $250/credit if the student is able to provide proof of active duty service such as a TA Authorization, or Leave and Earnings statement (LES). Undergraduate level Spouses and dependents, 26 years old or younger, of Active-duty military members are also eligible, but must provide a copy of their current Leave and Earnings statement (LES).
    2. Graduate level Active-duty United States Military are eligible for a discounted tuition rate of $450/credit if the student is able to provide proof of active-duty service.
    3. Graduate level Spouses and dependents, 26 years old or younger, of Active-duty military members are eligible for a 10% discounted tuition rate but must provide a copy of their current LES.
    4. Veterans of the United States Military are eligible for a 10% discounted tuition rate if the Veteran is able to provide proof of military status based on a valid certificate of eligibility or DD214 that shows an honorable discharge. Spouses and dependents, 26 years old or younger, of Veterans are also eligible, but must provide a copy of the DD214 that shows an honorable discharge to qualify.
  3. Full-time employees, spouses, and eligible dependents of Colorado State University-Global Campus, the Colorado State University System Office, Colorado State University in Fort Collins, and Colorado State University-Pueblo Campus qualify for the 25% discounted tuition rate. Students will be required to submit the Preferred Tuition Rate Form.
  4. Alumni who receive a degree or certificate and enroll in a new degree or certificate will receive a 10% discounted tuition rate.
  5. Third parties must sign an agreement for partnership with CSU-Global in order for their employees to qualify for discounted rates. Employees of the partners will need to provide proof of affiliation of a partner organization or a valid pay stub to receive discount tuition rates. 1. The following considerations must be taken into account when creating special programs with discounted tuition rates.
    1. Organization recruitment and onboarding: Lower tuition should be aligned with the overall decrease in acquisition cost that the participating organization is able to provide for each student.
    2.  Market conditions required to implement a project may be used to develop the tuition rate.
    3. Mission completion: The tuition rate can be based on the need to engage program participants in order to support CSU- Global mission.

Discounted tuition rates cannot be stacked and students can only qualify for one discounted rate.

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Cost of Attendance Policy

Our cost of attendance is based on the required components established in the Higher Education Act (Sec. 472), and we use the budget parameters established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE) to determine some of the indirect costs associated with our cost of attendance. Since we only offer 100% online degree programs, we do not include transportation as part of our cost of attendance. We review our student population and costs annually to determine if the costs suggested by the CCHE are still considered reasonable allowable costs for our students.

The cost of attendance includes direct costs, which are tuition, books, and estimated loan fees, as well as indirect costs, which include housing, food, and personal expenses. Students that enroll less than half-time for more than one trimester will have a budget that excludes housing and food. For students that are enrolled less than half-time, their budgets will not include a room and board allowance. Further, students that are living on a military base or who receive Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) will not have a housing allowance included in their budget. This applies to students where a member of the household (student, spouse, or parent) is receiving BAH during the academic year. Incarcerated students will only have tuition, books, and fees included in their budgets.

Tuition and books are calculated on a per-credit-hour basis, whereas the other elements (housing, food, personal expenses, and loan fees) are calculated on a per-month basis. Original budgets and packaging are based on the assumption that students would attend the same number of credits per term based on their current registration at the time of packaging. For students that begin a new program or academic year in the middle of a trimester (C or D terms), they will have a budget based on six months of attendance since they would not have the opportunity to attend the first portion of the trimester. The calculation for each component is described below and is followed by a chart of amounts for each element (Figure 1). Students may request a professional judgment if they have special circumstances related to their cost of attendance. Items, such as a need for a computer or childcare costs, may be considered on a case-by-case basis.

  1. Tuition - Tuition is calculated using the actual tuition rate (FSA Handbook, Vol. 3, Chpt 2), prior to any discounts or affiliate tuition rates offered to the student. Actual tuition rates are used for the cost of attendance calculation to encompass the CSU Global lifetime tuition guarantee which ensures more accurate COA calculations year over year. Undergraduate students will be assessed at the current highest tuition rate. For graduate students, varying tuition rates will be assessed depending upon the individual students’ enrollment date.
  2. Books - Book amounts are calculated based on the weighted average cost of the books per course, as listed on the most recently available booklist, divided by the total number of classes that require books. CSU Global encourages students to research alternative methods in obtaining books, which includes purchasing used books, participating in a book rental program, or purchasing the electronic version of books. All of these options are available to students through the current book vendor and bookstore.
  3. Housing, Food, and Personal Expenses - Housing, Food, and Personal Expenses are based on the recommended budget parameters established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE). The components are representative of the average amount for a single student’s expenses. Active military students, spouses, and dependents that receive BAH will have housing excluded from their cost of attendance.
  4. Loan Fees - Loan fees for undergraduate and graduate students were based on the average loan amount borrowed multiplied by the current federal direct loan origination fee.

    For students who are eligible for the Parent or Grad PLUS loans, the actual loan fees associated with the accepted loan amount will be included in the student’s cost of attendance.

  5. Procedures - Student budgets are built into Campus Nexus based on a monthly amount for all elements based on the housing status. The amounts listed as “on campus” refer to the active military budgets that exclude a housing component.

To create a student budget, we review the following items to determine the total budget:

Select the housing status – If a student selected the “On Campus” housing option in the application for admission, we will automatically assume “off campus” since we do not offer on-campus housing. If a student is active in the military, we will use the “On Campus” choice in Campus Nexus as this takes out the housing element.

Determine the number of months in a student's academic year. The number of months expected to attend is based on the first term the student is registered in for the academic year and the student’s registration track.

Registration Track A B C D
Burgundy 8 7 6 N/A
Gold N/A 8 7 6

Determine the number of Credits expected to complete. The number of credits expected to complete is based on the total number of credits the student is registered in for the first trimester at the time the student is being packaged. We assume the student will complete the same number of credits registered for during all of the main terms of the registration track within the academic year. If the student is in their final academic year, the number of credits expected to complete is based on the number of credits required to complete the program. For example, an undergraduate student enrolled full-time in their first term that has earned 108 credits, has a COA built assuming only 18 credits.

Burgundy Gold Calculation
A only B only

credits registered x 4 (terms)

A and B B and C

credits registered x 2 (payment periods)

A, B, and C B, C, and D credits registered x 2 (payment periods)

B only

C only

credits registered x 3 (terms)

B and C C and D

credits registered x 2 (payment periods)

A and C B and D credits registered x 2 (payment periods)
C only D only

credits registered x 3 (terms)

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Admissions Policies

Application Process

Applicants to CSU Global must submit an application and pay the required application fee to be considered for admission. Undergraduate degree-seeking applicants are required to provide the following documents to determine admissibility:

  1. Proof of high school completion
    1. Official high school transcript(s) OR
    2. General Education Development (GED) equivalent OR
    3. Homeschool transcript
      1. Official high school transcript(s) that detail graduation date, courses taken in grades 9-12, grade point average, terms and/or dates of instruction, and credit hours and grades earned, including a key or explanation of the grading scale
      2. Documentation demonstrating the homeschool program is a state-approved program, or a state statute detailing the state’s minimum curriculum requirements for homeschool programs
  2. Applicants must also submit official transcripts from each postsecondary institution they have attended that is accredited by one of CSU Global’s approved institutional accreditors.
  3. Additional documents as needed for specific degree programs or admit statuses

Applicants are expected to have 2 or more years of work experience. The work experience requirement may be fulfilled by full-time or part-time employment, paid or unpaid internships or apprenticeships, or volunteer work. Each applicant must disclose all previous college experience on their application or be subject to delay of admission, loss of credit, rejection of application, and/or cancellation or denial of admission. CSU Global reserves the right to request, access, and review academic history as deemed relevant.

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Applicant Integrity

Applicants who knowingly submit false information including, but not limited to, forged or altered transcripts will be permanently barred from future admission and/or dismissed from the university. The Admissions Committee may review and/or deny admissions to any applicant, including the following:

  • Those who breach student conduct standards
  • Those whose records indicate disciplinary censure or dismissal
  • Those whose records indicate that they were not in good academic standing at prior institutions
  • Those who demonstrate a lack of academic, personal, or technical ability required for success

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Submitting Official Transcripts to CSU Global

Students applying for admission to CSU-Global are responsible for submitting official transcripts from prior institutions attended that are accredited by one of CSU Global’s approved institutional accreditors. “Official” refers to both the transcript type and method of delivery. A transcript is considered official if it is printed on official transcript paper and sent directly from the issuing school to CSU Global in a sealed envelope. Transcripts that have been sent to the student and opened are not considered official.


Many schools participate in electronic transcript exchange; CSU-Global will accept electronic transcripts from approved service providers. CSU Global accepts electronic transcripts from National Student Clearinghouse, Parchment, and other electronic transcript providers. The school from which the transcript will be ordered can supply instructions if any of these services are in use.

All other official transcript submissions should be mailed to:


CSU Global

Attn: Admissions Department

555 17th St., Ste. 1000

Denver, CO 80202

Approved Institutional Accreditors

Approved Institutional Accreditors include U.S. based accrediting organizations that have historically been known as regional accreditors. The comprehensive list includes the following approved organizations:

  1. Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) Western Association of Schools and Colleges
  2. Higher Learning Commission (HLC)
  3. Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE)
  4. New England Commission of Higher Education (NECHE)
  5. Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU)
  6. Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC)
  7. WASC Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC)

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Technical Requirements

By applying for University admission, students are acknowledging that they meet the minimum technical requirements to complete coursework in the 100% online learning environment of CSU Global, including suitable access to a computer with internet connectivity.

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Undergraduate Admissions

An offer of admissions may be granted to high school graduates or applicants with a GED equivalent who:

  1. Meet freshman admission requirements OR
  2. Meet transfer admission requirements OR
  3. Apply for provisional admission OR
  4. Apply for non-degree seeking status.

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Undergraduate First-time Freshman Admission Requirements

First-time freshman applicants must have:

  •  Two or more years of work experience,
  •  Completed less than 24 college-level semester credit hours or 36 college-level quarter credit hours,
  • High school grade point average of 2.80 or higher, or meet minimum GED score requirements below:
    • As a moderately selective university, CSU Global requires all students who apply with a GED to meet the following scores, dependent upon the year the completed their GED:
      • 2014 to Present: 660 for regular admission, 580-659 for provisional admission, 579 and below will not be accepted, does not have high school equivalency.
      • 2002 – 2013: 500 for regular admission, 450-499 for provisional admission, 449 and below will not be accepted and does not have high school equivalency.
      • 1988-2001: 50 for regular admission, 45-49 for provisional admission, 44 and below will not be accepted.
  • Higher Education Admission Recommendations (HEAR) for rigor with minimum high school coursework with a grade of C or higher

Academic Area 2008/2009 2010
English 4 Units 4 Units
Mathematics 3 Units 4 Units
Natural Science 3 Units 3 Units
Social Science 3 Units 3 Units
Foreign Language Not Required 1 Unit
Academic Electives 2 Units 2 Units
TOTAL 15 Units 17 Units

Freshman applicants are not required to submit college entrance exams, but may choose to submit exam scores for consideration. CSU Global minimum entrance exam scores are:

  1. ACT score of 18
  2. SAT score of 980

First-time freshman students cannot register in overlapping terms or enroll in 400 level coursework, nor will they be allowed to self-register. First-time freshman students are required to take the following four courses sequentially in their first four terms, although they can also take an additional 100, 200, or 300 level course at the same time.

  1. ORG100: Navigating Organizations and Change
  2. ENG101: Composition I
  3. HUM101: Critical Reasoning
  4. ENG102: Composition II

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Undergraduate Transfer Admission Requirements

Transfer applicants must have:

  • Two or more years of work experience,
  • A minimum of 24 college-level semester credit hours or 36 college-level quarter credit hours already completed,
  • At least a 2.30 cumulative grade point average from a regionally accredited institution,
  • Good academic standing at the last institution attended

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Undergraduate Provisional Admission

Applicants may apply for provisional admission if they do not meet first-time freshman or transfer admission requirements. Applicants with less than 2 years of work experience, but more than 1 year of work experience, may apply provisionally.


In addition to other application materials, applicants seeking provisional admission must:

  1. Submit a 500-word Statement of Purpose
  2. Submit a professional resume
  3. Complete the SmarterMeasure Assessment

Applicants are strongly encouraged to take their time preparing all materials for consideration. Provisional applications will be reviewed using the Provisional Admission Rubric. Provisional applicants must meet the minimum Provisional Admission Rubric requirements or be recommended for admission by the Admissions Committee to be granted provisional admission. Applicants will be notified of any additional conditions or coursework beyond the standard degree requirements at the time of admission.


To be eligible for full admission, provisionally admitted undergraduate students are required to:

  1. Complete coursework in two consecutive trimesters
  2. Complete 9 credit hours within their first two trimesters
  3. Earn a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher 
  4. Earn a course completion rate of 66.66% or higher 

Students will be notified that they have achieved full admission status when the above conditions are met. If a student does not meet the stipulations outlined in either trimester, they will be denied admission and administratively withdrawn. Students who are administratively withdrawn for not meeting provisional requirements may re-apply after a period of 6 months following their withdrawal date.

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Undergraduate International Admission

International applicants are defined as individuals who either completed their prior education at a foreign (non-English) institution or are non-native English speakers.

Undergraduate applicants who have taken undergraduate course work or earned a bachelor's degree at a non-U.S. institution must have their transcripts reviewed by an approved evaluation service in order to be considered for admission. Official transcript evaluations must be sent directly from the evaluation service to CSU Global. Approved evaluation services are listed at http://www.naces.org. All evaluations must be sent directly to CSU Global from the issuing organization. Photocopied, faxed, or emailed documents will be considered unofficial and will not be accepted.

As a minimum, the evaluation must indicate equivalency to the completion of college level credits from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency as noted in the "Approved Institutional Accreditors" section of the Undergraduate Admissions policy. and include a cumulative GPA.

In addition to meeting standard admissions requirements, international applicants who are non-native English speakers must meet English proficiency requirements.

These students must submit one of the following to be eligible for admission:

  1. The DuoLingo English test, with a minimum score of 90, completed within the last 5 years
  2. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum score of 60 on the Internet exam, 173 on the computer exam, or 60 on the paper exam completed within the last 5 years
  3. The International English Language Testing System (IELTS), including the academic writing and academic reading modules, with a minimum score of 5.0 completed within the last 5 years
  4. An official transcript indicating a grade of C or higher (2.00 on a 4.00 scale) in an English composition course from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency, as noted in the Approved Institutional Accreditor section of the Undergraduate Admissions policy, completed within the last 3 years 
  5. An official transcript indicating that the applicant completed at least 15 credits with a grade of C or higher (2.00 on a 4.00 scale) from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency, as noted in the Approved Institutional Accreditor section of the Undergraduate Admissions policy, within the last 3 years
  6. An official transcript indicating the applicant has passed the U.S. General Education Development (GED) test within the last 5 years
  7. An official transcript indicating completion of an Associate of Arts or an Associate of Science degree from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency as noted in the Approved Institutional Accreditor section of the Undergraduate Admissions policy.
  8. An official transcript showing completion of a baccalaureate or master's level credential from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency, as noted in the Approved Institutional Accreditor section of the Undergraduate Admissions policy, with an overall GPA of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) or higher
  9. An official evaluation showing completion of a high school, baccalaureate, or master's level equivalent to an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency, as noted in the Approved Institutional Accreditor section of the Undergraduate Admissions policy, from an English-speaking country listed on the CIA World Factbook website (https://www.cia.gov/the-world-factbook)

Applicants must arrange to have official score reports sent directly from the testing agency to CSU Global. The TOEFL score recovery code for CSU Global is 8824. Unofficial score photocopies and test scores older than 5 years will not be accepted.

While alternative English proficiency measures may be considered, the DuoLingo English test, Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exams are preferred. Please note that CSU Global is not a certified Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) school so does not participate in the issuing or recertification of student visas.

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Undergraduate Admission Decision Appeals

Applicants who have been denied admission may appeal to the Provost if they believe the Admissions Committee did not fully consider all factors regarding their qualifications. The Provost Admission Decision appeal form and additional documentation demonstrating the capacity for successful degree completion are required to appeal to the Provost. Admission appeals must be received within 30 days of the admission denial notification. The decision of the Provost is final.

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Undergraduate Dual Enrollment

CSU Global at times may admit students who are under the age of 18 years. In most cases, enrollment of minors is limited to existing partnerships with high schools participating in dual enrollment agreements as they have the deeper student relationships and expertise in working with younger students. In certain instances, students who have not graduated from high school and are not served under a standard CSU Global enrollment agreement may be admitted to the university as a non-degree seeking student. Students under the age of 18 who meet application and enrollment requirements, including provisional admission, may be admitted to the university.

Based on its statutory mission, CSU Global provides workplace-relevant academic learning experiences in an environment that has been specifically curated to respect students as independent, mature individuals. CSU Global treats all students equally, irrespective of age. If an exception is made to admit students under the age of 18, CSU Global’s standard advising and academic support arrangements will apply, which include but are not limited to: student success counselors, tutoring, disability services, and career coaching. However, the university acknowledges that anyone under the age of 18 is legally a minor and that some legal restrictions may apply.

Undergraduate Dual Enrollment applicants must meet the following requirements:

     A. Applicants under the age of 18 years old with a high school diploma or equivalent may apply to CSU Global as degree seeking           students. Those who meet application and admission requirements, including provisional admission, may be admitted to the             university.

     B. Applicants under the age of 18 and enrolled in a high school dual enrollment agreement will be admitted as non-degree                   seeking students to CSU Global in accordance with the dual enrollment agreement.

     C. Applicants who are enrolled in high school but have not yet graduated from high school or earned an equivalent and are also             not served under a dual enrollment agreement, may be admitted to the university as a non-degree seeking student upon review and recommendation of the Admissions Committee. Applicants seeking admission prior to graduation from high school and not in a dual-enrollment status must submit proof of attendance in a high school with a GPA of 3.5 or higher, a written statement of intent, parental/legal guardian consent, and a statement of academic readiness from the high school principal or school counselor.  Applicants who are enrolled in an approved home school may submit documentation of approved homeschool status along with a statement of academic readiness from the applicant’s parent, legal guardian, adult designated by the parent, or an otherwise qualified person as defined in Title 22, Colorado Revised Statutes: Education Article 33: School Attendance Law of 1963, Section 104.5.

Admitted students under the age of 18 are required to adhere to all university policies and requirements as published on the university website and in the academic catalog. The university will ensure all communications with students and/or parents/legal guardians follow FERPA as well as local, state, and federal guidelines.

Admitted students under the age of 18 who have not completed high school may not complete more than 15 credits or attempt more than 22 credits total. Students may only enroll in Colorado Guaranteed Transfer Pathway approved courses (gtPathways) while in non-degree seeking status. Non-degree seeking students are not eligible for financial aid.

Applicants seeking admission prior to graduation from high school who are not in dual-enrollment status through their high schools will be required to complete the following documents as a part of their application and admission into the university:

  1. University Application for Admission
  2. AM – Minor Applicant Statement of Intent
  3. AM – Minor Applicant Letter of Recommendation
  4. AM – Minor Applicant proof of high school attendance or home school status plus a GPA of 3.5 or higher
  5. Consent form signed by a parent/legal guardian.

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Graduate Admissions

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Graduate Standard Admission

Applicants are eligible for admission into a graduate program if they have earned a bachelor's degree from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency as noted in this policy. Students may also be eligible if they have a conferred graduate degree from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency as noted in this policy.  An undergraduate or graduate GPA of 3.00 or better (on a 4.00 scale) is preferred. For those applicants with an undergraduate GPA lower than 3.00, a graduate degree (or higher) GPA of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) can also be used for admission. Applicants with an undergraduate GPA below 3.00 may apply for Provisional Admission. Applicants with an undergraduate GPA lower than 3.00 and a graduate GPA lower than a 3.00 may also apply for Provisional Admission.

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Graduate Provisional Admission

If the applicant does not qualify for standard admission, CSU Global may admit an applicant under provisional status if the application meets the minimum rubric requirements and is recommended by the Admissions Committee or Provost. CSU Global reserves the right to access and review academic history as deemed relevant. Each provisional application will be reviewed under the Provisional Admissions Rubric. It is highly recommended applicants take their time preparing all materials for consideration.


Applicants seeking admission with a conferred GPA under a 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) but at or above a 2.3 (on a 4.0 scale) will be considered for provisional admission without further documentation needed. 


Applicants seeking admission with a conferred GPA below a 2.3 (on a 4.0 scale) will need to, in addition to other application materials, also submit:

  • SmarterMeasure Survey Questionnaire
  • SmarterMeasures Skills Assessment

Students admitted provisionally may not begin courses in their first term until all official transcripts and/or the Admit Less Credit Form are on file with the university. The applicant will be notified of any additional conditions or coursework beyond the standard degree requirement prior to enrollment and may be limited to a specific course during their first term. Students who fail to meet the conditions of their provisional admission status will be denied admission and administratively withdrawn. Students who are administratively withdrawn for not meeting provisional requirements may apply for readmission after 30 days following their withdrawal date. All outstanding student account balances must be paid in full and all official transcripts must be on file prior to consideration for re-admission. If re-admissions is approved, financial aid eligibility is reviewed on a case-by-case basis to determine if a student would qualify to receive federal student loans.


Graduate students may be considered for provisional admission if there are positive indicators of graduate success through review of additional documentation (e.g., high GRE or GMAT scores, undergraduate performance in upper-division courses, graduate course success, relevant professional experience, or outstanding professional achievement).


Graduate applicants who do not meet standard admissions requirements or who have content-area deficiencies may be required to complete RES500 Fundamentals of Quantitative Analysis or RES501 Fundamentals of Research and Writing as part of their degree requirements. These courses prepare students to successfully meet the learning objectives of their degree program.


Once provisionally admitted, students must complete two consecutive trimesters.  Students will be required to complete at least three (3) credit hours,  and earn a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or higher and a course completion rate of 66.66% (credits earned/credits attempted) or higher in both the first and second two consecutive trimesters to be eligible for full admission. When the conditions are met, the student will be notified they have achieved full admission status. Students who do not meet the stipulations outlined will be withdrawn at the end of their 2nd consecutive trimester. 


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Graduate International Admission

International applicants are defined as individuals who either completed their prior education at a foreign (non-English) institution or are non-native English speakers. Please note that CSU Global is not a Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) certified school and does not participate in issuing or recertification of student visas.


Graduate applicants who have earned a bachelor's degree at a non-U.S. institution must have their transcripts reviewed by an approved evaluation service in order to be considered for admission. Official transcript evaluations must be sent directly from the evaluation service to CSU Global. Approved evaluation services are listed at http://www.naces.org. Transcripts evaluated by AACRAO (http://www.aacrao.org) are also accepted. As a minimum, the evaluation must indicate equivalency to the completion of a bachelor's degree from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency, as noted in this policy, and include cumulative GPA.


International applicants who choose to complete an international evaluation facilitated by CSU Global through IERF for a fee must submit the following required documentation:


A. All Official transcript(s) issued from the international institution accompanied by a certified translation to CSU Global office of admissions. 

B. High quality color copy of any and all Diplomas, Titles, Certificates, etc., earned


Graduate applicants who have not completed an undergraduate degree from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency as noted in this policy or in one of the English speaking countries listed on the CIA World Factbook website (https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/) must also demonstrate an appropriate level of English language proficiency.


These students must submit one of the following to be eligible for admission:

A. The internet-based or paper-based version of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 60 on the Internet exam, 173 on the computer exam, or 60 on the paper exam is required for admittance.

B. The International English Language Testing System (IELTS), including the academic writing and academic reading modules. A minimum score of 5.0 is required for admittance.

C. An official transcript indicating completion of an Associate of Arts or an Associate of Science degree from  an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency as noted in this policy.

D. An official transcript indicating a grade of C or higher (2.00 on a 4.00 scale) in an English composition course from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency as noted in this policy. The course must be equivalent to U.S college composition and the class must have been completed within the last (2) years.

E. An official transcript indicating the applicant has passed the U.S. General Education Development (GED) test within the last five (5) years.

F. An official transcript showing completion of a baccalaureate or master's level credential from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency as noted in this policy with an overall GPA of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) or higher.


All scores or transcripts must be sent directly to CSU Global directly from the issuing organization. Photocopied, faxed, emailed, or unofficial documents will not be accepted.


In addition to meeting standard admissions requirements, international applicants interested in enrolling in courses at CSU Global must submit documentation of English proficiency. While alternative English proficiency measurements may be considered for provisional admission, the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exams are preferred. Applicants must arrange to have official score reports sent directly from the testing agency to CSU- Global. The TOEFL score recovery code CSU Global is 8824. Unofficial score photocopies and test scores older than two (2) years will not be accepted.


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Non-Degree Seeking

Non-degree seeking (NDS) status is designed for students who wish to complete courses at CSU Global without seeking a degree or conferred certificate. The Global Direct Non-Degree Seeking status allows students to take prerequisite courses for admission to an advanced degree program, a faster route to a bachelor’s degree, or a jumpstart on earning college credit.  All courses taken at CSU Global are credit-bearing and may be eligible for transfer to other institutions, depending on the institutions’ policies. 

To be admitted to CSU Global with Non-Degree Seeking status, applicants must complete the enrollment process. NDS students are not eligible for financial aid and are subject to the same institutional requirements as degree-seeking students. 

Non-Degree seeking students must follow CSU Global’s maximum enrollment policy. Undergraduate NDS students may complete no more than two (2) courses in a term. Graduate NDS students may complete no more than one (1) course in a term. 

Should an NDS-admitted student apply to a degree or certificate program, they must complete a Degree Level Change Request and meet current admission standards and documentation requirements. Please refer to the current academic catalog for admission requirements to undergraduate and graduate degree programs. 

Students are responsible for ensuring the transferability of courses taken at CSU Global to another institution. Students pursuing a degree can enroll in CSU Global Direct and Non-degree seeking courses, which can be counted as elective credits within their degree program, if elective courses are a program requirement.



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Returning Students

Students who have been enrolled at CSU Global and received a grade notation in a course, but whose attendance was interrupted for 1 year or longer, are required to apply for re-entry to the university. Students will not be considered for re-admission unless all account balances have been paid.


Students re-admitted after an absence of 1 year or longer are governed by the policies, courses, and catalog in effect at the time of re-admission and may see a change to their degree plan and/or total earned and transferred credit upon re-entry. Students who submit a catalog appeal upon re-entry understand that an approved catalog appeal only preserves the major and specialization core list of classes required.


Catalog appeals do not preserve transfer or resident-earned credit. Degree seeking students who attended other institutions must provide official transcripts.

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Undergraduate Students

Undergraduate students whose previous CSU Global work resulted in a cumulative GPA below 2.00 and/or course completion rate below 66.66% must also provide a written statement detailing the previous academic difficulties, the student’s plans to overcome those difficulties, and any other pertinent information to assist the admissions committee in making a decision.

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Graduate Students

Graduate students whose previous CSU Global coursework resulted in a GPA below 3.00 and/or course completion rate below 66.66% must also each provide a written statement detailing their previous academic difficulties, their plans to overcome these difficulties, and other pertinent information to assist the admissions committee in making a decision.

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Re-entry Catalog Appeal

Graduate and Undergraduate students may appeal the admission committee to admit them under their previous catalog in order to preserve the major and specialization required courses. Students who have been withdrawn from the university for a period of less than 12 months, and have completed 90 or more credits toward an undergraduate degree or 18 or more credits toward a graduate degree, may be automatically re-admitted under their previous catalog. CSU Global reserves the right to discontinue, or place on teach-out, programs and/or courses without notice. Students may be denied catalog re-entry who have been withdrawn from the university for a period of 12 or more months and have had their program discontinued, or have a significant portion of required coursework discontinued or on teach-out.


Students re-enrolled under an approved catalog appeal or automatic catalog reinstatement are governed by the policies in effect at the time of readmission. Loss of transfer credit or changes in resident credit applicability within the degree plan may change upon official re-entry evaluation.

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Double Major

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Undergraduate Students

CSU Global does not offer the option of a double major for undergraduate students. Students interested in continuing baccalaureate-level education following the completion of their undergraduate degree may wish to consider a second baccalaureate degree.

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Graduate Students

CSU Global does not offer double majors for graduate degrees. Additional majors or specializations will not be awarded or posted to a transcript once the master’s degree has been granted.



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CSU Global Graduation Upgrade

Baccalaureate-seeking seniors who have been reviewed and have received initial approval to graduate from CSU Global may apply for admission into a CSU Global graduate degree program. Graduate Admission policies apply. Students who successfully complete all required undergraduate coursework prior to end of the trimester may be allowed to begin their graduate program earlier; these students should speak with their Student Success Counselors for additional information and restrictions.


Graduate level courses (500 level) cannot be used to satisfy both baccalaureate and graduate degree requirements. CSU Global recommends that students take a break in study of at least one 8-week term prior to pursuing further studies. Tuition guarantee applies only for the current program. Students who complete their program and return for additional courses or degree programs should consult a Student Success Counselor for more information about tuition rates.

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Alumni Admissions Process

Students who have earned a degree from CSU Global and wish to return for a second degree should email Enroll@CSUGlobal.edu for more information about the alumni admission procedure. The application fee is waived for graduates. Baccalaureate graduation candidates seeking to transition into a graduate program should review the CSU Global Graduation Upgrade section. Courses cannot be used to satisfy more than one baccalaureate or graduate degree requirement.


Tuition guarantee applies only for the current program. Students who complete their program and return for additional courses or degree programs should consult an enrollment counselor about alumni tuition rates.

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Second Master’s Degree

Following degree conferral, students who are interested in a second master’s degree should consult their enrollment counselor for more information about the alumni admission procedure. The application fee is waived for CSU Global alumni. Due to course overlap, not all programs are available for this option. Courses cannot be used to satisfy more than one baccalaureate or graduate degree requirement, and a prior graduate degree earned will not reduce the amount of credit required for a graduate level program. Tuition guarantee applies only to the current program. Students who complete their program and return at a later time should consult an enrollment counselor about alumni tuition rates.

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Appeal of Admissions Decision

Applicants who have been denied admission and feel that the Admissions Committee did not fully consider all factors regarding their qualifications may file a Provost Appeal, including the appeal form and documentation, demonstrating capacity for successful degree completion. Admissions appeals must be received within 3 weeks of the admission denial notification. The decision of the Provost is final.

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State-Specific Authorizations

As an institutionally accredited public university that participates in federal financial aid programs, CSU Global works to ensure that it provides students with accurate and complete regulatory information. This includes documenting compliance with the state laws in any states where educational programming is offered as required by the U.S. Department of Education's Program Integrity Rules.

Not all states require state-specific authorizations, and the activities that require authorization vary from state to state. Please direct any questions related to state authorizations to State.Authorizations@CSUGlobal.edu.

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NC-SARA

CSU Global is a participating member in SARA. The State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (SARA) is an agreement among member states, districts, and territories that establishes comparable national standards for interstate offering of postsecondary distance education courses and programs. SARA is overseen by the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (NC-SARA) and administered by four regional education compacts. For the State of Colorado, this is the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE).


Once a state has joined SARA, and then subsequently approves a school or college as a participating institution, a university may offer distance education to students residing in SARA participating states. Approved institutions will have no restrictions on advertising, marketing, program offerings, and with minimal restrictions on clinical practice and internships (no greater than 10 students at one location).


For a list of approved institutions in Colorado, or for a list of currently approved institutions and participating states, see: https://nc-sara.org/directory.


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State Contact Information for Grievances

Students who have not reached a satisfactory resolution upon completion of the institutional grievance process may file a complaint with the appropriate state agency. Please visit the following page for a complete list of state contacts: https://csuglobal.edu/about/our-university/accreditation/state-specific-authorizations.

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Transfer Policies

Undergraduate Transfer Information

The maximum transfer limit for a combination of all sources is 75% of a program or certificate’s credit hours. CSU Global’s Prior Learning Assessment (PLA), Competency-Based Exam (CBE), and Self-Study Assessment (SSAs) credits count toward 75% of credit hours of accepted transfer credits.

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Collegiate Credit

Credit is accepted by CSU Global from institutions that are accredited by approved institutional accrediting agencies as noted in the Approved Institution Accreditors section of the Undergraduate Transfer Credit policy. To be considered in transfer, non-remedial prior college credit must have been completed with a grade equivalent to C- (70%) or higher. CSU Global may accept in transfer approved general education courses from CSU Ft. Collins and CSU Pueblo with grades equivalent to a D ,or higher, towards general education requirements. Credits will be reviewed for transfer to CSU Global upon submission of official transcripts. When making substitutions for courses within the major or specialization, coverage of outcomes should approximate a minimum of 70 percent. CSU Global does not allow transfer of lower division coursework into upper division coursework unless approved by the Provost or his/her designee. Acceptance of credit to be applied toward a major requirement will be determined by faculty.

Transfer grades and credits are not computed within the cumulative grade point average earned at CSU Global.

When transferring coursework that is transcribed in quarter hours, CSU Global will convert this to semester hours of credit. Earned credit for each course will be multiplied by 0.667.

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Acceptance of all P/S grades from Colorado Community Colleges

This policy applies to all applicants with collegiate level credit from state institutions of higher education and is effective April 1, 2020 for all Passing (P) and Satisfactory (S) grades earned during the Spring 2020 and Summer 2020 terms.

  • Colorado State University Global will suspend the requirement that all Passing (P) and Satisfactory (S) grades be indicated on a transcript key as equivalent to a C- (70%) or higher, and may accept all Passing (P) and Satisfactory (S) grades presented by an applicant on an official college transcript.

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Time Limitation of Credit Transfer

Credit earned 10 or more years prior to the date of admission cannot be applied towards major or specialization requirements. However, it may be applied towards the fulfillment of many general education requirements and electives. To ensure student success, the general education areas of written communication and math may not always be fulfilled with credit earned 10 or more years prior to the date of admission; students may be required to take a current written communication and/or math course.

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Credit from Other CSU System Campuses

C.R.S. 23-5-122, "Intra-institutional and intra-system transfers": On or before October 1, 1993, the governing board of every state-supported institution of higher education shall have in place and enforce policies regarding transfers by students between undergraduate degree programs which are offered within the same institution or within the same institutional system. Such policies shall include, but not be limited to, the following provisions:

  • If not more than 10 years prior to transferring into an undergraduate degree program, a student earns credit hours which are required for graduation from such undergraduate degree program, such credit hours shall apply to the completion of such student's graduation requirements from such undergraduate degree program following such transfer.
  • A student who transfers into an undergraduate degree program shall not be required to complete a greater number of credit hours in those courses which are required for graduation from such undergraduate degree program than are required of students who began in such undergraduate degree program, nor shall there be any minimum number of credit hours required post-transfer other than the normal degree requirements for non-transferring students.
  • The grade point average required for a student to apply and be fully considered for transfer into an undergraduate degree program shall be no higher than that which is required for graduation from such undergraduate degree program.

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Two-Year Institutions

CSU Global accepts a maximum of 75% credit hours of lower division credit from an accredited community or junior college. Upper division credit from community or junior colleges will be transferred in up to the maximum of 75% credit hours in combination with all other transfer credit.

Students who have a conferred Bachelor of Applied Science from an accredited community or junior college may have a course by course evaluation completed to determine final transfer credit and applicability. Transfer credits may be subject to the 75% credit transfer limit for lower division coursework. Upper division coursework may be transferred in up to the maximum of 75% semester credit hours in combination with all other transfer credits.

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Associate Degree Information

Students who have completed an A.A. or A.S. degree from a Colorado Community College System institution, including gtPathways general education curriculum with a C- or higher, will transfer with junior standing. Students who have completed an A.A.S. degree from a Colorado Community College will be subject to a transfer credit evaluation of credit and the amount of transfer credit will vary (unless coming from an approved articulation agreement).


Students who have completed an A.A., A.S., A.A.S., or A.G.S. from a Community College outside of the Colorado Community College System will be subject to a course evaluation and the amount of transfer credit will vary.

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Bachelor of Applied Science Degrees

Students with a Bachelor of Applied Science degrees in the areas of technical, practical or industrial art may not be subject to the 75% credit transfer maximum. Students with a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in these areas seeking a second bachelor’s with CSU-Global may have a course by course evaluation completed to determine final transfer credit and applicability.

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Limitation of Physical Education Credit

CSU Global will accept a maximum of 6 physical education credits from accredited institutions.

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International Credit

CSU Global may accept undergraduate or graduate credit that has been earned at non-U.S. institutions if the coursework is consistent in level and content with courses offered at an approved institutionally accredited U.S. institution. Transcripts must be reviewed by an approved evaluation service in order to be considered for transfer. Official transcript evaluations must be sent directly from the evaluation service to CSU Global. Approved evaluation services are listed at http://www.naces.org. Transcripts evaluated by AACRAO (http://www.aacrao.org) are also accepted.


A course by course evaluation is required and must demonstrate a U.S. equivalent to the institution, accreditation, the degree type, and cumulative GPA. All submitted evaluations that do not include a GPA will be reviewed and are subject to provisional admission requirements. All admissions standards apply. Students who would like international courses applied to the major, math, or English composition requirements, must submit a syllabus translated into English by a NACES approved member or AACRAO. Acceptance of credit to be applied toward a major requirement will be determined by faculty.

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Alternative Credit Options

CSU Global makes every effort to provide students with opportunities to earn academic credits that contribute toward supporting student learning and accelerate degree completion. Alternative credit options allow adult learners to demonstrate competency – through a combination of knowledge, prior experiences, and independent learning – in order to decrease cost and time when earning a degree.

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Prior Learning Assessment (PLA)

Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) allows bachelor's level, degree-seeking CSU Global students to demonstrate their prior professional experience to receive credit based on course-equivalent learning.


The CSU Global Prior Learning Assessment Program consists of two parts:

  • PLA Application - Students will submit the application for PLA and CSU Global will internally review eligibility requirements and all necessary documentation. If work experience does not reflect course content and objectives, the student may be denied.
  • Portfolio Project Submission - Students shall create a Portfolio Project for the targeted course(s). There is no guarantee of earned credit for Portfolio Projects submitted for review.
Eligibility

In order to be eligible for the PLA program, students must:

  • Be fully admitted and seeking a bachelor’s degree
  • Be in Good Academic Standing
  • Have completed at least two courses totaling 6 credit hours at CSU Global, with grades of B or higher
  • Have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or higher
  • Not have already attempted or received a grade for the targeted course(s)
  • Have at least 3 years of experience in field related to the targeted course(s)
  • Have submitted a complete application (see below)
Restrictions


A total of 10 courses (30 credits) can be earned in any combination of the following areas:

  • Up to five 3-credit courses in major degree requirements (no more than 50% of total required major courses)
  • Up to three 3-credit courses in specialization degree requirements
  • Up to ten 3-credit courses in elective degree requirements

Additional restrictions are as follows:

  • Only upper-division bachelor’s level CSU Global courses are eligible for the PLA option. Students targeting lower-division coursework are advised to review other options, such as alternative credits like CLEP, DSST, and Straighterline.
  • Students may not seek PLA credit for a course in which credit was accepted in transfer.
  • Developmental, remedial, or self-help courses do not qualify as experiential knowledge.
  • The learning experience integrated into the Portfolio Project must have taken place following the student’s graduation from high school.
  • Credits earned through Portfolio Project reviews are applied as transfer credit.
  • Credits earned through PLA do not meet eligibility for Federal Financial Aid qualification. Credit earned through Portfolio Project review is not term-specific, and therefore may or may not be transcribed on a student’s transcript within a given term.
  • Credit awarded based on Portfolio Project review does not qualify a student for loan deferment.
  • Submission of a Portfolio Project is independent of continuous enrollment guidelines and will not update a student’s attendance.
  • Credits earned through PLA are not guaranteed to transfer to another institution.
  • Students are strongly encouraged to complete their Portfolio Projects within 8 weeks of when permission is granted, as course content is updated regularly. Students have 16 weeks to complete their approved PLA Portfolio Projects.
Applying

To apply for a PLA, contact your Student Success Counselor.


A complete application includes the application form, responses to the questions on the application, and a current resume.


The completed application will be processed within 3 business days of submission.


Applications will be reviewed and scored based on a rubric. Students who do not earn a high enough score to be approved to target a course via PLA may be allowed to submit a revised application to be reviewed a second time. Students may submit an application to complete a course via PLA a maximum of two times.

Submitting Portfolio Projects

Students will have 16 weeks to complete their Portfolio Projects. All Portfolio Projects must be submitted with ample time for review. The latest a Portfolio Project can be submitted is the second-to-last term prior to anticipated graduation. If a Portfolio Project must be submitted in the term the student intends to graduate, the Student Success Counselor should be contacted as quickly as possible.

Grading of Portfolio Submission

If a student receives a grade of at least 70% (C), they will pass with a grade of "S" (Satisfactory). All credit earned through Portfolio review will be listed on the CSU Global transcript and noted with a grade of "TR" (Transfer Credit). Credit earned is listed on the transcript as transfer credit and will not affect the student’s GPA.


The non-refundable $150 Portfolio Project review fee must be paid before each submission will be graded.


In the instance of a failing score ("U"), the Portfolio Project may be resubmitted one time per targeted course for faculty re-review. The second submission will be reviewed by the same instructor who reviewed the first submission. If the work remains unsatisfactory, no record will appear on the CSU Global transcript. Submitting further Portfolio Projects based on that particular course is not permitted.

Additional PLA Reviews

Portfolio Projects may be submitted for completion at any time within the 1 year period once a targeted course has been approved and the student has successfully completed the orientation.


Students must submit one PLA Program Application per course targeted and may be approved to target up to 10 courses. A student may seek approval to submit a Portfolio Project for a course for which they did not initially apply at a later date. In order to do this, the student must contact their Student Success Counselors and complete an additional PLA Program Application.

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Non-Traditional Sources of Credit

CSU Global may accept degree-applicable transfer credit form non-traditional sources of credit. These include Credit by Exam, Prior Learning Assessments, Joint Services Transcripts, and non-collegiate sources of credit. Credit will be reviewed for the transfer to CSU-Global upon submission of official transcripts. CSU Global accepts a maximum of 75% of credit hours from a combination of all non-traditional sources.

Please note: CSU Global has discontinued CBEs effective December 31st, 2018.

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Credit By Exams

Acceptance of credit is based on scores and when the credit was received. Exam credit options include but are not limited to:

Advanced Placement

Students who have taken the Advanced Placement examination may be eligible to receive credit. Credit will be reviewed upon submission of official transcripts.


The CSU Global school code is 6903.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Program

Students who successfully complete the IB program and/or examinations may be eligible to receive credit. Credit will be reviewed upon submission of official transcripts.

CLEP, DSST

CSU Global will accept credit for test scores that meet established benchmarks for the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST). Students must submit an official score report showing they earned scores at or above established benchmarks. CSU Global’s reporting numbers are 3582 for CLEP and 8796 for DSST. CLEP and DSST scores that are documented on a Joint Services Transcript (JST) will be considered official and credit will be awarded based on an official evaluation of the JST. gtPathways-approved CLEP and DSST credit will be reviewed and awarded based on an official evaluation of the transcript.

StraighterLine

CSU Global will accept credit for test scores that meet American Council on Education guideline standards and minimum score requirements on approved examinations. Students must submit an official score report showing they earned scores at or above established American Council on Education benchmarks. Please note that not all tests are accepted and students who are interested should contact their Student Success Counselor for more information. CSU Global's reporting number for StraighterLine is CSUG050.

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Military Credit

CSU Global will accept credits for military service that have been evaluated according to American Council on Education guidelines. Content of credit accepted in transfer may not duplicate coursework previously taken. Military service credit is evaluated when official copies of transcripts for military schools are received.

The evaluation of previous postsecondary education and training is mandatory/required for VA beneficiaries. For students utilizing Veterans benefits who are approved for transfer credit as a result of this evaluation, the institution will grant appropriate credit, reduce the program length proportionately, notify the student and Veterans Affairs in writing of this decision, and adjust invoicing of the VA accordingly.

Army, Navy, Coast Guard, and Marine personnel should submit a Joint Services Transcript. Military Training and Occupational Listings: CSU Global will accept credit from a JST based on an official evaluation for Military American Council on Education approved Training and MOS designations that are gtPathways approved.

Military service credit is evaluated when official copies of transcripts for military schools are received. Courses are evaluated according to the American Council on Education guidelines.

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Non-Collegiate Credit

Non-collegiate credit other than exam or military service credit, such as non-collegiate courses, corporate trainings, certifications, professional licenses, etc., may be reviewed for transfer if it meets the following criteria:

Please note: Certain training and certifications may be considered technical and/or vocational and subject to transfer credit limitations. Additional documentation or requirements of re-certification may need to be met in order for credit to be awarded.

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Non-Acceptance of Credit

Transfer credit will not be accepted for courses that duplicate or significantly overlap each other in content and learning outcomes. Courses which by name, content, or description are developmental, remedial, or preparatory in nature will not be accepted in transfer. This may include courses which have been evaluated by faculty content experts and are found to have learning outcomes that do not match expectations for college level learning.


CSU Global does not accept continuing education courses unless they have been reviewed by ACE, or CSU Global faculty,  or are degree applicable at an approved institutionally  accredited institution.


Portfolio/Prior Learning Assessment/Experiential courses from other institutions are not transferable.


NOTE: Pursuant to § C.R.S. 23-5-145 (2), Prior Learning Assessments for general education credit will be accepted in transfer if taken at a Colorado State Institution of Higher Learning and are gtPathways approved. CSU Global requires original transcripts for review of transfer credit and scores. Grades earned must be equivalent to a C- (70%) or higher and be indicated on the transcript grading key.

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Credit Evaluation Appeals Process

If a student disputes the evaluation of baccalaureate level credit transfer, the student must file a written appeal via email with the Office of the Registrar within 30 days of their degree evaluation being completed. The Office of the Registrar will review the appeal, confer with the appropriate program leader(s), and notify the student in writing of the decision, including the rationale.


If a student disputes the decision, the student may submit a Provost Appeal. The Provost or their designee will review the appeal and notify the student in writing of the decision, including the rationale.


CSU Global abides by the Colorado statewide guaranteed transfer policies. Undergraduate students wishing to further appeal decisions regarding transfer of credit from Colorado public institutions governed by the statewide guaranteed transfer agreement may review information from the gtPathways website for information regarding additional appeal procedures:  https://cdhe.colorado.gov/students/attending-college/credit-transfer. Additional limitations on transfer credits may apply. The maximum transfer limit from a combination of all sources is 90 credits.


Acceptance of credit does not necessarily signify that a program will accept the same credit toward major or specialization requirements. Each program evaluates transfer courses to determine applicability to major and specialization requirements.

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Graduate Transfer Information

A maximum of fifty percent of a program or certificate's credit hours from institutions that are accredited by approved institutional accrediting agencies noted in the Approved Institutional Accreditors section of the Graduate Transfer policy may be transferred and applied to a CSU Global degree, provided that each transferred course has a grade equivalent to B- or higher and that the credits have not been previously applied to the student’s undergraduate degree(s) or to the student's previous conferred master‘s degree(s). Certain limitations when determining transfer credit include origin of the specific credit and accreditation of originating institution are factors when determining transfer of credit. When making substitutions for courses within the major or specialization, coverage of outcomes should approximate at least a minimum of 70 percent.

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Time Limitation of Credit Transfer

Credit earned ten (10) or more years prior to the date of admission will not be transferred unless approved by the Provost (or designee).

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International Credit

CSU-Global may accept graduate credit that has been earned at non-U.S. institutions if the coursework is consistent in level and content with courses offered at approved institutionally accredited U.S. institutions. Transcripts must be reviewed by an approved evaluation service in order to be considered for transfer. Official transcript evaluations must be sent directly from the evaluation service to CSU Global. Approved evaluation services are listed at www.naces.org. Transcripts evaluated by AACRAO (https://www.aacrao.org) are also accepted. A course-by-course evaluation is required and must demonstrate a U.S. equivalent to the institution, accreditation, the degree type, and cumulative GPA. All submitted evaluations that do not include a GPA will be reviewed and are subject to provisional admission requirements. All admissions standards apply. Refer to the University’s Graduate Admission Policy for more details.

Students who would like international courses applied to their graduate coursework must submit a syllabus translated into English by a NACES approved member or AACRAO. Acceptance of credit to be applied toward a graduate degree will be determined by faculty.

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Non-Acceptance of Credit

Certain limitations, to include origin of the specific credit and accreditation of originating institution(s) are factors when determining transfer of credit. Transfer credits will not be accepted for multiple courses that duplicate or significantly overlap each other in content and learning outcomes. Transfer credit for undergraduate coursework may not be applied in a graduate degree or certificate.  When making substitutions for courses within the major or specialization, coverage of outcomes should approximate at least a minimum of 70 percent.  Acceptance of credit to be applied toward a major requirement will involve the appropriate program director (or designee), as appropriate.

Alternative credit, Prior Learning Assessment, Portfolio projects are not allowed in transfer to graduate or certificate programs. Up to 3 credits of Co-operative education courses in combination with all other transfer credit may be accepted in transfer for a graduate or certificate program upon review and approval of Program Chair.


Time Limitation:  Credit earned ten (10) or more years prior to the date of admission will not be transferred unless approved by the Provost (or designee).

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Credit Evaluation Appeals Process

If a student disputes the evaluation of graduate level credit transfer, the student must file a written appeal with the Office of the Registrar. The Office of the Registrar will review the appeal, confer with the appropriate Program Chair, and notify the student in writing of the decision, including the rationale.


If a student disputes the decision, the student may submit a Provost appeal. The Provost or their designee will review the appeal and notify the student in writing of the decision, including the rationale.

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Academic Policies

Catalog Requirements

Students may graduate under the program requirements in the catalog for the term in which they are first enrolled in a course, provided they complete graduation requirements within a continuous period of no more than 10 years. If a student withdraws or is withdrawn for any reason from CSU Global, re-admittance will be governed by the catalog current at the time of re-admission, and may see a change to their degree plan as well as total earned and transferred credit upon re-entry. Students who submit a catalog appeal upon re-entry understand that an approved catalog appeal only preserves the major and specialization core list of classes required. Catalog appeals do not preserve transfer or resident-earned credit. If a student changes their degree program, their catalog will be updated according to university policy. Any exceptions to the policy must have prior approval from the university. Students may also elect to follow any subsequent catalog.


Catalog requirements apply specifically to degree program requirements. CSU Global reserves the right to change, modify, or cancel any course, program, procedure, policy, financial requirement, or disciplinary arrangement set forth in this catalog whenever, in its sole discretion, it determines such action to be appropriate. Updates and changes (SAP, financial aid, etc.) other than degree requirements will apply to all students from the policy’s effective date. Furthermore, CSU Global will not be responsible for any failure to present or complete any course or program or to perform any other activity, function, or obligation mentioned in this catalog.

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Unit of Credit

The unit of credit is the semester hour. Credit earned in an 8-week intensive online course is designed to be equivalent to credit earned in a 16-week, semester-long course. The assignment of semester credit is based on requirements set by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) and corresponds to Carnegie Unit Guidelines. Students should expect to spend a minimum of 10-25 hours per week, per course, engaged in reading, interacting on the discussion boards, writing papers, completing projects, and doing research.

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Change of Program

Students may change their majors (programs of study). All program changes must be made through the Office of the Registrar. Students will receive updated degree plans showing applicability of completed and transfer work to the new degree plan.

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Institutional Degree Requirements

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Undergraduate Requirements

Candidates for the baccalaureate degree must satisfy institutional and general education requirements, as well as specific requirements for their major, as outlined in their official evaluation. Additional institutional requirements are listed below:

  • Students must be admitted without condition to a baccalaureate degree program as a degree seeking student
  • Students must successfully complete a minimum of 120 semester hours of credit with an earned grade point average of 2.00 or higher for all CSU Global credits attempted and included in the GPA computation. Courses numbered below the 100 level cannot be applied toward graduation. Students must successfully complete a minimum of 30 upper-division semester hours of credit
  • Students must satisfactorily complete all general education requirements
  • Students must successfully complete the requirements for an approved program major. Some programs may require completion of a specialization outside the major field
  • Students who have transfer credit applied to a major degree requirement may be required to complete a faculty-approved upper-division substitution
  • Grades of D or lower are not acceptable for meeting baccalaureate level major or specialization requirements
  • A minimum of 30 semester hours of credit must be earned at CSU Global. Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) does not count toward the minimum 30 credit hours earned at CSU Global. This policy may not apply for some students transferring credit from institutions within the CSU System
  • A minimum of 50 percent of major coursework must be completed at CSU Global
  • For degree purposes, CSU Global accepts a maximum of 64 semester hours of lower-division credit from community or junior colleges
  • CSU Global accepts a maximum of 60 credits from a combination of all non-traditional sources
  • Degree candidates must submit an application for graduation. Degrees are conferred within 30 days of the close of each term and only after the student has completed all the degree requirements
  • Additional majors or specializations will not be awarded or posted to a transcript after a baccalaureate degree has been granted
  • Once a degree has been awarded, the student cannot repeat courses in order to improve their grade point average
  • Students must meet all financial obligations to the institution prior to receiving a final transcript or diploma
Major Requirements

A baccalaureate candidate must select a program major and successfully complete all requirements prior to receiving a degree. The minimum number of required semester hours of credit for each program major is 30; some majors may exceed this amount and some courses may require the completion of additional prerequisites.

Specialization Requirements

Students may choose to complete a specialization as part of their baccalaureate degree program. Some programs may require that a specialization be taken in addition to the major coursework.


Undergraduate specializations consist of a sequence of five courses in a specific academic discipline. Not all specializations are available for all baccalaureate degree programs, and some courses may require the completion of additional prerequisites.

General Education Program

The General Education Program at CSU Global provides undergraduate students with the necessary curriculum for state general education requirements in writing and communications, mathematics, arts and humanities, history, social and behavioral sciences, and natural and physical sciences.


The intent of general education courses is to offer students new learning opportunities and to foster untapped interests in addition to meeting state standards. Coursework offers a robust introduction to a variety of disciplines in order to accentuate the more specific coursework in each student's degree program.


This program provides a well-rounded, collegiate educational experience that encourages scholarship and research, personalized assessments, and an integrated approach to instruction that draws on several subjects.


Program Learning Outcomes

• Utilize terminology, assumptions, methods, and technology to become career-ready professionals.
• Solve real-world problems using situational context and logical analysis of relevant, credible, and valid information.
• Produce effective and targeted exchanges of information using appropriate technologies and media.
• Apply ethical standards to complex decision-making.
• Articulate the impact of diverse perspectives needed to collaborate in a global society.


Undergraduate General Education Requirements (31 Credits Total) CSU Global Offerings

Written Communications (6 credits) COM300, COM303, ENG101, and ENG102
Mathematics (3 credits) MTH109, MTH122, MTH156, MTH166, MTH201, MTH350, and MTH410
Arts & Humanities/History/Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits) Choose from Arts & Humanities, History and Social & Behavioral Science courses
Arts & Humanities (6 credits) ENG130, HUM101, and COM200
Social & Behavioral Sciences (3 credits) ECN210, ECN215, POL101, PSY235, SOC101, SOC300, SOC310, COM210, COM215
History (3 credits) HST201, HST202, HST300, and HLS350
Natural & Physical Sciences (7 credits) Choose from Required Laboratory or No Required Lab courses
Course with Required Laboratory (4 credits) BIO121 + BIO121L, BIO200, BIO202, BIO204, CHE101, GEO101C, and PHY101
Lecture Course, No Required Lab (3 credits) BIO121, BIO201, BIO216 and GES120

(Upper-division courses cannot be used for both general education and major credit)

gtPathways Guaranteed Transfer

CSU Global follows the gtPathways general education course requirements as required by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education Performance Contracts and Statewide Transfer Policies. Students residing in states other than Colorado may be required to take additional general education credits to meet their state’s general education requirements.


gtPathways is a set of general education courses that the state guarantees for transfer within public institutions in Colorado. The curriculum consists of 31 semester hours of credit in six content areas. Receiving institutions must apply guaranteed general education courses to a student's general education or major requirements. Approved courses in gtPathways are not based on course equivalencies but meet content and competency criteria.


The following CSU Global courses have been approved for gtPathways Guaranteed Transfer. For more information, visit: https://cdhe.colorado.gov/guaranteed-transfer-gt-pathways-general-education-curriculum-0.

General Education Requirements CSU Global Offerings Accepted Colorado gtPathways
GT-AH2 Introduction to Literature ENG130
GT-AH3 Critical Reasoning HUM101
GT-CO1 Composition I ENG101
GT-CO2 Composition II ENG102
GT-CO3 Professional Communication COM303
GT-HI1 U.S. History I HST201
GT-HI1 U.S. History II HST202
GT-MA1 Mathematical Explorations MTH109
GT-MA1 College Algebra MTH122
GT-MA1 Introduction to Statistics MTH156
GT-SC1 Environmental Conservation Lab BIO121L
GT-SC1 Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab BIO202
GT-SC1 Introduction to Microbiology with Lab BIO204
GT-SC1 Introduction to Chemistry with Lab CHE101
GT-SC1 Earth Science with Lab GEO101C
GT-SC1 Introduction to Physics with Lab PHY101
GT-SC2 Environmental Conservation BIO121
GT-SC2 Public Health and the Environment BIO201
GT-SC2 Water Sustainability in the Western U.S. GES120
GT-SS1 Introduction to Political Science POL101
GT-SS1 Microeconomic Principles ECN210
GT-SS1 Macroeconomic Principles ECN215
GT-SS3 Human Growth and Development PSY235
GT-SS3 Introduction to Sociology SOC101

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Course Substitutions/Waivers

Program Directors may approve a course substitution request for a student as long as they can demonstrate that the program learning outcomes and degree requirements will be met. The following limits will be applied:

  • Students must be in good academic standing to request a substitution (e.g. Undergraduate 2.0 GPA or higher, Graduate 3.0 GPA or higher, not a Provisional Admission).
  • Students enrolled in a Master’s program may request to substitute out a maximum of three courses or 9 credits total from core degree and/or any declared specialization.
  • Students enrolled in a Graduate Certificate program may request to substitute out a maximum of one course or 3 credits from their certificate program.
  • Students enrolled in a Bachelor’s program may request to substitute out a maximum of five courses or 15 credits total from core degree and/or any declared specialization(s).
  • Students enrolled in an Undergraduate Certificate program may request to substitute out a maximum of two courses or 6 credits from their certificate program.

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Graduate Requirements


Each graduate program at CSU Global has specific graduation requirements that must be met prior to graduation. Most graduate degree programs consist of 8 core courses and 4 specialization courses, for a total of 12 courses. Each CSU Global graduate course is three credits.


Students must fulfill the following requirements for a graduate degree:

  • Students must be admitted without condition to a graduate degree program as a degree-seeking student.
  • Students must successfully complete a minimum of 36 semester hours of credit, for most graduate programs, with an earned grade point average of 3.00 or higher for all CSU Global hours attempted and included in the GPA computation. Some graduate programs may require fewer or more credits, and students should refer to the Academic Programs section of the catalog for specific degree requirements. Courses numbered below the 500 level cannot be applied toward graduation.
  • A maximum of 6 semester hours of credit with the grade of C+ or C may apply toward graduation. No courses with a grade lower than C may be applied toward program requirements. Students should refer to the policy on repeating courses for academic credit for more information.
  • A maximum of 9 semester credits of transfer coursework may be applied to the degree.
  • Additional majors or specializations will not be awarded or posted to a transcript after a master’s degree has been granted.
  • Graduate students are expected to complete their degree within 10 years of admission. Courses completed 10 or more years before the date of graduation, either at CSU Global or at another institution, will not be accepted as satisfying graduation requirements without the approval of the Provost or their designee.
Major Requirements

A master’s degree candidate must select a program major and successfully complete all requirements prior to receiving a degree, including prerequisite coursework. The minimum number of required semester hours of credit for each program major is 30-36, which may include a concentration, specialization, or other degree program option in addition to coursework within the major.

Specialization Requirements

Some graduate-level programs may contain the requirement of a specialization as part of their graduate degree program. Specializations consist of a sequence of 4 courses in a specific academic discipline. Not all specializations are available for all graduate degree programs and may require prerequisite courses. Students should refer to their individual degree plan for course requirements.

ACBSP Accredited Program Requirements

Some business-related graduate programs carry unique degree requirements, in addition to the aforementioned requirements. These programs are Master of Finance, Master of Human Resource Management, MS in Management, and Master of Professional Accounting. Students entering these programs should have sufficient background in core business areas to be successful.


Incoming students who do not have an undergraduate or graduate business-related degree from an ACBSP-accredited program are required to take BUS500 - Foundations of Business as a prerequisite. Students who have successfully completed a similar ACBSP prerequisite course or program at another institution will not be required to take BUS500. To determine if the requirement can be waived, the undergraduate business program will be reviewed for equivalency, in accordance with CSU Global transfer policies.

Students offered provisional admittance to these programs, who have not completed a prior degree from an accredited business program, will complete BUS500, rather than RES500 or RES501. Students offered provisional admittance to these programs, who have completed a prior degree from an accredited business program, will complete RES500 or RES501, rather than BUS500.


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Learning Outcomes

CSU Global uses learning outcomes to define the knowledge and abilities that undergraduate and graduate students will achieve upon completion of a program of study. Learning outcomes exist at the program, course, and module level.

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Learning Outcome Assessments

CSU Global continually measures and documents student learning of defined target program outcomes and established learning expectations. This process includes the collection of student learning data, which is aligned with programmatic outcomes, plus an improvement phase that utilizes these results to enhance student learning as well as the teaching and learning environment. Assessing outcomes supports student learning and the university’s continuous improvement efforts.

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Bachelor's Degrees

CSU Global offers 15 undergraduate programs, which lead to Bachelor of Science degrees:

  • B.S. in Accounting
  • B.S. in Business Management
  • B.S. in Computer Science
  • B.S. in Criminal Justice
  • B.S. in Cybersecurity
  • B.S. in Finance
  • B.S. in Healthcare Administration and Management
  • B.S. in Human Resource Management
  • B.S. in Human Services
  • B.S. in Information Technology
  • B.S. in Interdisciplinary Professional Studies
  • B.S. in Management Information Systems and Business Analytics
  • B.S. in Marketing
  • B.S. in Organizational Leadership
  • B.S. in Project Management

Bachelor of Science in Accounting

Students in the Bachelor of Science in Accounting (BSACT) will receive the accounting fundamentals, analytical skills, and professional capabilities needed to contribute to an organization’s success in an artificial intelligence enhanced accounting environment. Using real-world scenarios, cases, and hands-on practice, students will use automation, business intelligence, and data analytics to identify, analyze, and perform comprehensive accounting tasks and procedures to enable them to compete in the accounting and global business environment. Students will acquire fundamental knowledge in legal compliance, ethics, finance, marketing, leadership, economics, information systems, and quantitative decision-making.


The Bachelor of Science in Accounting students will be ready for careers in private, public, nonprofit, and governmental accounting. Students will be ready to sit for the Certified Management Accountant examination (CMA) and prepared to complete the requirements to sit for the Certified Public Accountant Examination (CPA) at the graduate level. The BSACT is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Apply accounting principles, standards, and practices to analyze data in an environment of artificial intelligence (AI).
  • Collaborate using automation, business intelligence, and data analytics to perform business functions, communicate information, and facilitate workplace solutions.
  • Analyze relevant ethical and regulatory trends affecting domestic and international accounting in the global business environment.
  • Evaluate accounting processes, systems, and financial data to identify opportunities for continuous improvement of business processes and application of business intelligence (BI).
  • Demonstrate accounting and leadership skills using automation, business intelligence, and data analytics.

Specific Admission Requirements

Students in the Bachelor of Science in Accounting Program must have access to a Personal Computer (PC) to work with applications/software required to complete assignments that are not supported on other devices like Apple/ Mac devices.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Accounting program consists of seventeen 3-credit courses, listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • MKG310 - Introduction to Marketing
  • MGT315 - Business Law
  • ACT300 - Principles of Accounting and Analytics
  • ACT325 - Principles of Accounting and Decision Analysis
  • ACT350 - Intermediate Accounting I
  • ACT360 - Intermediate Accounting II
  • FIN300 - Principles of Finance for the Private Sector
  • ACT406 - Business Intelligence in Taxation
  • ACT410 - Government and Non-Profit Accounting
  • COM420 - Strategic Communication of Data Analysis
  • ACT425 - Information Systems for Accounting
  • ACT450 - Auditing
  • ACT460 - Cost Analysis and Automation
  • ACT465 - Forensic Accounting and Business Valuation with Artificial Intelligence
  • ACT470 - Advanced Accounting
  • ACT480 - Capstone: Accounting Research and Analysis

Note: ACT495 - Accounting Practicum is an optional course that will provide students with practical experience in organizations specific to accounting. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Bachelor of Science in Business Management

The Bachelor of Science in Business Management prepares students for the responsibilities of business managers including topics related to ethics, diversity, and global knowledge. Upon completion of the program, students will be able to apply critical analysis in decision-making affecting the fiscal and economic value of an organization, innovate and integrate appropriate creativity tools, and lead at every organizational level. The B.S. in Business Management is accredited by ACBSP.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate effective written communication and analytical skills.
  • Apply management skills in decision-making.
  • Analyze ethical aspects of managerial decision making.
  • Synthesize knowledge of global considerations related to managerial actions.
  • Apply critical thinking skills demonstrating managerial business knowledge.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Business Management program consists of ten 3-credit courses, listed in the suggested order of completion, plus two 3-credit prerequisites, ECN210 – Microeconomic Principles and ECN215 – Macroeconomic Principles.

  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • MGT300 - Principles of Management
  • MGT305 - Introduction to International Business
  • MGT315 - Business Law
  • FIN300 - Principles of Finance for the Private Sector
  • MGT350 - Business Policy and Strategy
  • MGT351 - Organizational Innovation and Change
  • MGT410 - Project Management
  • MGT405 - Management in the Global Economy
  • MGT481 - Capstone: Business Management and Strategy

Note: MGT495 is an optional course that students engage in to gain practical business management experience. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

CSU Global’s Bachelor of Science in Computer Science program (BSCS) provides students with a firm foundation of computing, mathematics, and many other skills required for today’s technology careers. The BSCS program places an emphasis on computing and system development allowing students to benefit from the growing demand for professionals that demonstrate a strong proficiency in system analysis and design.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the program’s student outcomes and to the discipline.
  • An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution.
  • An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs.
  • An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal.
  • An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities.
  • An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  • An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society
  • Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional development.
  • An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.
  • An ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer science theory in the modeling and design of computer-based systems in a way that demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices.
  • An ability to apply design and development principles in the construction of software systems of varying complexity.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science program consists of twenty-one 3-credit courses, listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • MTH166 - Pre-Calculus
  • MTH201 - Calculus I
  • CSC200 - Computer Science Fundamentals
  • CSC205 - Logic and Design
  • ITS320 - Basic Programming
  • CSC300 - Operating Systems and Architecture
  • CSC320 - Programming I
  • MIS350 - Information Systems Analysis and Design
  • CSC372 - Programming II
  • CSC400 - Data Structures and Algorithms
  • CSC405 - Graphics and Visualization
  • CSC410 - Artificial Intelligence
  • CSC450 - Programming III
  • CSC470 - Software Engineering
  • CSC475 - Platform Based Development
  • ITS315 - Introduction to Networks
  • ITS325 - Technology, Ethics, and Global Community
  • ITS410 - Database Management
  • ITS415 - Principles of Cyber Security
  • CSC480 - Capstone: Computer Science

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Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

CSU Global's Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice prepares students to enter exciting careers in law enforcement, public- and private-sector agencies, political science, research, social work, investigations, the military, and many other fields. Studies include the exploration of both traditional and contemporary methods of maintaining the balance between public safety and civil liberties. In addition to gaining knowledge of crime, law, and the justice system, students achieve an understanding of the ethical issues and relevant theories that apply to criminal justice and private sector organizations today. Graduates will gain a deep understanding of the functions and relationship between the police, courts, and corrections components of the criminal justice system. This program also explores many contemporary issues in this field such as technology, analytics, security, white collar crime, forensics, cybercrime, terrorism, and international crime. Depending on career or academic interests, students can choose from five dynamic specializations: Criminology, Criminal Forensics, Criminal Justice Management, Homeland Security, and Emergency Management.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the main components of the criminal justice system.
  • Discuss the theoretical approaches to deviance and crime.
  • Determine how quantitative and qualitative research methods are used in the field of criminal justice.
  • Apply ethical standards in the criminal justice system.
  • Evaluate the balance between crime control strategies and appropriate civil liberties.
  • Describe the needs of victims, offenders, and the affected community.
  • Evaluate technology and its role in today's criminal justice environment.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice program consists of ten 3-credit courses listed in suggested order of completion. Additionally, it is recommended, but not required, that students consider a specialization in either Criminology or Criminal Forensics.

  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • CRJ300 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • CRJ305 - Criminology
  • CRJ310 - Law Enforcement and American Policing
  • CRJ330 - Research Methods for the Criminal Justice Professional
  • CRJ335 - Laws of Evidence
  • CRJ420 - Criminal Justice and the Constitution
  • CRJ425 - Criminal Law
  • CRJ440 - Ethics for the Criminal Justice Professional
  • CRJ480 - Capstone: Application of Criminal Justice Knowledge and Skills

Note: CRJ495 is an optional course that students may select if they currently work in a criminal justice setting. Students will be required to pass a criminal background check, including fingerprinting, prior to taking CRJ495. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Bachelor of Science in Cybersecurity

The Bachelor of Science in Cybersecurity program is designed to prepare individuals for jobs in the growing area of security and intelligence. In this specialized program, students will gain the necessary knowledge of techniques and best practices for developing ethical solutions to enforce systems and network security. Students will have the necessary skills to pursue careers in network security, cybersecurity management, and cybersecurity operations. The curriculum will also prepare students for professional certification exams, such as Certified Cloud Security Professional (CCSP), Systems Security Certified Practitioner (SSCP), Certified Encryption Specialist (EC-Council ECES), Certified Incident Handler (EC-Council ECIH), CompTIA A+, CompTIA Network+, CompTIA Security+, CompTIA Project+, and other relevant Certifications. Students will gain competence in the areas associated with the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (ISC-CISSP) exam.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze a complex computing problem and to apply principles of computing and other relevant disciplines to identify solutions.
  • Design, implement and evaluate a computing-based solution to meet a given set of computing requirements in the context of the program’s discipline.
  • Communicate effectively in a variety of professional contexts.
  • Recognize professional responsibilities and make informed judgments in computing practice based on legal and ethical principles.
  • Function effectively as a member or leader of a team engaged in activities appropriate to the program’s discipline.
  • Apply security principles and practices to maintain operations in the presence of risks and threats.

Specific Admission Requirements

Students should have taken a Discrete Mathematics or equivalent course to ensure a strong understanding of analytical concepts that will be presented.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Cybersecurity consists of sixteen 3-credit courses, in the following the suggested order of completion:

  • MTH350 - Discrete Mathematics
  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • ITS310 - Introduction to Computer-Based Systems (Personal Computing)
  • ITS315 - Introduction to Networks
  • ITS350 - Information Systems and Security
  • ITS360 - Introduction to Cyber Security and Digital Crime
  • ITS405 - Intermediate Networking
  • ITS410 - Database Management
  • ITS411 - Principles of Database Security
  • ITS415 - Principles of Cyber Security
  • ITS425 - Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing
  • ITS446 - Securing Virtual and Cloud Systems
  • ITS455 - Digital Forensics and Investigations
  • ITS460 - Information Security Legal and Ethical Issues
  • ITS462 - Introduction to IT Auditing
  • ITS481 - Cybersecurity Capstone

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Bachelor of Science in Finance

Using a firm grounding in the principles of business and economics, students in the Bachelor of Science in Finance gain an understanding of the core concepts of the field, including investments, corporate finance, and financial markets, and financial management. The program is designed to provide students with a strong understanding of the factors that influence financial decision making and will practice critical thinking skills to solve in-depth financial problems. Students will develop specific knowledge and skills in the areas of financial planning, corporate finance, financial markets, and investment management. The program will offer experience using industry tools to apply financial knowledge in practical applications. Students can choose to focus their studies in either the Corporate Finance or the Certified Financial Planner aligned Financial Planning emphasis.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Apply terminology, theories, concepts, practices and skills specific to the field of finance.
  • Apply financial principals to practical business and personal finance situations.
  • Perform financial analysis using quantitative concepts and techniques.
  • Interpret financial statements and ratios.
  • Examine investment and financial risk.
  • Apply legislation, regulations, and principles of practice to financial scenarios.
  • Communicate professionally through writing and presentations.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Finance program is composed of 24 credit-hours, listed in the suggested order of completion, and one of the required 12-credit emphases (either Corporate Finance or Financial Planning):

  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • ACT301 - Financial Accounting
  • MTH410 - Quantitative Business Analysis
  • COM420 - Strategic Communication of Data Analysis
  • FIN400 - Analyzing Financial Statements
  • FIN310 - Financial Analytics and Modeling
  • FIN440 - Financial Strategy and Forecasting
  • FIN480 - Capstone: Finance

The Bachelor of Finance program offers two emphases. Students should select one emphasis to complete as part of their degree requirements.

Students in this program will take FIN480 or FIN481, depending on their area of emphasis. FIN481 is slated for those students following the Financial Planning Emphasis, whereas FIN480 is slated for those students opting for the Corporate Finance Emphasis.

Corporate Finance

The emphasis in corporate finance will prepare students to serve as corporate financial analysts and for careers in corporate finance. Topics will include principles of corporate finance, working capital, risk management, and corporate finance, and will involve mathematical equations and the use of industry software tools.

Emphasis Outcomes
  • Apply principles of corporate financial management including the interpretation of accounts, corporate governance, investment strategies and issues of risk and return.
  • Evaluate the link between financial decisions, attitudes toward risk, and corporate value through application of financial theory and techniques.
  • Develop a framework for valuation including the valuation of stocks and bonds, evaluation of investment opportunities, and firm valuation.
  • Examine a company's cost of capital and sources of external funding for company operations.

Courses in the Corporate Finance Emphasis include:

  • FIN330 - Corporate Finance
  • FIN332 - Risk Management and Analysis
  • FIN333 - Corporate Valuation
  • FIN375 - Working Capital Management

Financial Planning

The emphasis in financial planning is aligned to the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) designation and includes coursework to prepare for the entrance exam for the CFP and for successful transition into the career of a financial planner. Topics include financial planning, insurance and retirements planning, and personal income tax planning.

Emphasis Outcomes
  • Explain regulations, requirements, standards and protections for professional conduct in financial planning.
  • Create a financial plan incorporating financial planning concepts, strategies, tools, and principles.
  • Explain and recommend appropriate insurance options based on client needs analysis.
  • Describe investment principles and strategies to assist client in portfolio development.
  • Discuss education planning and financing principles.
  • Analyze personal tax implications, consequences, and management techniques.
  • Develop retirement savings and income plan that includes estate planning.

Courses in the Financial Planning Emphasis include:

  • FIN321 - Retirement and Real Estate Planning
  • FIN322 - Personal Income Tax Planning
  • FIN323 - Developing the Financial Plan
  • FIN320 - Introduction to Insurance and Investment Planning

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Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration and Management

Puerto Rico residents (only): This program does not fulfill the territory’s requirement needed to work as a Healthcare Administrator in Puerto Rico.

The Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration and Management builds foundational core-competency skills in management and supervision, industry policy, economics, communication, decision-making, strategic planning, operations, information systems, and finance. Additionally, students gain knowledge and an increased comprehension of systems relating to quality improvement, risk management, managed care, supply chain management, insurance, healthcare regulation, ethics, population health, and other information and practices significant in managing in a multifaceted healthcare environment.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Distinguish between the roles, functions, and impact of an effective healthcare manager.
  • Evaluate existing healthcare management industry practices.
  • Critique areas of healthcare finance, policy, operations management, ethical, and strategic dilemmas.
  • Synthesize the value of healthcare operational leadership.
  • Analyze the impact of population health, information systems and technology trends on healthcare patient outcomes.
  • Summarize practical operations and management knowledge and frameworks to the healthcare environment.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration and Management program consists of fifteen 3-credit courses, listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • HCM310 - Introduction to the U.S. Healthcare System
  • HCM320 - Introduction to Health Policy
  • HCM345 - Health Law and Ethics
  • HCM301 - Accounting and Finance for Healthcare Managers
  • HCM370 - Quality and Risk Management in Healthcare
  • HCM375 - The Economics of Healthcare
  • HCM400 - Managed Care and Health Insurance
  • HRM300 - Principles of Human Resource Management
  • MGT410 - Project Management
  • HCM410 - Healthcare Operations Management
  • HCM430 - Population Health Management
  • HCM450 - Healthcare Information Systems
  • HCM460 - Introduction to Healthcare Strategy
  • HCM481 - Capstone: Healthcare Analysis and Policy Development

Note: HCM495 is an optional course that will provide students with practical experience in management organizations. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Bachelor of Science in Human Resource Management

Through the Bachelor of Science in Human Resource Management, students will gain the fundamental knowledge and competencies needed to succeed in a dynamic and evolving human resources field. Students will learn the concepts, practices, and skills needed to become competent human resource professionals and how to manage effectively, motivate, develop, and grow employees, thereby enhancing organizational growth and advancement. Specific areas of study include human resource management in a diverse global workforce, employment law, talent acquisition, and employee total rewards. Students will gain technological and analytical perspectives in all areas of Human Resource Management. This program aligns with the Society for Human Resource Management’s HR Curriculum Guidebook and Templates, and it is ACBSP accredited.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Assess various human resource-related strategies, programs, and initiatives that can motivate and grow employees.
  • Identify the importance of aligning organizational and HR strategic goals.
  • Create talent acquisition strategies to attract and retain a competitive, successful, globally focused, and diverse workforce.
  • Evaluate national and international laws and regulations that impact employment processes and organizational strategies.
  • Create strategies to build effective workplace policies.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Human Resource Management program consists of ten 3-credit core courses, listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • MGT350 - Business Policy and Strategy
  • HRM300 - Principles of Human Resource Management
  • HRM350 - Compensation and Performance Management
  • HRM470 - Human Resource Management in a Global World
  • HRM435 - Creating a Diverse and Ethical Workforce
  • HRM445 - Labor Relations and Employment Law
  • HRM440 - Recruitment, Selection and Employee Development
  • HRM460 - Organizational Development
  • HRM481 - Capstone: Managing and Leading Human Capital

Note: HRM495 is an optional course that will provide students with practical experience in human resource management. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Bachelor of Science in Human Services

In the Bachelor of Science in Human Services Program, students will gain an understanding of Human Services organizations designed to meet community and social welfare needs among varied populations. Students gain the practical knowledge necessary for assisting others in individual, family, group, organization, and community settings. A degree in Human Services provides students with the knowledge, information, and skills critical to a successful career in Health and Human Services. Applied topics include human development, intervention methods, case management, and human services administration.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Apply critical and effective written communication, ethical standards, and analytical skills needed in the Human Services sector.
  • Interpret the purpose and practical application of Human Services using relevant and current theories and methods.
  • Describe the role and function of Human Services employment in both nonprofit and private organizations.
  • Analyze the role and function of diversity in age, race, class, gender, and sexuality in the field of Human Services.
  • Evaluate ethical, legal, and organizational influences in Human Services careers.
  • Describe intervention and case management skills pertinent to the broad field of Human Services.
  • Assess administrative responsibilities in Human Services organizations in working with fragile populations

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Human Services program consists of fifteen 3-credit courses, listed in the suggested order of completion:

Complete the following:
  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • HSM300 - Introduction to Human Services
  • SOC305 - Digital Technology and Tools for Human Services
  • HSM320 - Human Development
  • SOC310 - Intersections of Race, Class, and Gender
  • HSM350 - Intervention Methods in Human Services
  • SOC300 - Working in Modern Society
  • HSM400 - Crisis Intervention for Human Services Professionals
  • HSM405 - Case Management in Human Services
  • HSM420 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Human Services
  • HSM450 - Human Services Administration
  • SOC460 - Community Development
  • HSM470 - Evaluation of Research and Theory in Human Services
  • HSM476 - Seminar in Human Services
  • HSM480 - Capstone: Human Services

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Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program provides students knowledge, skills and proficiency for current and future information technology jobs and prepares graduates for professional certification exams from organizations such as CompTia, Microsoft, and Amazon. Students will gain fundamental knowledge of information technologies and develop computational strategies to solve complex business problems. Specializations in multiple subject matters in Cybersecurity, Virtualization and Cloud Computing, and Web Application Development are available. Through these students receive enhanced, targeted skills and additional certification preparation. Upon completion of the degree program, students will have a foundational and practical knowledge across the field of information technology.

Note: Students in the IT program are prepared to work with, administer, and operate a variety of operating systems. To be successful in the program, students must have access to a Windows-based operating system and the Microsoft Office Suite.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze a problem and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution.
  • Design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs.
  • Function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities.
  • Communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  • Analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society.
  • Engage in continued professional development
  • Utilize current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.
  • Apply current technical concepts and practices in the core information technologies of human computer interaction, information management, programming, networking, and web systems and technologies.
  • Analyze user needs and take them into account in the selection, creation, evaluation and administration of computer-based systems.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program consists of fifteen 3-credit courses, listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • MTH350 - Discrete Mathematics
  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • ACT301 - Financial Accounting
  • ITS310 - Introduction to Computer-Based Systems (Personal Computing)
  • ITS315 - Introduction to Networks
  • ITS320 - Basic Programming
  • ITS330 - Web Design and Development
  • ITS335 - Human Computer Interaction
  • ITS350 - Information Systems and Security
  • ITS400 - Information Technology Project Management
  • ITS405 - Intermediate Networking
  • ITS410 - Database Management
  • ITS430 - Network Enterprise Solutions
  • ITS480 - Capstone: Information Technology

Note: ITS325, ITS420, and ITS495 are optional courses that will provide students with practical experience in organizations specific to information technology. ITS495 may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Professional Studies

The Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Professional Studies is an individualized program designed to equip students with the knowledge and abilities necessary to effectively and efficiently work in current and future industries that drive local and global economic prosperity. Emphasis is placed on effective communication, quantitative skills, global awareness, social responsibility, technology, critical-thinking skills, business skills, strategic innovation, and a commitment to lifelong learning.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate critical thinking and decision-making skills based on interdisciplinary knowledge.
  • Communicate across disciplines using multiple technologies and media.
  • Integrate the knowledge from a wide variety of disciplines to have a better understanding of the world as a global society.
  • Demonstrate the skills needed for ethical reasoning and problem-solving.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Professional Studies program consists of ten 3-credit courses.

  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • IPS450 - Individualized Learning Portfolio

Note: One approved course listed on the charts below must be taken from each of the following content areas:

  • Communications
  • Quantitative skills
  • Global Awareness
  • Social Responsibility
  • Technology
  • Critical Thinking
  • Business
  • Strategic Innovation

Each course may only fulfill one content area degree requirement. A minimum of four of the eight selected courses must be at the 400 level. Students must select and submit all required courses in their individualized degree plan to the Interdisciplinary Professional Studies Faculty Mentor prior to their initial enrollment. Students wishing to modify their major courses on their individualized degree plan after their initial enrollment should contact their Student Success Counselors to receive additional approval by their Interdisciplinary Professional Studies Program Director.

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Bachelor of Science in Management Information Systems and Business Analytics

Students in the Bachelor of Science in Management Information Systems and Business Analytics are prepared to be organizational leaders through the use of system design, data management, and business analytics. Students will learn to improve decision-making and processes in core business concepts, including management, marketing, and accounting through the use of information systems and data analysis in global contexts. Students will learn the ethical and legal aspects of data and information as this knowledge is critical to all organizations. Technical topics include systems analysis and design, database design, statistics, and data collection and analysis. The accredited online Management Information Systems degree consists of twelve 3-credit major courses as part of the 120 credit-hour bachelor’s degree. Core courses are designed to build practical knowledge and skills to help you advance students' careers.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Apply Ethical and legal principles to information systems.
  • Examine the differences in global business practices related to information systems.
  • Utilize systems analysis to manage complex information systems projects.
  • Design business intelligence solutions to achieve organizational objectives.
  • Analyze complex data to support analytical business decisions.
  • Design relational databases to efficiently collect, store, and manage data.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Management Information Systems and Business Analytics program consists of twelve 3-credit core courses, listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • MIS300 - Information Systems Design and Management
  • MIS350 - Information Systems Analysis and Design
  • MIS370 - Web Analytics
  • MIS380 - Data Visualization I
  • MIS407 - Database Concepts
  • MIS415 - Data Visualization II
  • MIS445 - Statistics in Business Analytics
  • MIS450 - Data Mining
  • MIS455 - Data Ethics
  • MIS470 - Data Science Foundation
  • MIS480 - Capstone: Business Analytics and Information Systems

Note: MIS495 is an optional course that provides students with practical experience in information systems. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Bachelor of Science in Marketing

The Bachelor of Science in Marketing provides fundamental knowledge and skills for the development, promotion, distribution, and sale of products and services. The program focuses on the management and use of research, planning, analysis, consumer communication, business relations, and decision- making techniques including current issues and trends such as digital/social media and integrated marketing. Students learn the effective use of theory, technique, and practical application of product strategy, pricing, distribution, promotion, and marketing research, creativity, and critical thinking, as utilized by global marketing managers and directors. The B.S. in Marketing is additionally accredited by ACBSP, which accredits quality business programs across the globe.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop marketing solutions by employing the appropriate marketing strategy, program, or tool.
  • Identify the impacts of internal and external environmental factors which impact an organization's ability to maintain a competitive marketing advantage.
  • Integrate marketing research, theories, models, and data to estimate current market potential, forecast demand, and identify new markets to meet marketing objectives.
  • Assess software, technologies, and web-based solutions that are changing the marketing field.
  • Apply systems thinking to make marketing decisions that add value to organizational stakeholders.
  • Incorporate ethical decision making principles into marketing decisions.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Marketing program consists of ten 3-credit courses, listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • MKG310 - Introduction to Marketing
  • MKG330 - Consumer Behavior
  • MKG340 - Product and Brand Management
  • MKG350 - Integrated Marketing, Promotions, and Advertising
  • MKG400 - International and Multi-Cultural Marketing
  • MKG420 - Digital Marketing
  • MKG440 - Strategic Marketing
  • MKG470 - Marketing Research
  • MKG480 - Capstone: Marketing Strategy and Execution

Note: MKG495 is an optional course that provides students with practical marketing experience. Each student will work under the direct supervision of a master's-level professional at the organization that serves as practicum site. The purpose of the practicum is for students to apply and integrate what they have learned during their core courses in the Bachelor of Science in Marketing. Students will be required to participate in discussions and assignments for the course while assuming an active role in the workplace, working with professionals involved in projects in a variety of capacities. These professionals may be, for example, upper-level managers, project team members, sponsors, stakeholders, project managers, and/or others engaged in projects to demonstrate program-related knowledge and skills.

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Bachelor of Science in Organizational Leadership

The Bachelor of Science in Organizational Leadership program is designed to provide today’s managers and organization leaders with the foundational understanding of competitive knowledge, skills, and abilities. Courses in this degree-completion program build an understanding of basic management functions, organizational behavior, organizational design and structure, workplace psychology applications, leadership communication skills, policy development, project management, legal issues, and information technology management. Upon the completion of this degree, students will have the knowledge of these leadership and management skills to provide a foundation for operating in today’s global organizations.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate the application of effective communication and research skills.
  • Apply leadership skills to strategic development and change.
  • Identify the ethical behaviors and outcomes of decisions within a professional environment.
  • Develop critical thinking skills for effective analysis in decision-making.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the organizational responsibilities of leaders.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Organizational Leadership program consists of ten 3-credit courses, listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • ORG301 - Leading Organizational Behavior
  • ORG429 - Ethics and Law in Organizations
  • ORG400 - Leading Teams in Organizations
  • ORG430 - Vision and Transformation: Leading Forward
  • ORG420 - Leading Organizational Change
  • ORG405 - Principles and Practices of Effective Leadership
  • ORG423 - Communication Strategies for Leaders
  • ORG470 - Leading Through Conflict Resolution
  • ORG480 - Capstone: Organizational Leadership

Note: ORG495 is an optional course that provides students with practical experience in organizations relevant to their field. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Bachelor of Science in Project Management

In the Bachelor of Science in Project Management program, students will analyze and apply theories and concepts associated with temporary endeavors undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result. The courses emphasize key project management knowledge areas with a more robust focus across project, program, and portfolio management. Students will also learn to apply the soft skills associated with leadership, communication, and team building as they relate to the project management knowledge areas.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Apply management and leadership theories to project, program and portfolio management.
  • Apply effective communication, technology, and research skills.
  • Examine tools and techniques of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, and closing projects.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills for effective analysis and decision making.
  • Demonstrate project management skills that impact quality.
  • Analyze the implications of diversity/culture and managing projects in a global setting.

Courses

The Bachelor of Science in Project Management program consists of twelve 3-credit courses divided into two sets, listed in the suggested order of completion:

Complete the following:
  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • MGT300 - Principles of Management
  • OPS400 - Fundamentals of Operations Management
  • PJM310 - Introduction to Project Management
  • PJM330 - Effective Project Scheduling and Control
  • PJM380 - Project Management Tools
Complete the following:
  • PJM400 - Project Procurement and Contract Management
  • PJM405 - Fundamentals of Agile Methodologies
  • PJM410 - Assessing and Managing Risk
  • PJM440 - Project Quality Management
  • PJM460 - Project Leadership
  • PJM480 - Capstone: Project Management

Note: PJM495, Project Management Practicum, is an optional course that provides students with practical project management experience. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

*MGT410 can be taken in place of PJM310; however, students who take MGT410 should not take PJM310.

*PJM310 and OPS400 can be taken concurrently.

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Undergraduate Certificates

CSU Global offers credentialed undergraduate certificates that may be declared as a single program of study. Students interested in undergraduate certificate programs must meet university requirements for standard or provisional admission. Certificates may be financial-aid eligible. Please contact a Student Success Counselor with any questions regarding these programs.

Undergraduate Certificate in Business Administration

The Undergraduate Certificate in Business Administration is an 18 credit-hour offering, targeting students from a wide variety of disciplines. These courses provide the needed knowledge to gain a foundation in business management across key business management domains, including leadership, management, legal and ethical environment of business, organizational innovation and change, and human resources development. The certificate is a way for students to demonstrate to future employers that they have knowledge of the foundational principles of management. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Apply management skills in decision-making and analysis of the organizational structure.
  • Examine ethical behaviors and legal implications of an organization in social, environmental, and corporate environs.
  • Evaluate the role of a manager in the global economy.
  • Develop critical-thinking skills for analysis in strategic planning and innovation.
  • Explain and apply varied leadership styles and techniques for creating and enhancing organizational competitiveness and career plans.

Courses

  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • MGT300 - Principles of Management
  • MKG310 - Introduction to Marketing
  • MGT315 - Business Law
  • MGT351 - Organizational Innovation and Change
  • HRM300 - Principles of Human Resource Management

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Undergraduate Certificate in Business Administration with Leadership Fundamentals

Students in the Business Administration with Leadership Fundamental certificate program learn about themselves as professionals and plan their next career step from an informed, hands-on perspective. Students first develop skills for success and professional communications that apply to all workplaces, plus begin to develop a leadership style. Students then learn about jobs in business and technology and have opportunities to evaluate their own interests and goals in comparison to the work in different industries. In the Business Administration courses, students learn the needed knowledge to gain a foundation in business management across key business management domains, including leadership, management, legal and ethical environment of business, organizational innovation and change, and human resources development.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Identify individual strengths and interests.
  • Distinguish between various career choices.
  • Explain the alignment between personal interests and business career areas.
  • Summarize the connection between workplace activities and personal success factors.

Courses

  • COM304 - Academic and Career Success
  • ORG100 - Personal Leadership and Academic Success
  • MGT200 - Business and Technology Professional Studies
  • ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
  • MGT300 - Principles of Management
  • MKG310 - Introduction to Marketing
  • MGT315 - Business Law
  • MGT351 - Organizational Innovation and Change
  • HRM300 - Principles of Human Resource Management

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Undergraduate Certificate in Computer Programming

The Undergraduate Certificate in Computer Programming, an 18 credit-hour stand-alone program, is aimed at non-computer science majors who would like to broaden their programming capabilities. Courses cover an entire spectrum of basic programming and software development techniques for analysis, design, and implementation of software applications across various operating systems and platforms. Students interested in these courses should have a firm knowledge of basic computer skills and networking technologies including the ability to grasp and understand new computer/networking concepts that relate to information systems and networking. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Select and apply appropriate software engineering topics and concepts to solve a given business problem.
  • Develop conceptual models to access and update stored information.
  • Design, implement, and analyze algorithms for solving problems using Java.
  • Write software programs that manage resources securely in different operating system environments.
  • Compare and contrast different platform-based development environments.
  • Analyze specific programming language requirements for multiple platforms.

Courses

  • CSC320 - Programming I
  • CSC372 - Programming II
  • CSC400 - Data Structures and Algorithms
  • CSC450 - Programming III
  • CSC470 - Software Engineering
  • CSC475 - Platform Based Development

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Undergraduate Certificate in Computer Programming with Leadership Fundamentals

Students in the Computer Programming with Leadership Fundamental certificate program learn about themselves as professionals and plan their next career step from an informed, hands-on perspective. Students first develop skills for success and professional communications that apply to all workplaces, plus begin to develop a leadership style. Students then learn about jobs in business and technology and have opportunities to evaluate their own interests and goals in comparison to the work in different industries. In the Computer Programming courses, students learn the entire spectrum of basic programming and software development techniques for analysis, design, and implementation of software applications across various operating systems and platforms. Students interested in these courses should have a firm knowledge of basic computer skills and networking technologies including the ability to grasp and understand new computer/networking concepts that relate to information systems and networking.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Select and apply appropriate software engineering topics and concepts to solve a given business problem.
  • Develop conceptual models to access and update stored information.
  • Design, implement, and analyze algorithms for solving problems using Java.
  • Write software programs that manage resources securely in different operating system environments.
  • Compare and contrast different platform-based development environments.
  • Analyze specific programming language requirements for multiple platforms.

Courses

  • COM304 - Academic and Career Success
  • ORG100 - Personal Leadership and Academic Success
  • MGT200 - Business and Technology Professional Studies
  • CSC320 - Programming I
  • CSC372 - Programming II
  • CSC400 - Data Structures and Algorithms
  • CSC450 - Programming III
  • CSC470 - Software Engineering
  • CSC475 - Platform Based Development

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Undergraduate Certificate in Cyber Security

The Undergraduate Certificate in Cyber Security advances IT professionals’ understanding of cyber threats, information assurance, and digital crime investigation, developing their knowledge, skills, and abilities to secure organizational data as information security experts in an information technology- dependent enterprise. Coursework is aligned with some elements of the knowledge base for the CISSP® Certified Information Systems Security Professional. Students interested in these courses should have a firm knowledge of basic computer skills and information security, including the ability to grasp and understand the controls and concepts needed to safeguard organizational data. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate the ability to differentiate between various types of systems security threats that can lead to the loss of a major system security goal.
  • Demonstrate comparative understanding of benefits gained from applying various security measures to enterprise infrastructure.
  • Evaluate the impact of hacker and computer espionage activities on the overall security of the organization.
  • Describe and utilize methods and tools to maintain access to systems during penetration testing.
  • Identify the common attacks on IT networks and explain how the motivations behind them have evolved over time.

Courses

  • ITS315 - Introduction to Networks
  • ITS350 - Information Systems and Security
  • ITS360 - Introduction to Cyber Security and Digital Crime
  • ITS415 - Principles of Cyber Security
  • ITS425 - Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing
  • ITS455 - Digital Forensics and Investigations

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Undergraduate Certificate in Cyber Security with Leadership Fundamentals

Students in the Cyber Security with Leadership Fundamental certificate program learn about themselves as professionals and plan their next career step from an informed, hands-on perspective. Students first develop skills for success and professional communications that apply to all workplaces, plus begin to develop a leadership style. Students then learn about jobs in business and technology and have opportunities to evaluate their own interests and goals in comparison to the work in different industries. The Computer Programming certificate advances IT professionals’ understanding of cyber threats, information assurance, and digital crime investigation, developing their knowledge, skills, and abilities to secure organizational data as information security experts in an information technology dependent enterprise. Coursework is aligned with some elements of the knowledge base for the CISSP® Certified Information Systems Security Professional. Students interested in these courses should have a firm knowledge of basic computer skills and information security, including the ability to grasp and understand the controls and concepts needed to safeguard organizational data.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate the ability to differentiate between various types of systems security threats that can lead to the loss of a major system security goal.
  • Demonstrate comparative understanding of benefits gained from applying various security measures to enterprise infrastructure.
  • Evaluate the impact of hacker and computer espionage activities on the overall security of the organization.
  • Describe and utilize methods and tools to maintain access to systems during penetration testing.
  • Identify the common attacks on IT networks and explain how the motivations behind them have evolved over time.

Courses

  • COM304 - Academic and Career Success
  • ORG100 - Personal Leadership and Academic Success
  • MGT200 - Business and Technology Professional Studies
  • ITS315 - Introduction to Networks
  • ITS350 - Information Systems and Security
  • ITS360 - Introduction to Cyber Security and Digital Crime
  • ITS415 - Principles of Cyber Security
  • ITS425 - Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing
  • ITS455 - Digital Forensics and Investigations

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Undergraduate Certificate in Data Management and Analysis

The Undergraduate Certificate in Data Management and Analysis, an 18 credit-hour stand-alone program, is designed for undergraduate students who are not majoring in MIS and Business Analytics and would like to broaden their skills in data management and analysis. Students will learn the entire spectrum of data analytics and management including database concepts, communication of analytics, statistics, data mining, and Python, SAS, and R programming. Students interested in these courses should have a firm knowledge of basic computing skills including the ability to grasp and understand new data processing and analytics concepts that relate to information systems. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Apply database programming using SQL.
  • Utilize visualization and presentations to communicate the results of analytics.
  • Analyze data using R, SAS, and Python programming.
  • Use statistical analysis in the decision-making process.

Courses

  • ITS320 - Basic Programming
  • MIS407 - Database Concepts
  • MIS445 - Statistics in Business Analytics
  • COM420 - Strategic Communication of Data Analysis
  • MIS450 - Data Mining
  • MIS470 - Data Science Foundation

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Undergraduate Certificate in Data Management and Analysis with Leadership Fundamentals

Students in the Data Management and Analysis with Leadership Fundamental certificate program learn about themselves as professionals and plan their next career step from an informed, hands-on perspective. Students first develop skills for success and professional communications that apply to all workplaces, plus begin to develop a leadership style. Students then learn about jobs in business and technology and have opportunities to evaluate their own interests and goals in comparison to the work in different industries. Students will learn the entire spectrum of data analytics and management including database concepts, communication of analytics, statistics, data mining, and Python, SAS, and R programming. Students interested in these courses should have a firm knowledge of basic computing skills including the ability to grasp and understand new data processing and analytics concepts that relate to information systems.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Identify individual strengths and interests.
  • Distinguish between various career choices.
  • Explain the alignment between personal interests and business career areas.
  • Summarize the connection between workplace activities and personal success factors.

Courses

  • COM304 - Academic and Career Success
  • ORG100 - Personal Leadership and Academic Success
  • MGT200 - Business and Technology Professional Studies
  • ITS320 - Basic Programming
  • MIS407 - Database Concepts
  • MIS445 - Statistics in Business Analytics
  • COM420 - Strategic Communication of Data Analysis
  • MIS450 - Data Mining
  • MIS470 - Data Science Foundation

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Undergraduate Certificate in Digital Marketing

The Undergraduate Certificate in Digital Marketing is a 15-credit hour offering that provides students with a working knowledge of digital marketing skills leading to the compilation of an effective digital marketing campaign. Students will obtain a working knowledge of the use of email, websites, social media, mobile marketing, video marketing and display advertising as well as SEM, SEO and PPC. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Apply the principles of branding, customer lifetime value, and customer retention to traditional and digital marketing.
  • Articulate how marketing practices and the communications mix support an organization’s marketing strategies.
  • Describe how a company uses various traditional and non-traditional marketing tools to reach its target market.
  • Analyze how marketing efforts are evaluated using traditional market research methods as well as search engine optimization, social media metrics, lead generation, and other methods.
  • Assess the marketing challenges associated with privacy, security, and ethics.

Courses

  • MKG310 - Introduction to Marketing
  • MKG370 - Website and Content Marketing
  • MKG380 - Social Media Marketing
  • MKG420 - Digital Marketing
  • MKG430 - Market Research Through Digital Metrics and Analytics

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Undergraduate Certificate in Digital Marketing with Leadership Fundamentals

Students in the Digital Marketing with Leadership Fundamental certificate program learn about themselves as professionals and plan their next career step from an informed, hands-on perspective. Students first develop skills for success and professional communications that apply to all workplaces, plus begin to develop a leadership style. Students then learn about jobs in business and technology and have opportunities to evaluate their own interests and goals in comparison to the work in different industries. Students obtain a working knowledge of digital marketing skills leading to the compilation of an effective digital marketing campaign. Students will obtain a working knowledge of the use of email, websites, social media, mobile marketing, video marketing and display advertising as well as SEM, SEO and PPC.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Identify individual strengths and interests.
  • Distinguish between various career choices.
  • Explain the alignment between personal interests and business career areas.
  • Summarize the connection between workplace activities and personal success factors.

Courses

  • COM304 - Academic and Career Success
  • ORG100 - Personal Leadership and Academic Success
  • MGT200 - Business and Technology Professional Studies
  • MKG310 - Introduction to Marketing
  • MKG370 - Website and Content Marketing
  • MKG380 - Social Media Marketing
  • MKG420 - Digital Marketing
  • MKG430 - Market Research Through Digital Metrics and Analytics

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Undergraduate Certificate in Fundraising

In this bachelor’s degree certificate, students develop the ability to lead fundraising efforts in nonprofit organizations, maximizing the ability of the organization’s leaders to obtain private, corporate, and government funding. Students develop strategies to oversee fundraising campaigns and events and develop skills to solicit donations for nonprofit organizations. Course work prepares students to solicit funding from a variety of sources, utilize promotional materials, and promote awareness of an organization’s strategic goals and financial needs. Students will also be prepared to use 21st-century technology to leverage the financial growth of nonprofit organizations. Finally, students will develop communication and organizational skills, public relation skills, and general business management skills. CSU-Global graduates with this certificate are prepared to work in nonprofit organizations in education, research and healthcare, social services, and in government and political positions. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid. Please note - We are no longer accepting new students into this certificate program.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Apply philanthropy skills to a broad spectrum of nonprofit organizations.
  • Demonstrate effective fundraising practices and strategies.
  • Implement frameworks to cultivate and retain donors.
  • Demonstrate ethical principles through critical communication strategies with nonprofit organizational leadership. for fundraising.
  • Integrate financial analysis, forecasting, budgeting, and reporting for fundraising.
  • Secure, negotiate, and manage grant awards from funding sources.
  • Create effective comprehensive communications plans to meet fundraising goals.

Courses

  • HSM300 - Introduction to Human Services
  • COM312 - Public Relations Techniques
  • COM321 - Campaign and Event Planning
  • PMG370 - Fundraising and Grant Writing
  • MKG380 - Social Media Marketing
  • SOC460 - Community Development

Please note- We are no longer accepting new students for this undergraduate certificate.

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Undergraduate Certificate in Information Technology Operations

The Undergraduate Certificate in Information Technology Operations provides students with the skills necessary to secure employment in the highly dynamic and fast-growing technology industry. Students are prepared to apply broad problem-solving solutions to information technology issues with an emphasis on service, operations, and maintenance. Additionally, students completing the certificate program are equipped to enter a variety of IT operations positions, such as network or computer system administrators, computer technicians, network technicians, and other technical roles. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Gain technology certification exam preparation.
  • Comprehend the theoretical and applied uses of information technology in various business applications for problem-solving.
  • Apply knowledge and skills in system analysis and design, network design and administration, database design and development, operating systems, software and web application development, and IT security.
  • Acquire technical skills in programming and technology troubleshooting.

Courses

  • ITS310 - Introduction to Computer-Based Systems (Personal Computing)
  • ITS315 - Introduction to Networks
  • ITS320 - Basic Programming
  • ITS350 - Information Systems and Security
  • ITS410 - Database Management
  • ITS430 - Network Enterprise Solutions

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Undergraduate Certificate in Information Technology Operations with Leadership Fundamentals

Students in the Information Technology Operations with Leadership Fundamental certificate program learn about themselves as professionals and plan their next career step from an informed, hands-on perspective. Students first develop skills for success and professional communications that apply to all workplaces, plus begin to develop a leadership style. Students then learn about jobs in business and technology and have opportunities to evaluate their own interests and goals in comparison to the work in different industries. Students become prepared to apply broad problem-solving solutions to information technology issues with an emphasis on service, operations, and maintenance. Additionally, students completing the certificate program are equipped to enter a variety of IT operations positions, such as network or computer system administrators, computer technicians, network technicians, and other technical roles.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Gain technology certification exam preparation.
  • Comprehend the theoretical and applied uses of information technology in various business applications for problem-solving.
  • Apply knowledge and skills in system analysis and design, network design and administration, database design and development, operating systems, software and web application development, and IT security.
  • Acquire technical skills in programming and technology troubleshooting.

Courses

  • COM304 - Academic and Career Success
  • ORG100 - Personal Leadership and Academic Success
  • MGT200 - Business and Technology Professional Studies
  • ITS310 - Introduction to Computer-Based Systems (Personal Computing)
  • ITS315 - Introduction to Networks
  • ITS320 - Basic Programming
  • ITS350 - Information Systems and Security
  • ITS410 - Database Management
  • ITS430 - Network Enterprise Solutions

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Undergraduate Certificate in Marketing

The Undergraduate Certificate in Marketing is an 18 credit-hour offering, targeted toward students from a wide variety of disciplines. These courses are designed for students interested in career tracks in marketing through the application of product strategy, pricing, distribution, and promotion. There is an emphasis on understanding consumer needs through marketing research, both domestically and internationally. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Apply the principles of branding, customer lifetime value, and customer retention to traditional and digital marketing.
  • Articulate how marketing practices and the communications mix support an organization’s marketing strategies.
  • . Describe how a company uses various traditional and non-traditional marketing tools to reach its target market.
  • Analyze how marketing efforts are evaluated using traditional market research methods as well as search engine optimization, social media metrics, lead generation, and other methods.
  • Assess the marketing challenges associated with privacy, security, and ethics.

Courses

  • MKG310 - Introduction to Marketing
  • MKG330 - Consumer Behavior
  • MKG350 - Integrated Marketing, Promotions, and Advertising
  • MKG420 - Digital Marketing
  • MKG470 - Marketing Research
  • MKG340 - Product and Brand Management

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Undergraduate Certificate in Marketing with Leadership Fundamentals

Students in the Marketing with Leadership Fundamental certificate program learn about themselves as professionals and plan their next career step from an informed, hands-on perspective. Students first develop skills for success and professional communications that apply to all workplaces, plus begin to develop a leadership style. Students then learn about jobs in business and technology and have opportunities to evaluate their own interests and goals in comparison to the work in different industries. Students learn about the application of product strategy, pricing, distribution, and promotion. There is an emphasis on understanding consumer needs through marketing research, both domestically and internationally.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Apply the principles of branding, customer lifetime value, and customer retention to traditional and digital marketing.
  • Articulate how marketing practices and the communications mix support an organization’s marketing strategies.
  • Describe how a company uses various traditional and non-traditional marketing tools to reach its target market.
  • Analyze how marketing efforts are evaluated using traditional market research methods as well as search engine optimization, social media metrics, lead generation, and other methods.
  • Assess the marketing challenges associated with privacy, security, and ethics.

Courses

  • COM304 - Academic and Career Success
  • ORG100 - Personal Leadership and Academic Success
  • MGT200 - Business and Technology Professional Studies
  • MKG310 - Introduction to Marketing
  • MKG330 - Consumer Behavior
  • MKG350 - Integrated Marketing, Promotions, and Advertising
  • MKG420 - Digital Marketing
  • MKG470 - Marketing Research
  • MKG340 - Product and Brand Management

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Undergraduate Certificate in Networking

The Undergraduate Certificate in Networking is an 18-credit, stand-alone certificate. This certificate will also grant college credit and allow for direct transfer credit (i.e. stackable) into the existing B.S. in Information Technology program. The certificate provides students with an opportunity to gain industry ready preparedness and allow them to later continue their studies to earn a full degree. The certificate program also aligns with six industry IT certifications that students can take after completing each course. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid. Please Note - We are no longer accepting new students into this certificate.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze and troubleshoot common computer networking issues.
  • Compare and contrast various network technologies and topologies.
  • Design secure wired and wireless networks.
  • Implement security measures and techniques for local and wide area networks.
  • Evaluate existing network installations and configurations for areas of improvement.

Courses

  • ITS310 - Introduction to Computer-Based Systems (Personal Computing)
  • ITS315 - Introduction to Networks
  • ITS350 - Information Systems and Security
  • ITS405 - Intermediate Networking
  • ITS420 - Advanced Networking Systems
  • ITS430 - Network Enterprise Solutions

Please note- We are no longer accepting new students for this undergraduate certificate.

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Undergraduate Certificate in Project Management

The undergraduate Certificate in Project Management is an 18 credit-hour stand-alone program. In their work toward this certificate, students have the opportunity to analyze and apply theories and concepts associated with temporary endeavors undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result. The students use this opportunity to emphasize key project management knowledge areas with a more robust focus across project, program, and portfolio management. Additionally, the courses demonstrate the application and benefits of project planning, scheduling, risk management, monitoring, controlling, the earned value method, and project quality management in managing projects, programs, and portfolios. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Apply management and leadership theories as they relate to project, program and portfolio management.
  • Apply effective communication and research skills.
  • Examine tools and techniques of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, and closing projects.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills for effective analysis and decision making.
  • Demonstrate skills in project quality management.

Courses

Complete the following:
  • PJM310 - Introduction to Project Management
  • PJM330 - Effective Project Scheduling and Control
  • PJM380 - Project Management Tools
Completed at least 3 of the following:
  • PJM405 - Fundamentals of Agile Methodologies
  • PJM400 - Project Procurement and Contract Management
  • PJM410 - Assessing and Managing Risk
  • PJM440 - Project Quality Management

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Undergraduate Certificate in Project Management with Leadership Fundamentals

Students in the Project Management with Leadership Fundamental certificate program learn about themselves as professionals and plan their next career step from an informed, hands-on perspective. Students first develop skills for success and professional communications that apply to all workplaces, plus begin to develop a leadership style. Students then learn about jobs in business and technology and have opportunities to evaluate their own interests and goals in comparison to the work in different industries. Students have the opportunity to analyze and apply theories and concepts associated with temporary endeavors undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result. The students use this opportunity to emphasize key project management knowledge areas with a more robust focus across project, program, and portfolio management. Additionally, the courses demonstrate the application and benefits of project planning, scheduling, risk management, monitoring, controlling, the earned value method, and project quality management in managing projects, programs, and portfolios. 

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Apply management and leadership theories as they relate to project, program and portfolio management.
  • Apply effective communication and research skills.
  • Examine tools and techniques of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, and closing projects.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills for effective analysis and decision making.
  • Demonstrate skills in project quality management.

Courses

Complete the following:
  • COM304 - Academic and Career Success
  • ORG100 - Personal Leadership and Academic Success
  • MGT200 - Business and Technology Professional Studies
  • PJM310 - Introduction to Project Management
  • PJM330 - Effective Project Scheduling and Control
  • PJM380 - Project Management Tools
Completed at least 3 of the following:
  • PJM405 - Fundamentals of Agile Methodologies
  • PJM400 - Project Procurement and Contract Management
  • PJM410 - Assessing and Managing Risk
  • PJM440 - Project Quality Management

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Undergraduate Certificate in Web Application Development

The Undergraduate Certificate in Web Application Development will encompass both synchronous as well as asynchronous methods using the LMS. Students are exposed to an engaging online practical experience. The certificate offers a career-focused perspective to prepare graduates for the job market as web application developers. The experience includes mentoring from faculty Student Success Counselors to provide feedback on IT coding projects completed and additional engagement with cohort participants. The certificate will also work on the development of presentation and communication skills as students present their comprehensive final projects. The certificate also offers career advice from CSU Global’s Career Navigation Services department as well as career coaching advice and resume assistance as students prepare for their first interviews. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Explain user interface requirements for a given web application.
  • Demonstrate designing a web application.
  • Develop user requirements in the creation of a web application.
  • Create a database to support a web development problem.
  • Acquire technical skills in programming web applications.
  • Acquire technical skills to pursue a position as a web application developer.

Courses

  • ITS320 - Basic Programming
  • ITS330 - Web Design and Development
  • ITS335 - Human Computer Interaction
  • ITS350 - Information Systems and Security
  • ITS345 - Web Development with PHP
  • ITS410 - Database Management

*Students in the BS in Cybersecurity program will take ITS441 instead of ITS410.

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Undergraduate Certificate in Web Application Development with Leadership Fundamentals

Students in the Project Management with Leadership Fundamental certificate program learn about themselves as professionals and plan their next career step from an informed, hands-on perspective. Students first develop skills for success and professional communications that apply to all workplaces, plus begin to develop a leadership style. Students then learn about jobs in business and technology and have opportunities to evaluate their own interests and goals in comparison to the work in different industries. In the Web Application Development classes, students have an engaging online practical experience with a career-focused perspective to prepare graduates for the job market as web application developers. The experience includes mentoring and feedback on completed IT coding projects. Students will also work on the development of presentation skills as they take an audience through their comprehensive final projects.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Explain user interface requirements for a given web application.
  • Demonstrate designing a web application.
  • Develop user requirements in the creation of a web application.
  • Create a database to support a web development problem.
  • Acquire technical skills in programming web applications.
  • Acquire technical skills to pursue a position as a web application developer.

Courses

  • COM304 - Academic and Career Success
  • ORG100 - Personal Leadership and Academic Success
  • MGT200 - Business and Technology Professional Studies
  • ITS320 - Basic Programming
  • ITS330 - Web Design and Development
  • ITS335 - Human Computer Interaction
  • ITS350 - Information Systems and Security
  • ITS345 - Web Development with PHP
  • ITS410 - Database Management

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Undergraduate Specializations

Students may complete a specialization that consists of five upper division courses (15 credits) as a supplement to their program major. Specializations allow students to select a series of courses in a career-relevant field based on professional and personal interests. Not all specializations are available for all majors. See the Bachelor’s Degree Specialization Chart for more information. Due to course overlap in some programs, a supplemental course may be required to bring the total of classes to five.

Once a student has completed all the courses within a specialization, they can request a non- transcribable Certificate of Completion to be mailed to them prior to the completion of their degree. Students should contact their Student Success Counselors for more information.

Undergraduate Specialization in Applied Clinical Social Sciences

In the Applied Clinical Social Sciences Specialization, students make use of social science research methods to investigate the human experience and examine how structures, relationships, and ideas of the social world relate to human behavior. Students taking this Specialization will prepare for careers in all areas of Human Services in need of researchers specializing in applied clinical social science data analysis and research methodology emphasizing critical thinking, interpersonal awareness, and team-building skills. Students will build practical knowledge in written and interpersonal communication, analytical reasoning, and decision-making. This Specialization offers a unique opportunity to apply clinical skills to Human Services with an interdisciplinary perspective related to the needs of populations that fall under the care of Human Services agencies and overall services. Upon completion of the Specialization, students integrate theory, social research, skills, and professional experience preparing them for employment in the workforce in public, private, and community settings.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate effective written communication and analytical skills specific to clinical research methodology for the Human Services sector.
  • Apply Human Services core competencies to clinical research methods.
  • Develop critical thinking, quantitative reasoning, and decision-making skills in data analysis used in the Human Services sector.
  • Examine the principles and practices that underpin Human Services.
  • Implement the impact of ethical behaviors specific to impacted populations served by Human Services agencies.
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of how research and analysis are used in policymaking for Human Services.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in undergraduate programs except Healthcare Administration and Management, and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics, and Human Services. Applied Social Sciences Specialization courses are listed in order of completion.

This specialization is available to students in undergraduate programs except Healthcare Administration and Management, and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics, and Human Services. Applied Social Sciences Specialization courses are listed in order of completion.

Courses

  • SOC300 - Working in Modern Society
  • SOC310 - Intersections of Race, Class, and Gender
  • PMG320 - Principles of Public Policy
  • SOC460 - Community Development
  • HSM470 - Evaluation of Research and Theory in Human Services

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Undergraduate Specialization in Artificial Intelligence and Robotics

The Artificial Intelligence and Robotics specialization advances the knowledge of professionals in with the areas of artificial intelligence, robotics, and machine learning. Students will gain a detailed understanding of artificial intelligence principles that are used in representing reasoning and uncertainty in a perceptive environment. Students will also gain an understanding of principles associated with applying machine learning to controlling a robot in a real-life environment.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Identify principles associated with search methods in artificial intelligence.
  • Evaluate the effects of uncertainty in a probabilistic setting, using artificial intelligence techniques.
  • Analyze technical mechanisms used to deconstruct an image for modeling.
  • Apply techniques that can be used to control a robot in a given environment.
  • Demonstrate the ability to model factors that can influence a robot’s path.

Specific Admission Requirements

Students are eligible to earn this specialization once they have completed the following prerequisite courses, CSC320-Programming I, CSC372-Programming II, and CSC400-Data Structures. This specialization is available to students in the Accounting, Computer Science, Healthcare Administration and Management, Information Technology, and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics, and Project Management programs.

Students are eligible to earn this specialization once they have completed the following prerequisite courses, CSC320-Programming I, CSC372-Programming II, and CSC400-Data Structures. This specialization is available to students in the Accounting, Computer Science, Healthcare Administration and Management, Information Technology, and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics, and Project Management programs.

Courses

  • CSC410 - Artificial Intelligence
  • CSC415 - Computer Vision
  • CSC425 - Principles of Machine Learning
  • CSC430 - Principles of Robotic Theory
  • CSC435 - Fundamentals of Information Retrieval and Web Searching

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Undergraduate Specialization in Business Administration

Students in the Business Administration specialization will prepare for careers in administration and responsibility for a variety of business operations. Students analyze sound business practices, including business finance, developing and managing human resources, developing and implementing business policies, and strategies for marketing a business.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop leadership capabilities in the role of manager.
  • Understand management functions of an organization.
  • Develop problem-solving and decision-making

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Business Management. Business Administration specialization courses are in the order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Business Management. Business Administration specialization courses are in the order of completion:

Courses

  • MGT300 - Principles of Management
  • HRM300 - Principles of Human Resource Management
  • MKG310 - Introduction to Marketing
  • MGT350 - Business Policy and Strategy
  • MGT451 - Business Policy Development and Implementation

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Undergraduate Specialization in Communication

The Communication specialization prepares students to strategize and deploy effective communications in current-day digital environments, social media platforms, and crisis and persuasion scenarios. Students will graduate with an understanding of information management, public relations, social media messages, crisis communications and issues management, and advocacy -- all areas where organizations need expertise to manage their reputations and relationships. A Communication specialization will lead graduates to careers in public affairs, political arenas, non-profit organizations, and internal and external corporate communications. Please note - We are no longer accepting students into this specialization.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Employ effective communication strategies appropriate to a workplace environment.
  • Synthesize data about audience factors to enable global content management of digital, social media, and other online communication channels.
  • Evaluate data analytics to drive a communications strategy.
  • Devise ready-to-deploy crisis communications plans and issues management strategies.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Communications, Computer Science, Healthcare Administration and Management, Information Technology, Marketing, and Organizational Leadership. Communication specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Communications, Computer Science, Healthcare Administration and Management, Information Technology, Marketing, and Organizational Leadership. Communication specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • COM303 - Professional Communications
  • COM322 - Persuasive Campaigns
  • COM410 - Crisis Communication and Issues Management
  • COM420 - Strategic Communication of Data Analysis
  • COM340 - Social Media and Public Relations

Please note- We are no longer accepting new students into this specialization.

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Undergraduate Specialization in Computer Programming

The Computer Programming specialization is aimed at non-computer science majors who would like to broaden their programming capabilities. Courses cover an entire spectrum of basic programming and software development techniques for analysis, design, and implementation of software applications across various operating systems and platforms. Students interested in these courses should have a firm knowledge of basic computer skills and networking technologies, including the ability to grasp and understand new computer/networking concepts that relate to information systems and networking.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Identify appropriate software engineering topics and concepts to solve a given business problem.
  • Develop conceptual models to access and update stored information.
  • Implement algorithms to solving problems using the Java programming language.
  • Develop software programs that manage resources securely in different operating system environments.
  • Discuss different platform-based development environments.
  • Analyze specific programming language requirements for multiple platforms.
  • Implement simple web and mobile applications.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in the Accounting, Healthcare Administration and Management, Information Technology, Management Information Systems and Business Analytics, and Project Management programs. Computer Programming specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in the Accounting, Healthcare Administration and Management, Information Technology, Management Information Systems and Business Analytics, and Project Management programs. Computer Programming specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • CSC320 - Programming I
  • CSC372 - Programming II
  • CSC400 - Data Structures and Algorithms
  • CSC450 - Programming III
  • CSC475 - Platform Based Development

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Undergraduate Specialization in Construction Management

In the Construction Management specialization, students are prepared to become effective managers and supervisors for public and private construction projects. The undergraduate specialization in construction management will cover essential domains that help professionals to assume leadership roles in the construction industry. Graduates of this specialization are prepared for success in the rapidly changing construction industry by focusing on areas such as construction project management, construction planning and scheduling, construction cost estimating, construction methods and materials, and sustainable construction, among other foundational construction management skills.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Identify the key requirements of various stages of work in construction projects.
  • Evaluate the key construction materials and methods and technologies used in construction.
  • Assess the roles of the different participants in construction projects.
  • Examine economic, social, and ethical considerations in construction management.
  • Develop construction project schedules.
  • Prepare accurate cost estimates and bid proposals.

Specific Admission Requirements

Construction Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Construction Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • CMG300 - Fundamentals of Construction Management
  • PJM350 - Construction Project Management
  • CMG400 - Construction Cost Estimating
  • CMG450 - Materials Used in Construction
  • CMG465 - Sustainable Development

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Undergraduate Specialization in Criminal Forensics

The Criminal Forensics specialization prepares students for positions in various public and private sector investigations agencies or for pursuit of a forensics graduate program. With a scientific underpinning, this specialization focuses on developing the skills needed to analyze crime scene evidence while following legal procedures that preserve evidence for use in court.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Assess the role of evidence collection in the court and trial process.
  • Discuss the role of the forensic scientist and forensic technician.
  • Assess the principles of crime scene investigation, including the recognition, collection, identification, preservation, and documentation of physical evidence.
  • Apply basic forensic methods in collecting, processing, analyzing, and evaluating criminal evidence.
  • Describe reports that are completed for crime scenes, physical evidence, and scientific process.
  • Discover emerging concepts and practices in criminal investigation.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Healthcare Administration and Management. Criminal Forensics specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Healthcare Administration and Management. Criminal Forensics specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • CRJ325 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology
  • CRJ336 - Criminal Investigation
  • CRJ426 - Investigative and Forensic Interviewing
  • CRJ450 - Investigative Forensic Photography
  • CRJ465 - Crime Scene Investigation (CSI)

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Undergraduate Specialization in Criminal Justice Management

The Criminal Justice Management specialization is designed to provide students with knowledge and skills needed by professionals in criminal justice organizations. Students will examine a holistic approach to the fundamentals of criminal justice within the context of management and effective decision- making.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Describe criminal justice foundational elements.
  • Evaluate the ethical issues facing criminal justice organizations and personnel.
  • Evaluate existing research using quantitative and statistical tools to make decisions.
  • Apply the factors of effective management and leadership in criminal justice environments.
  • Assess theories to successfully manage teams and organizations in criminal justice.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Criminal Justice and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics. Criminal Justice specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Criminal Justice and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics. Criminal Justice specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • CRJ340 - Restorative and Community Based Justice
  • CRJ330 - Research Methods for the Criminal Justice Professional
  • ORG405 - Principles and Practices of Effective Leadership
  • CRJ440 - Ethics for the Criminal Justice Professional
  • CRJ460 - Managing Criminal Justice Organizations

Note: BS - Organizational Leadership students who had this specialization will take CRJ360 in place of ORG405.

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Undergraduate Specialization in Criminology

The Criminology specialization assists the career tracks of students interested in or currently employed in the areas of public safety, law, social welfare offices, or other social programs that specifically deal with public safety and human welfare. Students examine this issue of crime and deviant behaviors, law, and the penal system.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Recognize systems/management responsibilities within public safety.
  • Comprehend the leadership responsibilities in law and criminology.
  • Understand the effects of crimes/deviant behavior on victims/society.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Healthcare Administration and Management, and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics. Criminology specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Healthcare Administration and Management, and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics. Criminology specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • CRJ320 - Juvenile Justice
  • CRJ340 - Restorative and Community Based Justice
  • CRJ470 - Race, Class, and Crime
  • CRJ315 - Corrections
  • CRJ431 - Victimology

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Undergraduate Specialization in Cyber Security

The Cyber Security specialization advances the knowledge of information technology professionals understanding of cyber threats, information assurance, and digital crime investigation developing the knowledge, skills, and abilities to secure organizational data as information security experts in an information technology dependent enterprise. Coursework is aligned with some elements of the knowledge base for the CISSP - Certified Information Systems Security Professional. Students interested in this specialization should have a firm knowledge of basic computer skills and information security including the ability to grasp and understand the controls and concepts needed to safeguard organizational data.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Compare various information technology security models, architectures, and risks associated with data processing, transmission, and storage in an enterprise.
  • Evaluate different networking vulnerabilities and methods used to attack and/or compromise the integrity of IT networks in an enterprise, and provide a comprehensive solution to mitigate potential attacks.
  • Integrate continuous monitoring and real-time security solutions to mitigate potential attacks in an enterprise.
  • Demonstrate a knowledge and interpretation of ethical and legal issues surrounding information technology security, including privacy, legislation, and innovation.
  • Analyze regional as well as international threats impacting Internet-based activities for use in a multinational enterprise.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is only available to students in the Computer Science, Information Technology, and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics programs. Cyber Security specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is only available to students in the Computer Science, Information Technology, and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics programs. Cyber Security specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • ITS360 - Introduction to Cyber Security and Digital Crime
  • ITS415 - Principles of Cyber Security
  • ITS425 - Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing
  • ITS455 - Digital Forensics and Investigations
  • ITS460 - Information Security Legal and Ethical Issues

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Undergraduate Specialization in Data Management and Analysis

In this specialization students are provided with the best practices to collect and manage enterprise data, prepare it for business use, and the various types of statistical analyses that can be performed to help an organization increase its productivity, profitability, and performance. Students will learn the entire spectrum of basic database concepts and techniques, web analytics, SQL programming, statistics, data analytics, and data mining. Students interested in this specialization should have a firm knowledge of basic computer skills.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate how relational databases and statistical analyses are used for enterprise applications and to develop Business Intelligence (BI).
  • Design a relational database from user requirements.
  • Utilize SQL to create a relational database, query data, and prepare data for a statistical analysis.
  • Perform data mining and other statistical analyses using analytical software.
  • Perform data mining and other statistical analyses using analytical software.
  • Demonstrate the use of analytics on data from varying sources including the web.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Management Information Systems and Business Analytics. Data Management and Analysis specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Management Information Systems and Business Analytics. Data Management and Analysis specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • MIS370 - Web Analytics
  • MIS407 - Database Concepts
  • MIS445 - Statistics in Business Analytics
  • MIS450 - Data Mining
  • MIS470 - Data Science Foundation

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Undergraduate Specialization in Digital Marketing

The Digital Marketing specialization provides students with an understanding of digital marketing and the skills associated with compiling a successful and effective digital marketing campaign. Students will examine the contribution of various digital marketing tactics in the overall marketing campaign. Additionally, students will make data driven decisions using digital metrics to target customers through SEM, SEO, and PPC.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Articulate digital marketing strategies presently used in the field of marketing.
  • Explain the impact of global competition, market forces and other external factors on the success and failure of specific digital marketing initiatives.
  • Use digital market research tools and predictive analytics tools.
  • Apply technology strategies and marketing theory to digital marketing decisions.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except for Criminal Justice. Digital Marketing specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except for Criminal Justice. Digital Marketing specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • MKG310 - Introduction to Marketing
  • MKG370 - Website and Content Marketing
  • MKG380 - Social Media Marketing
  • MKG420 - Digital Marketing
  • MKG430 - Market Research Through Digital Metrics and Analytics

Note: MKG310 is a core course in the Accounting bachelor's degree program. Therefore, Accounting majors who wish to take the Digital Marketing specialization will replace MKG310 with MKG330 in the specialization courses.

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Undergraduate Specialization in Emergency Management

The specialization in Emergency Management provides students the opportunity to apply and analyze theories and concepts to practical applications associated with emergency planning, crisis response, and public safety research on both a domestic and international level. The program focuses on crisis and emergency management decision-making and exposes students to dynamic planning, operations, and all-hazard readiness and identification procedures and scenarios. Furthermore, the student explores infrastructure protection and preparedness, phases for crisis response, mitigation activities, and integration of public and private resources. The students will gain significant critical thinking and decision-making abilities as this Emergency Management program utilizes virtual, interactive real-world scenarios and multiple multi-media platforms to practice their skills and techniques in a “safe” classroom environment.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze the concepts and theories of emergency management and interpret disasters responses and implications.
  • Discuss environmental hazards including man-made or natural events while interpreting and correlating planning and response regarding emergency events with an emphasis on all-hazard readiness.
  • Apply critical thinking and decision-making as key functions to emergency management specifically during crisis operations.
  • Assess crisis and emergency response and recovery issues and integrate exercise planning & coordination.
  • Describe strategies toward infrastructure preparedness and protection.
  • Analyze current international emergency management trends and tactics.

Specific Admission Requirements

Emergency Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Emergency Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • EMG300 - Foundations of Emergency Management
  • EMG325 - Hazard Mitigation
  • EMG375 - Disaster Response
  • EMG400 - Disaster Recovery
  • EMG450 - Comprehensive Emergency Planning

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Undergraduate Specialization in Foundations of Accounting

Students will apply understanding of accounting standards and practices in preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial transactions relevant to businesses in today’s world of automation, business intelligence, and data analytics. Primary emphasis is on the financial accounting system for sole proprietorships and the procedures for recording, summarizing, reporting, and interpreting results of business activities. This course will cover the development of basic financial accounting statements, ethical considerations, and the application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop fundamental accounting knowledge, skills, and abilities needed for careers in the accounting field.
  • Demonstrate decision-making skills using business intelligence applications in managing an organization.
  • Assess the effect of GAAP and IFRS on transactions involving assets and current liabilities
  • Construct individual and business tax returns using artificial intelligence (AI).
  • Evaluate the importance of internal controls in reducing overall audit risk.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Accounting. Students in the Foundations of Accounting Specialization must have access to a Personal Computer (PC) to work with applications/software required to complete assignments that are not supported on other devices like Apple/ Mac devices. Foundations of Accounting specialization courses (listed in order of completion):

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Accounting. Students in the Foundations of Accounting Specialization must have access to a Personal Computer (PC) to work with applications/software required to complete assignments that are not supported on other devices like Apple/ Mac devices. Foundations of Accounting specialization courses (listed in order of completion):

Courses

  • ACT300 - Principles of Accounting and Analytics
  • ACT325 - Principles of Accounting and Decision Analysis
  • ACT350 - Intermediate Accounting I
  • ACT406 - Business Intelligence in Taxation
  • ACT450 - Auditing

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Undergraduate Specialization in Fundraising

In this bachelor’s degree specialization students will develop the ability to lead fundraising efforts in nonprofit organizations, maximizing the ability of the organization’s leaders to obtain private, corporate and government funding. Students will develop strategies to oversee fundraising campaigns and events, and develop skills to solicit donations for nonprofit organizations. Course work will prepare students to solicit funding from a variety of sources, design promotional materials and promote awareness of an organization’s strategic goals and financial needs. In addition, students will be prepared to use 21st century technology skills to leverage nonprofit organization financial growth. Finally, students will develop communication and organizational skills, public relation skills, and general business management skills. CSU Global graduates with this specialization would work in nonprofit organizations such as educational and religious organizations, research and healthcare companies, social services organizations, and government and political positions. Please Note - We are no longer accepting new students into this specialization.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Foster philanthropy among organizational communities.
  • Demonstrate effective fundraising practices and strategies.
  • Implement frameworks to cultivate and retain donors.
  • Integrate financial analysis, forecasting, budgeting, and reporting for fundraising.
  • Secure, negotiate, and manage grant awards from funding sources.
  • Create a comprehensive communications plan to meet fundraising goals.

Specific Admission Requirements

Fundraising specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Fundraising specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • COM321 - Campaign and Event Planning
  • COM312 - Public Relations Techniques
  • PMG370 - Fundraising and Grant Writing
  • MKG380 - Social Media Marketing
  • SOC460 - Community Development

We are no longer accepting new students for this undergraduate specialization.

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Undergraduate Specialization in Health Sciences Management

The Health Sciences Management Specialization is designed for students who are interested in pursuing health-focused careers, preparing students to work with and improve diverse patient well-being and community health. Students learn about the structure of U. S. healthcare systems, and the impact of systems on service delivery. Leadership and professionalism are highlighted, along with the role of providers in delivering and managing care. Ethical and effective communication skills are also developed for working with diverse individuals, groups, and communities. Unique to this specialization, students will choose to focus on managed care or case management for one of the five required courses.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate solutions for multifaceted problems within the healthcare industry.
  • Apply ethical standards for decision-making in healthcare organizations and service delivery.
  • Engage diverse healthcare stakeholders using communications that reflect strong interpersonal skills, collaboration, and cultural awareness.
  • Analyze current policies and regulations relevant to the U.S. healthcare delivery system to inform change.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Healthcare Administration and Management. The Health Sciences specialization courses in the order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Healthcare Administration and Management. The Health Sciences specialization courses in the order of completion:

Courses

Complete the following:
  • HSC300 - Fundamentals of the U.S. Healthcare System
  • HSC310 - Social Impact on Health
  • HSC320 - Ethics and Law in the Health Sciences
  • HSC370 - Healthcare Management and Operations
Completed at least 1 of the following:
  • HSC373 - Case Management and Care Coordination
  • HSC371 - Managed Healthcare and Insurance

Unique to this specialization, students will choose to focus on managed care or case management for one of the five required courses. HSC373 Case Management and Care Coordination OR HSC371 Managed Healthcare and Insurance


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Undergraduate Specialization in Healthcare Communication

Healthcare Communication is an interdisciplinary specialization that focuses on the importance of interpersonal relationships within a healthcare environment and the need to use effective communication techniques to develop health campaigns. Healthcare Communication develops students' communication skills within a healthcare setting, including healthcare provider/ patient interactions, communicating among healthcare administrators, and internal communication in a healthcare environment. This specialization develops students who will be able to work within a healthcare setting, nonprofit organization, public relations firm, and other organizations with a health-centered mission. Graduates have the skills to effectively disseminate health information through electronic, print, and social media platforms. Please note- We are no longer accepting students into this specialization.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate ethical and effective use of social media with an awareness of legal and ethical implications.
  • Analyze data to better understand the relationship between issues, organizations, and audiences.
  • Practice a communication climate necessary for effective negotiations.
  • Develop a strategy and communicate persuasively to reach a target audience.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Computer Science, Criminal Justice, and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics. Healthcare Communication specialization courses (listed in order of completion):

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Computer Science, Criminal Justice, and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics. Healthcare Communication specialization courses (listed in order of completion):

Courses

  • COM303 - Professional Communications
  • COM322 - Persuasive Campaigns
  • COM412 - Introduction to Healthcare Communication
  • SOC310 - Intersections of Race, Class, and Gender
  • ORG470 - Leading Through Conflict Resolution

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Undergraduate Specialization in Healthcare Management

In this specialization, students will be provided with a broad understanding of healthcare principles for practical application as a manager or leader of a department in the healthcare industry. The knowledge and skills experienced in the coursework are designed to provide key information for critical thinking and decision-making, as it applies to healthcare issues.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze the history of healthcare systems and policy, and the influence on management.
  • Critique the impact of policy, population health, managed care, and quality on healthcare management.
  • Evaluate the significance and value of effective healthcare leadership.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Healthcare Administration and Management. Healthcare Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Healthcare Administration and Management. Healthcare Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • HCM310 - Introduction to the U.S. Healthcare System
  • HCM320 - Introduction to Health Policy
  • HCM370 - Quality and Risk Management in Healthcare
  • HCM400 - Managed Care and Health Insurance
  • HCM430 - Population Health Management

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Undergraduate Specialization in Human Resources and Organizational Development

Students in the Human Resource and Organizational Development specialization will build a strong background in human resource management and organizational development. Topics include workforce management, talent acquisition, employee development, policy and procedures, and change management. Students gain in-depth knowledge of HR and corporate structure to complement their bachelor’s degree program coursework. When paired with CSU Global’s Bachelor of Science in Business Management degree program, this specialization is aligned with the Society for Human Resource Management’s (SHRM) HR Curriculum Guidebook and Templates. Through these guidelines, SHRM acknowledges this program meets their educational standards to prepare individuals for careers in Human Resources.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze staff development and planning training programs.
  • Research social, ethical, and legal influences on modern organizations.
  • Integrate human resources management strategies and compensation systems.
  • Examine organizational culture and change dynamics.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Human Resource Management. Human Resources and Organizational Development specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Human Resource Management. Human Resources and Organizational Development specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • HRM300 - Principles of Human Resource Management
  • HRM445 - Labor Relations and Employment Law
  • HRM440 - Recruitment, Selection and Employee Development
  • HRM460 - Organizational Development
  • ORG470 - Leading Through Conflict Resolution

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Undergraduate Specialization in Human Services

In the Human Services Specialization, students engage the latest human services approach to care and service to others. Students taking this specialization will prepare for careers in all areas of Human Services in need of professionals, emphasizing embracing diversity and difference in practice, interpersonal awareness, and dedication to the independent success of others. Students will build practical knowledge in written and interpersonal communication and decision-making, focusing on servicing fragile populations. This specialization offers a unique interdisciplinary perspective related to the needs of populations in Human Services agencies and services. Upon completing the specialization, students integrate administrative knowledge, crisis management, and professional experience, preparing them for employment in the human services field to serve the public, private, and community settings.

Program Learning Outcomes

Specific Admission Requirements

The specialization is available to all students in undergraduate programs except Human Services. The Human Services Specialization courses are listed in order of completion.

The specialization is available to all students in undergraduate programs except Human Services. The Human Services Specialization courses are listed in order of completion.

Courses

  • HSM300 - Introduction to Human Services
  • SOC310 - Intersections of Race, Class, and Gender
  • HSM350 - Intervention Methods in Human Services
  • HSM405 - Case Management in Human Services
  • SOC460 - Community Development

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Undergraduate Specialization in Information Technology Management

The Information Technology Management specialization provides students with a holistic understanding of organizational technologies from which they can make decisions, manage the associated human and technology resources, and strategically plan for organizational growth and effectiveness.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Explain technology from a management perspective.
  • Describe how to meet and/or optimize organizational needs by proper management of information technology.
  • Compare the information technology needs with organizational needs.
  • Illustrate the theoretical and applied uses of information technology in various business applications for problem-solving.
  • Assess social, organizational, and ethical concerns of the practice of information technology.
  • Evaluate software and hardware options for information systems management.
  • Summarize software and hardware information technology management.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Computer Science and Information Technology. Information Technology Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Computer Science and Information Technology. Information Technology Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • ITS315 - Introduction to Networks
  • ITS350 - Information Systems and Security
  • ITS400 - Information Technology Project Management
  • ITS405 - Intermediate Networking
  • ITS430 - Network Enterprise Solutions

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Undergraduate Specialization in Information Technology Operations

The Information Technology Operations specialization provides students with the skills necessary to secure employment in the highly dynamic and fast-growing technology industry. Students are prepared to apply broad problem-solving solutions to information technology issues with an emphasis on service, operations, and maintenance.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop technical skills to prepare for various industry leading certification exams.
  • Explain the theoretical uses of information technology in various business applications.
  • Develop a plan that incorporates information technology techniques for a given business application.
  • Compare technical skills in programming and technology trouble-shooting.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Computer Science and Information Technology. Information Technology Operations specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Computer Science and Information Technology. Information Technology Operations specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • ITS310 - Introduction to Computer-Based Systems (Personal Computing)
  • ITS315 - Introduction to Networks
  • ITS320 - Basic Programming
  • ITS410 - Database Management
  • ITS430 - Network Enterprise Solutions

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Undergraduate Specialization in Intelligence and Homeland Security

This specialization is designed to provide the theories, concepts, and practical applications associated with the protection of the United States. Students will learn the homeland security goals for readiness and responsiveness as defined by national policy as well as how to identify and protect critical infrastructures and key resources from threats including terrorism, drug trafficking, and cyber-attacks. Procedures to reduce vulnerability, minimize damage, and recover from the effects of terrorist events will also be examined. This course will look to focus on both domestic and international homeland security and counter-terrorism trends and tactics. Students will be exposed to many real-world scenarios in a virtual and highly interactive class environment, which will serve to sharpen their critical thinking and decision-making abilities.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze history and apply concepts of homeland security to domestic and international situations in a dynamic threat environment.
  • Examine threats against homeland security and differentiate between the major threat categories including natural, man-made, and information/technology.
  • Describe the components of a national protection plan and outline the steps for identifying critical infrastructures and key resources.
  • Assess homeland security processes, including threat analysis, indication systems, and warning constructs.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of intelligence operations and the role these operations play in homeland security.

Specific Admission Requirements

Intelligence and Homeland Security specialization courses in order of completion:

Intelligence and Homeland Security specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • HLS300 - Introduction to Homeland Security
  • HLS350 - Terrorism
  • HLS375 - Risk Analysis and Mitigation
  • HLS400 - Critical Infrastructure + Key Resource (CIKR) Identification and Protection
  • HLS450 - Intelligence

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Undergraduate Specialization in International Business

The undergraduate specialization in International Business prepares students for international management career opportunities within multinational industries and organizations. Students will gain an understanding of international business topics related to managerial decision-making.




Program Learning Outcomes

  • Describe how cultures impact opportunities and outcomes in international business.
  • Demonstrate skills and strategies for developing and managing organizations and people across multiple cultures.
  • Analyze the scope of expansion and appropriate operations in the international marketplace.

Specific Admission Requirements

At least four courses in a specialization should be unique; if at least four courses are not unique because of courses shared with a parent (or some other) program, then students in the parent (or other) program are excluded from taking the specialization.


For Marketing students: MGT475 is substituted for MKG400.

For BSBM students: MGT475 is substituted for MGT305 and HRM435 is substituted for MGT405.

International Business specialization courses are listed in order of completion:


At least four courses in a specialization should be unique; if at least four courses are not unique because of courses shared with a parent (or some other) program, then students in the parent (or other) program are excluded from taking the specialization.


For Marketing students: MGT475 is substituted for MKG400.

For BSBM students: MGT475 is substituted for MGT305 and HRM435 is substituted for MGT405.

International Business specialization courses are listed in order of completion:


Courses

  • MGT305 - Introduction to International Business
  • MGT405 - Management in the Global Economy
  • MKG400 - International and Multi-Cultural Marketing
  • MGT451 - Business Policy Development and Implementation
  • HRM470 - Human Resource Management in a Global World

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Undergraduate Specialization in Marketing

The Marketing specialization provides students the exposure to the many facets of marketing including development, advertisement, distribution, and sale of products and services. The specialization focuses the learner on the management and use of research, planning, analysis, consumer communication, business relations, and decision-making techniques, as used by marketing managers and directors through effective corporate communication channels.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze buyer behaviors using current marketing strategies and theories.
  • Develop target markets, market segments, and the marketing mix for a campaign.
  • Utilize marketing research methods to make data driven decisions about market potential, target market, and value propositions.
  • Apply technology strategies and marketing theory to marketing decisions.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Marketing. Marketing specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Marketing. Marketing specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • MKG310 - Introduction to Marketing
  • MKG330 - Consumer Behavior
  • MKG340 - Product and Brand Management
  • MKG350 - Integrated Marketing, Promotions, and Advertising
  • MKG470 - Marketing Research

Note: MKG310 is a core course in the Accounting bachelor's degree program. Therefore, Accounting majors who wish to take the Marketing specialization will replace MKG310 with MKG420 in the specialization courses.

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Undergraduate Specialization in Operations and Supply Chain Management

In the Operations and Supply Chain Management specialization, students will prepare to fulfill the organizational roles and responsibilities of operations management. This specialization equips students with skills and knowledge to enable them to evaluate how companies manage manufacturing processes and services effectively and efficiently. It also teaches students about the use of information to improve organizational performance. The courses focus on developing students’ knowledge, skills, and abilities in operations management, production planning, inventory management, process and quality management, financial management, supply chain management, and continuous improvement. These specialization topic areas and content are aligned with APICS, The Association for Operations Management, Production and Inventory Management (CPIM) certification, and the Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP) certification.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate the systems necessary to develop and administer world-class operations management processes
  • Implement integrated financial and operations management systems.
  • Apply leadership skills enabling all employees to add value to the operations management component of an organization.
  • Apply the logic and critical thinking skills that organizations need to be competitive in a global environment
  • Analyze the implications of laws, regulations, ethics, and contracts, and apply the results of this analysis to improving the procedures governing the actions of a company.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs. Operations and Supply Chain Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs. Operations and Supply Chain Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • PJM400 - Project Procurement and Contract Management
  • OPS400 - Fundamentals of Operations Management
  • OPS402 - Financial Performance in Operations Management
  • OPS404 - Leadership in Operations Management
  • OPS405 - Managing the Supply Chain

Note: Project Management majors will take MTH410 instead of PJM400.

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Undergraduate Specialization in Organizational Leadership

The Organizational Leadership specialization provides students with a foundation of leadership theory, skills, and knowledge to lead teams and organizations. Students will also learn how to integrate and apply their learning to business policy and strategy implementation.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Comprehend the fundamental theories of effective leadership.
  • Apply leadership principles to team dynamics.
  • Analyze dynamics of change and how leaders can develop a culture adaptable to change.
  • Understand communication theories and strategies for effective leadership communication.
  • Synthesize the impact of effective leadership on policy development and strategy implementation.

Specific Admission Requirements

Organizational Leadership specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Organizational Leadership specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • ORG429 - Ethics and Law in Organizations
  • ORG470 - Leading Through Conflict Resolution
  • ORG405 - Principles and Practices of Effective Leadership
  • ORG423 - Communication Strategies for Leaders
  • ORG400 - Leading Teams in Organizations

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Undergraduate Specialization in Project Management

In the Undergraduate Specialization in Project Management, students will gain the opportunity to analyze and apply theories and concepts associated with temporary endeavors undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result. The emphasis of the specialization is on key project management knowledge areas with a more robust focus across project, program, and portfolio management. Additionally, the students demonstrate the application and benefits of project planning, scheduling, risk management, monitoring, controlling, the earned value method, and project quality management in managing projects, programs, and portfolios.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Apply management and leadership theories as they relate to project, program and portfolio management.
  • Apply effective communication and research skills.
  • Examine tools and techniques of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, and closing projects.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills for effective analysis and decision making.
  • Demonstrate skills in project quality management

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Project Management. Project Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Project Management. Project Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

Complete the following:
  • PJM310 - Introduction to Project Management
  • PJM330 - Effective Project Scheduling and Control
  • PJM380 - Project Management Tools
Completed at least 2 of the following:
  • PJM400 - Project Procurement and Contract Management
  • PJM405 - Fundamentals of Agile Methodologies
  • PJM410 - Assessing and Managing Risk



Note: MGT410 can be taken in place of PJM310; however, students who take MGT410 should not take PJM310.

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Undergraduate Specialization in Public Relations

The Public Relations specialization provides students a range of courses that will focus their understanding in specific public relations contexts, including media relations, event planning, international relations, internal relations, and social media management. In addition to coursework, this specialization encourages students to participate in promotions, publicity, community affairs, internal relations, writing, and special events planning. Please note- We are no longer accepting students into this specialization.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Write logically, clearly, persuasively, and precisely in a professional manner.
  • Engage in communication research, with a basic understanding of both qualitative and quantitative strategies.
  • Develop, deliver, & critique effective oral presentations.
  • Demonstrate high levels of interpersonal competence.
  • Apply public relations theory to historic and contemporary public relations cases.
  • Demonstrate sound ethical problem solving and decision-making.
  • Assemble a collection of public relations materials appropriate for display in a professional portfolio.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Management Information Systems and Business Analytics and Public Management. Public Relations specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs except Management Information Systems and Business Analytics and Public Management. Public Relations specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • COM302 - Principles of Public Relations
  • COM312 - Public Relations Techniques
  • COM321 - Campaign and Event Planning
  • COM340 - Social Media and Public Relations
  • COM360 - International Public Relations

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Undergraduate Specialization in Public and Non-Profit Management

In the Public and Non-Profit Management specialization, students will prepare for positions in both the public and non-profit sectors. Students learn to apply management strategies to leading organizations in training and developing staff. Students will also develop skills in identifying and utilizing social, political, and legal influences that drive organizational culture.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop strategies for staff development and planning training programs.
  • Apply social, ethical, and legal influences specific to nonprofit organizations.
  • Assess human resources management strategies and compensation systems.
  • Examine organizational culture, change dynamics, communication, and conflict-resolution approaches specific to nonprofit organizations.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs. Public and Non-Profit Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all undergraduate programs. Public and Non-Profit Management specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • PMG300 - Public Administration
  • FIN350 - Principles of Finance for the Public Sector
  • PMG320 - Principles of Public Policy
  • PMG370 - Fundraising and Grant Writing
  • PMG430 - Human Resource Management in the Public Sector

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Undergraduate Specialization in Virtualization and Cloud Computing

Throughout this 15 credit-hour sequence of undergraduate level IT coursework students experience an in-depth review and analysis of virtualization and cloud computing technologies across a variety of platforms. Students are prepared to implement and manage virtual and cloud technologies within an enterprise. The coursework provides a combination of both theoretical and professional competencies in the subject matter and introductory preparation for virtualization certifications.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate troubleshooting and administration techniques to manage a complex network environment.
  • Identify various cloud models.
  • Evaluate business opportunities to utilize and migrate to virtualization solutions.
  • Implement best practices used for securing virtual environments.
  • Operate a secured virtualized server infrastructure.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to undergraduate students in the Computer Science, Information Technology, and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics programs. Virtualization and Cloud Computing specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to undergraduate students in the Computer Science, Information Technology, and Management Information Systems and Business Analytics programs. Virtualization and Cloud Computing specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • ITS439 - Virtualization Technology Fundamentals
  • ITS405 - Intermediate Networking
  • ITS441 - Cloud Technology Fundamentals
  • ITS442 - Enterprise Cloud Computing
  • ITS446 - Securing Virtual and Cloud Systems

*Students in the BS in Cybersecurity program will take ITS345 instead of ITS446.

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Undergraduate Specialization in Web Application Development

The Web Application Development specialization provides students with the skills necessary to design and create web applications. Students are prepared to apply broad problem-solving solutions in the design and development of front-end and back-end web applications using programming languages and database technologies.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Explain user-interface requirements for a given web application.
  • Demonstrate designing a web application.
  • Develop user requirements in the creation of a web application.
  • Create a database to support a web development problem.
  • Acquire technical skills in programming web applications.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to undergraduate students in all undergraduate programs. Web Application Development specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is available to undergraduate students in all undergraduate programs. Web Application Development specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • ITS330 - Web Design and Development
  • ITS335 - Human Computer Interaction
  • ITS350 - Information Systems and Security
  • ITS345 - Web Development with PHP
  • ITS410 - Database Management

*Students in the BS in Cybersecurity program will take ITS441 instead of ITS410.

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CSU Global Undergraduate Specializations

Master's Degrees

CSU Global offers graduate-level degree programs. These include both academic Master of Science and professional focused Master programs:

  • Master of Business Administration
  • Master of Business Administration in Product Management
  • Master of Criminal Justice
  • Master of Finance
  • Master of Healthcare Administration
  • Master of Human Resource Management
  • Master of Information Technology Management
  • Master of Interdisciplinary Professional Studies
  • Master of Professional Accounting
  • Master of Project Management
  • Master of Science in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning
  • Master of Science in Data Analytics
  • Master of Science in Management
  • Master of Science in Marketing
  • Master of Science in Military and Emergency Responder Psychology
  • Master of Science in Organizational Leadership
  • Master of Science in Teaching and Learning
  • Master of Science in Teaching and Learning - Education Leadership Principal Licensure Concentration

To ensure success, students who do not fulfill select admission criteria may be required to take one additional credit-bearing course designed to familiarize them expectations for research, writing, and content knowledge. This Master’s Plus course increases the program to 39 credits. Management applicants with GPA or content area deficiencies may be required to take RES500. Organizational Leadership, Criminal Justice, and Healthcare Administration applicants with GPA deficiencies may be required to take RES501. These courses provide students with the opportunity to sharpen their skills and better prepare for the learning objectives of the program.

Master of Business Administration

The online Master of Business Administration (MBA) available at Colorado State University Global (CSU Global) is designed to provide professionals at all stages of their careers with the business principles and skills necessary to make informed decisions. To support successful navigation of dynamic business environments, the curriculum develops abilities in the areas of leadership, strategy, innovation, globalization, systems thinking, decision making, and ethics. Students will learn through the application of core business principles by way of problem-based learning (case studies, applied simulations) integrated into the curriculum. A student can also customize their learning path by choosing from one of 19 different focus areas including specializations such as finance, project management, and cybersecurity.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Coordinate strategic goals through effective stewardship of resources, application of leadership principles, and development of human capital.
  • Devise strategies that improve operations, revenue, quality, and performance.
  • Apply analytical skills for solving organizational challenges.
  • Assess financial performance measures.
  • Utilize quantitative and qualitative analysis tools for assessing business scenarios.
  • Evaluate situations from a systems thinking perspective to formulate actionable business plans.
  • Navigate the cultural complexities of a global business environment.

Specific Admission Requirements

Bachelor’s degree from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency with a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.00 or higher. Students who do not have a previous business-related degree from an ACBSP-accredited program must complete BUS500 before completing other program requirements. Provisionally admitted students whose undergraduate degrees do not meet the requirements will complete RES500 or RES501, rather than BUS500.

Courses

The program is 30 credit hours which includes six 3-credit core MBA courses and four 3-credit specialization courses in an area of interest to the student.

  • MBA510 - Creating and Implementing Marketing Strategies
  • MBA520 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
  • MBA530 - Financial Decision Making
  • MBA540 - Managing Operations and Supply Chains
  • MBA550 - Data-Driven Decision Making
  • MBA560 - Developing and Leading Strategy

Note: Some Master of Business Administration students may be required to take RES501 or BUS500 based on admissions requirements. In this case, the degree is 33 credit hours.

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Master of Business Administration in Product Management

The Master of Business Administration in Product Management prepares students for a career that encompasses the strategic partnership between product development and the marketing efforts of a service or product, ensuring the product or service not only meets the customers needs today but also resonates with the audience in the most compelling manner for the life cycle of the product.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Apply comprehensive knowledge of the Product Life Cycle.
  • Execute effective go-to-market strategies.
  • Develop sustainable business models for product success.
  • Create product roadmaps for adaptive growth strategies.
  • Apply tools to foster design innovation in dynamic market conditions.
  • Assessing effective pricing strategies.

Specific Admission Requirements

Bachelor’s degree from an institution that is accredited by an approved institutional accrediting agency with a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.00 or higher. Students who do not have a previous business related degree from an ACBSP-accredited program must complete BUS500 before completing other program requirements. Provisionally admitted students whose undergraduate degrees do not meet the requirements will complete RES500 or RES501, rather than BUS500.

Courses

The program is 30 credit hours, which includes ten 3-credit core MBA and MKG courses. The core courses are listed in the suggested order of completion: 

  • MBA510 - Creating and Implementing Marketing Strategies
  • MKG502 - Product and Brand Management
  • MKG521 - Advanced Marketing Analytics and Research
  • MKG532 - Digital Storytelling
  • MBA520 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
  • MBA530 - Financial Decision Making
  • MBA540 - Managing Operations and Supply Chains
  • MBA570 - Pricing Models and Optimization
  • MBA580 - Business Models, Product Roadmaps and Design Thinking
  • MBA590 - Leading Product Strategy Capstone

Note: Some Master of Business Administration in Product Management students may be required to take RES501 or BUS500 based on admissions requirements. In this case, the degree is 33 credit hours.

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Master of Criminal Justice

The Master of Criminal Justice provides an advanced understanding of theory and best practices of individuals in management positions of both public and private sector organizations. The curriculum addresses topics including ethics, decision-making, and the impact of crime in society to improve the effectiveness of criminal justice systems. Students can choose a number of specialization areas to complete the degree requirement after taking the core courses, depending on the personal interest and professional need, including Fraud Management -a fast-growing industry in crime prevention and investigation, especially in the private sector. This program serves as a pathway to career advancement. Please Note - We are no longer accepting new students into this program.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Describe crime and control from a range of theoretical and global perspectives.
  • Evaluate research design, data collection, and analytical method.
  • Discuss the roles, strategies, and impacts of effective leadership and management.
  • Evaluate the role of community-based justice in preventing crime.
  • Apply professional ethics and its importance in our criminal justice system.
  • Describe knowledge of high-tech and occupational crimes in cause, detection, investigation, prosecution, and prevention.
  • Evaluate how technology is used as a highly effective contemporary crime-fighting tool.

Courses

The Master of Criminal Justice program consists of 8 three-credit major courses and four 3-credit specialization courses in an area of interest to the student. The core courses are listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • CRJ500 - Criminological Theory
  • CRJ530 - Ethics, Justice and Social Control
  • CRJ540 - Criminal Justice Policy Development and Analysis
  • CRJ545 - Restorative Justice: A Social Movement
  • CRJ550 - Administration and Management of Criminal Justice Organizations
  • CRJ570 - Applied Research for Criminal Justice Professionals
  • CRJ575 - Analytical Methods
  • CRJ580 - Criminal Justice Capstone Experience

Note: Some Master of Criminal Justice students may also be required to take RES501 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, the degree is 39 credits.

CRJ595 is an optional course that students may select if they currently work in a criminal justice setting. Students will be required to pass a criminal background check, including fingerprinting, prior to taking CRJ. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

Please note- We are no longer accepting new students into this program.

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Master of Finance

The Master of Finance program is designed to develop leadership, international perspectives, and operational skills in finance by focusing on career development that incorporates state-of-the-art nontraditional and emerging electronic formats. This program is intended to enhance the knowledge, skills, and abilities of students in the vital areas of financial management, investment, capital market analysis, applied research, and quantitative skills. The Master of Finance is additionally accredited by ACBSP, which accredits quality business programs across the globe.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Justify financial decision-making skills in a career-based manner focused on effective communication.
  • Interpret financial statement analysis to evaluate the financial health of companies.
  • Contrast the risk adjusted valuation of securitized financial assets, such as bonds, stocks, and derivative securities.
  • Evaluate international investment projects to perform skilled security analysis, risk measurement, and portfolio management within a global context.
  • Summarize knowledge of institutions, development and financing as it relates to business industries.

Courses

The Master of Finance program consists of eight 3-credit core courses and four 3-credit specialization courses in an area of interest to the student. The core courses are listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • ORG502 - Effective Organizations: Theory and Practice
  • FIN500 - Principles of Finance
  • FIN507 - Bank Management
  • FIN530 - Corporate Finance
  • FIN540 - Investments
  • FIN550 - Financial Markets and Institutions
  • FIN570 - Insurance and Risk Management
  • FIN580 - Capstone: Finance

Note: Some Master of Finance students may also be required to take RES500 or BUS500 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, the degree is 39 credits.

Students who do not have a previous business-related degree from an ACBSP-accredited program must complete BUS500 before completing other program requirements. Provisionally admitted students whose undergraduate degrees do not meet the requirements will complete RES500 or RES501, rather than BUS500.

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Master of Healthcare Administration

Puerto Rico residents (only): This program does not fulfill the state’s requirement needed to work as a Healthcare Administrator in Puerto Rico.

In the Master of Healthcare Administration program, students are prepared for a wide variety of leadership and managerial roles within the healthcare industry. The program incorporates leadership skills, core-competency knowledge, analytical abilities, global perspective, and evidence-based management tools needed to effectively and efficiently lead and manage in healthcare organizations in multiple settings. Students gain an increased understanding and awareness of the U.S. healthcare delivery system, healthcare policy, laws, and issues facing the healthcare industry, with an emphasis on the areas of healthcare quality, population health, human resources, financial management, information technology systems and operations management, change and innovation, and strategic planning and other core competencies and practices important to managing within a healthcare environment.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate healthcare organizational problems using a systematic decision-making approach.
  • Prioritize the skills needed to manage, develop, and motivate organizations to meet changing organizational needs in a healthcare environment.
  • Create a strategic plan for a healthcare enterprise that integrates a critical analysis of the problem.
  • Critique the policies, procedures, laws, and ethics, and population health and quality management requirements of the diverse array of healthcare alternatives.
  • Evaluate the relationship between management, organizational leadership, analytical reasoning, operations, human resources, finance, marketing, and strategic planning in the healthcare industry.

Courses

The Master of Healthcare Administration program consists of eight 3-credit major courses and four 3-credit specialization courses in an area of interest to the student. The core courses are listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • HCM500 - The U.S. Healthcare System
  • HCM502 - Organizational Behavior Human Resources in Healthcare
  • HCM515 - Health Law and Ethics
  • HCM520 - Quality and Performance Improvement in Healthcare
  • HCM542 - Healthcare Operations Management
  • HCM565 - Healthcare Finance
  • HCM570 - Healthcare Information Systems
  • HCM580 - Capstone: Strategic Management in Healthcare

Note: Some Master of Healthcare Administration students may also be required to take RES501 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, the degree is 39 credits.

HCM595 is an optional course that will provide students with practical experience in management organizations. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Master of Human Resource Management

Students in the Master of Human Resource Management program will master the critical competencies necessary to lead, grow, develop, and enhance Human Resources (HR) departments. Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of HR theories, models, and practices. Students will be capable of demonstrating innovative strategies and techniques to conduct quality research analyses, identify organizational issues, and determine proper solutions. Students will be able to innovate and use diverse tools to do research, identify issues and find effective solutions. Students will learn how to apply theory in organizational settings, thereby increasing their ability to be strategic organizational partners in a global environment. Specific topics covered in this program include workforce management, strategic HR planning, organizational behavior and development, and workforce optimization. This program aligns with the Society for Human Resource Management’s HR Curriculum Guidebook.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Create HR management strategies that impact organizational effectiveness and culture.
  • Analyze global and technological challenges HR leaders might encounter.
  • Evaluate HR-related legal, ethical, and corporate social responsibilities that impact an organization.
  • Create initiatives to manage organizational talent to maximize employee engagement.
  • Implement HR metrics and systems to strategically advance growth and development in an organization.
  • Apply HR theories and models to assist organizations in achieving optimal performance.
  • Conduct research about HR issues and trends to determine effective solutions.

Courses

The Master of Human Resource Management program consists of eight 3-credit core courses and four 3-credit specialization courses in an area of interest to the student. The core courses are listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • ORG502 - Effective Organizations: Theory and Practice
  • HRM500 - Managing Human Resources
  • HRM510 - Organizational Behavior and Development
  • HRM515 - Legal and Human Resource Dimensions of Business Management
  • HRM550 - Strategic Labor Relations
  • HRM540 - Strategic Workforce Planning and Advancement
  • HRM560 - Talent Development
  • HRM580 - Capstone: Leading Human Capital

Note: Some Master of Human Resource Management students may also be required to take RES501 or BUS500 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, the degree is 39 credits.

Students who do not have a previous business-related degree from an ACBSP-accredited program must complete BUS500 before completing other program requirements.  Provisionally admitted students whose undergraduate degrees the requirements will complete RES500 or RES501, rather than BUS500.

HRM595 is an optional course that will provide students with practical experience in human resource management. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Master of Information Technology Management

The Master of Information Technology Management program is designed to prepare students for a wide variety of leadership roles within technology-rich environments. The program focuses on applying global perspectives and essential leadership tools to the strategic planning and efficient implementing of IT operations to meet organizational objectives. Through an increased understanding and awareness of the effective use of technical advancements at the enterprise level, graduates of this program will be prepared for positions as information technology managers or senior leaders in technology-driven industries.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate technical knowledge, skills, and abilities.
  • Develop effective and efficient technological solutions to issues in a complex enterprise.
  • Evaluate the potential ethical and legal ramifications of information technology in a given environment.
  • Align organizational & IT objectives for optimal accomplishment of common strategic business goals by utilizing internal staff, vendors, partners, and consultants.
  • Recommend and execute technology-based solutions that are aligned with strategic and operational objectives of the organization.
  • Communicate IT plans and recommendations to decision-making groups and others.

Courses

The Master of Information Technology Management program consists of eight 3-credit core courses and four 3-credit specialization courses in an area of interest to the student. The core courses are listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • ISM501 - IT Management
  • ISM511 - Managing Virtualized and Cloud Systems
  • ISM521 - Managing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems
  • ISM525 - Ethical Considerations in Managing Information Technology
  • ISM545 - Information Technology Auditing and Assurance
  • ISM550 - Information Systems and Security
  • ISM561 - Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery
  • ISM581 - Capstone: Information Technology Management

Note: Some Master of Information Technology Management students may also be required to take RES500 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, the degree is 39 credits.

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Master of Interdisciplinary Professional Studies

The online Master of Interdisciplinary Professional Studies is an individualized graduate degree program designed to allow students to advance their professional knowledge, skills, and abilities to meet the needs of today’s ever-changing and multi-faceted workplace. The program allows students to stack prior graduate coursework, specializations, and certificates to customize their degree to their targeted interest and career-focused position.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Advance strategic goals shared between and within communities and organizations
  • Synthesize data across disciplines to address challenges encountered by an organization and/or society.
  • Convey information using multiple technologies and media.
  • Cultivate ethical and diverse approaches to problem solving.

Courses

The Master of Interdisciplinary Professional Studies program consists of ten 3-credit courses. Students must choose two of the following course options to complete: BUS500, RES501, ORG502. Students will complete the remaining 24 credit hours through a selection of CSU Global graduate level courses and/or certifications or specializations. Courses are selected by the student and approved by the Program Director.

  • BUS500 - Foundations of Business
  • ORG502 - Effective Organizations: Theory and Practice
  • RES501 - Fundamentals of Research and Writing

Note: Some Master of Interdisciplinary Professional Studies students may also be required to take RES501 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, students will be required to take RES501.

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Master of Professional Accounting

Through the Master of Professional Accounting (MPAcc) degree, students will meet the educational requirements to prepare for careers in professional accounting. Students will also meet the educational requirements of the Certified Public Accountants as well as other accounting-related professional licenses’ examinations. Students’ coursework will focus on analytical, technical, leadership, teamwork, planning, and communication skills improvement. Students will be prepared for leadership roles in public accounting, corporations, government, non-profit entities, education, and related career fields. This 30 credit-hour program includes 24 credits of required coursework and 6 credits of track-specific emphasis coursework, to help students specialize in an area of accounting that meets their specific needs and career goals.

Program Accreditation

The MPAcc program is additionally accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). The ACBSP accredits quality business programs across the globe by evaluating aspects of leadership, strategic planning, relationships with stakeholders, quality of academic programs, faculty credentials, and educational support.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop accounting strategies to solve problems and improve performance.
  • Apply qualitative and quantitative analyses in decision-making and problem-solving.
  • Evaluate ethical and legal conflicts or issues.
  • Select appropriate accounting industry practices that meet organizational needs.
  • Analyze economic and financial concepts.
  • Determine effective communication techniques for various business issues and corporate situations.
  • Examine the principles and impact of accounting standards (domestic and international) on accounting transactions.

Specific Admission Requirements

In addition to the institutional graduate admission standards, students seeking admission to the MPAcc program must have an undergraduate degree with a major or concentration in accounting, which includes a minimum of 18 credit hours of upper-division accounting coursework.

If a student does not have an undergraduate degree with a major or concentration in accounting and has completed no previous accounting coursework or experience, they will need to complete introductory accounting courses (such as ACT300 and ACT325) before being approved for provisional admission into the MPAcc.

If introductory courses have been completed, students can seek admission with Program Director approval as long as they meet one of the following conditions:

  • Student has at least 15 hours of upper-division accounting coursework and previous experience in accounting.
  • Student has an M.B.A. with 12 hours of accounting coursework and previous experience in accounting.

Students who meet one of the above conditions but do not have prerequisite CSU Global coursework (including ACT350, ACT360, ACT406, ACT450, ACT460, and ACT470), or its equivalent are provisionally admitted to the program. The prerequisite courses required will be determined by the Program Director’s review of previous accounting coursework and experience.


To meet prerequisite requirements for admission, students must complete the above coursework within 12 months of starting and maintain a 3.0 grade point average. Students should reference the provisional admissions policy in university catalog for additional admission requirements.


The prerequisite coursework is designed to prepare students for the program. Students seeking to become CPAs may need to take additional courses to meet state requirements. Other courses may need to be taken to comply with the prerequisites of some electives.

Courses

The Master of Professional Accounting program consists of ten 3-credit courses, 8 core courses and 2 courses from a chosen emphasis. Core courses are listed below in the suggested order of completion:

  • ACT506 - Advanced Accounting II
  • ACT510 - Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination
  • ACT520 - International Accounting
  • ACT560 - Accounting Ethics
  • ACT570 - Advanced Cost Accounting
  • ACT575 - Advanced Auditing and Assurance Services
  • ACT555 - Advanced Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting
  • ACT580 - Capstone: Accounting

Note: Some Master of Professional Accounting students may also be required to take BUS500 and/or RES501 as part of their coursework if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00/do not earn an accredited degree in business courses and/or accounting, finance, or business statistics. In this case, the degree is 33 credits.

Students who do not have a previous business-related degree from an ACBSP-accredited program must complete BUS500 before completing other program requirements. Provisionally admitted students whose undergraduate degrees the requirements will complete RES500 or RES501, rather than BUS500.

The Master of Professional Accounting program offers five emphases to support professional accounting licenses and designations’ examinations. The emphases are also designed to meet the changing needs of employers in the accounting profession.

Data Analytics Emphasis

In today’s data-driven world, it is paramount for accounting professionals to have advanced analytical skills in addition to having in-depth accounting knowledge. Students in the Data Analytics Emphasis will acquire these skills. Using data analytics tools, students will learn how to collect and categorize voluminous data, and how to analyze and prioritize relevant data to make them useful for decision-making.

Students can apply Data Analytics to many facets of accounting, including taxation, auditing, consulting, and risk management. It is important for accountants who work in these areas to understand how to undertake data analysis. Students in the Master of Professional Accounting who select this emphasis with be equipped with these versatile and valuable skills. Students declaring Data Analytics Emphasis should have prior coursework and/or experience in statistics and basic programming.

Courses in the Data Analytics Emphasis include:

  • MIS510: Data Mining and Visualization
  • MIS542: Business Analytics

Fraud Investigations & Forensic Accounting Emphasis

Increased occurrences and awareness of fraudulent activities have resulted in a greater demand for fraud investigators and forensic accountants. Forensic Accounting extends beyond uncovering and investigating fraud. Forensic Accountants utilize their accounting skills to provide investigative, litigation, and valuation support in cases involving financial statement fraud, mergers and acquisitions, bankruptcy and insolvency, and divorce. Consequently, forensic accountants can work in public accounting, consulting, and forensic accounting service firms. Forensic accountants can provide expert services to lawyers, law enforcement agencies, insurance companies, governmental entities, non-profit organizations, and financial institutions. Students who select this emphasis may be interested in obtaining the Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE)’s designation. For more information on the CFE designation, visit the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners’ website.



Courses in the Fraud Investigations & Forensic Emphasis include:

  • ACT557: Advanced Fraud Investigations and Forensic Accounting
  • ACT558: Fraud and Forensic Accounting Data Analysis

Auditing & Assurance Emphasis

Auditing and assurance service is a vital accounting niche. Auditors play important roles in the financial reporting process. Audit and assurance service informs users by providing relevant insights about financial and non-financial information. Students interested in pursuing careers in internal audit, assurance services, and information technology auditing should pursue this emphasis. Students in the Auditing & Assurance Emphasis will learn how to evaluate internal controls and best practices in auditing using computer-based accounting systems. Students who select this emphasis can further benefit by obtaining the Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) or Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) designation.

Courses in the Auditing & Assurance Emphasis include:

  • ACT576: Internal Auditing
  • ACT577: Advanced Information System Audit

Taxation Emphasis

Students in the Taxation emphasis expand upon their previous conceptual understanding of taxation and understanding of tax laws and policies. Students will also learn tax research tools and policies. Tax professionals are in demand in public accounting, corporations, and governmental entities. Students who select this emphasis can further benefit by earning the Enrolled Agent (EA) designation. For more information on the EA designation, visit the Internal Revenue Services’ website.

Courses in the Taxation Emphasis include:

  • ACT550: Advanced Income Taxation
  • ACT551: Advanced Tax Policy and Research

Professional Accounting Emphasis

This emphasis is designed for students who want to take diverse courses for career growth or for meeting the education requirements of the CPA and other accounting professional licenses examinations. In addition to the eight required core courses, students can select two courses from the following list.

Courses in the Professional Accounting Emphasis include:

  • ACT550: Advanced Income Taxation
  • ACT557: Advanced Fraud Investigation & Forensic Accounting
  • ACT558: Fraud & Forensic Accounting Data Analysis
  • ACT595: Accounting Internship*
  • FIN520: Financial Reporting and Analysis
  • FIN530: Corporate Finance
  • MGT510: Strategy Planning

*ACT595 is an optional course that will provide students with practical experience in accounting. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Master of Project Management

In the Master of Project Management degree program, students will experience an integrated study of core business disciplines and project management with the advanced leadership and decision-making skills needed to excel in high-performing, global organizations. Students will gain business and management skills to evaluate, synthesize, analyze, and apply the concepts when leading unique projects on a multi-national scale. Project management best practices are addressed and applied throughout the program in the critical project management knowledge areas. Advanced topics include PMO, risk management, business analysis, and project monitoring and performance metrics.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze the environment in executing projects, programs, and portfolios within a global marketplace.
  • Apply advanced project management and organizational principles and skills to successfully implement projects.
  • Determine the primary professional traits and factors associated with successful project managers and leaders.
  • Execute effective planning and control strategies and best practices to ensure project success.
  • Apply ethical principles and models to global business policies, practices, and trends via case studies and scenarios.

Courses

The Master of Project Management program consists of eight 3-credit core courses and four 3-credit specialization courses in an area of interest to the student. The core courses are listed below in the following two sets:

Complete the following:
  • ORG502 - Effective Organizations: Theory and Practice
  • PJM500 - Project Management
  • PJM530 - Contracts, Procurement, and Risk Management
  • PJM535 - Project Metrics, Monitoring, and Control
  • PJM580 - Capstone: Project Management
  • OPS510 - Operations Management
Completed at least 2 of the following:
  • PJM525 - Business Analysis
  • PJM540 - Agile Project Management
  • PJM560 - Project Management Office (PMO)

Note: Some Master of Project Management students may also be required to take RES501 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, the degree is 39 credits.

The PJM595 Project Management Practicum provides students with practical experience in project management. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Master of Science in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

The Masters of Science in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning degree will advance the knowledge of professionals in the areas of programming, artificial intelligence, computer vision, and machine learning. Students will gain a detailed understanding of software development, artificial intelligence, and machine learning principles, and how they can be used to create a representation our world for deeper critical analysis. They will also gain the ability to study scenarios and apply appropriate techniques for data analysis and processing, and an understanding of the principles associated with applying machine learning techniques to various areas in computer science and information technology. Additionally, students are provided with the technical capabilities to apply mathematical, statistical, and programming techniques in the realm of artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Use principles and techniques associated with software development.
  • Apply artificial intelligence principles as needed for a given problem or scenario.
  • Apply machine learning principles to solve a specific problem or scenario.
  • Develop solutions that are capable of modeling human behavior.
  • Implement a solution that combines artificial intelligence and machine learning principles.
  • Evaluate the performance of applications in artificial intelligence and machine learning domains.

Specific Admission Requirements

Students applying for this degree must have taken an advanced course in Discrete Mathematics and an advanced course in Probability and Statistics. Students who do not meet this requirement can seek admission with the Program Director's approval. Students admitted with approval from the Program Director who did not meet the requirements will be required to take one or both of the following CSU Global pre-requisite coursework or equivalent:

  • MTH350 – Discrete Mathematics
  • MIS446- Statistics for Data Analytics Using R

To meet prerequisite requirements for admission, students must complete the above coursework within 12 months of starting and maintain a 3.0 grade point average. Students should reference the provisional admissions policy in the university catalog for additional admission requirements.

Courses

The Master of Science in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning program consists of ten 3-credit core courses, listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • CSC500 - Principles of Programming
  • CSC501 - Management for the Computer Science Professional
  • CSC502 - Ethical Leadership in Software Development
  • CSC505 - Principles of Software Development
  • CSC506 - Design and Analysis of Algorithms
  • CSC507 - Foundations of Operating Systems
  • CSC510 - Foundations of Artificial Intelligence
  • CSC515 - Foundations of Computer Vision
  • CSC525 - Principles of Machine Learning
  • CSC580 - Capstone: Applying Machine Learning and Neural Networks

Note: Some Master of Science in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning students may also be required to take RES500 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, the degree is 33 credits.

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Master of Science in Data Analytics

Through the Master of Science in Data Analytics program, students are prepared to be strong organizational leaders by using business intelligence and data analytics. Students learn to improve decision-making and business processes in core business functions such as accounting, finance, logistics, management, and strategy through the application of business intelligence solutions and data analytics principles. The importance of data security, privacy, and the ethical treatment of data is enforced. The program demonstrates how to access, extract, transform, integrate, load, validate, and cleanse large data sets. Students learn to evaluate the principles of descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive analytics to address business decisions. Technical topics include data warehousing, data mining and visualization, business analytics, predictive analytics, and enterprise performance management. The program prepares students for careers such as business/systems analysts, business intelligence developers/analysts, ETL developers, data analysts, data architects, and data scientists.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Practice ethical standards of data handling in analytics.
  • Apply policies and procedures to ensure the privacy and security of data.
  • Analyze large data sets.
  • Employ data analytic solutions for business intelligence and forecasting.
  • Evaluate principles of predictive analytics to address business challenges.
  • Articulate analytical conclusions and recommendations in written, verbal, and visual formats.

Specific Admission Requirements

In addition to the institutional graduate admission standards, students seeking admission to the MSDA program must have an undergraduate degree with a major or concentration in management information systems, information technology, computer science, or database management and demonstrate that they have recently (last 5 years) taken at least introductory courses in the following three areas: computer programming, database management, and statistics.


Students who do not meet the above conditions may be admitted provisionally to the program. Courses from the list below may be required to be completed as a prerequisite to the MSDA coursework to build up background knowledge in these areas for students that do not have courses or industry experience in these subjects in the last 5 years:

  • MIS446 – Statistics for Data Analytics Using R
  • MIS407 – Database Concepts

To meet prerequisite requirements for admission, students must complete the above coursework within 12 months of starting and maintain a 3.0 grade point average. Students should reference the provisional admissions policy in university catalog for additional admission requirements.

Students need a computer that has a 64-bit hardware and software platform.

Courses

The Master of Science in Data Analytics program consists of eight 3-credit major courses and either the Advanced Analytics Emphasis or four 3-credit specialization courses in an area of interest to the student. The core courses are listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • MIS500 - Foundations of Data Analytics
  • MIS505 - Data Wrangling
  • MIS510 - Data Mining and Visualization
  • MIS530 - Predictive Analytics
  • MIS535 - Data Reporting & Visualization
  • MIS540 - Introduction to Business Intelligence
  • MIS541 - Data Warehousing in Enterprise Environments
  • MIS581 - Capstone: Business Intelligence and Data Analytics

Note: Some Master of Science in Data Analytics students may also be required to take RES500 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, the degree is 39 credits.


MIS595 is an optional course that provides students with practical data analytics experience. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.



Advanced Analytics Emphasis

The Advanced Analytics Emphasis focuses specifically on the managerial aspects of data analytics and advanced analytics for those who are looking to extend their knowledge of modeling and statistical analysis. 

Courses in the Advanced Analytics Emphasis include:

  • MIS542 - Business Analytics
  • MIS543 - Enterprise Performance Management
  • MIS545 - Advanced Data Analytics
  • MIS560 - Advanced Data Analytics using R

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Master of Science in Management

Students in the Master of Science in Management program are individuals whose careers and management responsibilities transcend a single functional area requiring a broad range of knowledge, skills, and experience in management. The emphasis of this practical management degree program applies to startup, small, and large businesses within both the private and public sectors. Students will prepare for upper management and executive-level positions by developing key managerial competencies—including systems thinking, critical thinking, economic analysis, decision making, international competencies, and ethical leadership applied across a range of industries. This program of study is accredited by ACBSP and academically aligns with the curriculum guidelines of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) which ensures program excellence and professional readiness.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Create management decisions that incorporate strategic planning, competitive intelligence, ethical standards, and global acumen.
  • Interpret information, research findings, and recommendations for organizational stakeholders.
  • Develop solutions to business problems applying qualitative and quantitative analytical reasoning.
  • Synthesize stakeholder relationships and international perspectives to enhance organizational success within a global marketplace.

Courses

The Master of Science in Management program consists of eight 3-credit major courses and four 3-credit specialization courses in an area of interest to the student. The core courses are listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • MGT500 - Organizational Behavior
  • ECN500 - Global Economics
  • PJM500 - Project Management
  • FIN520 - Financial Reporting and Analysis
  • MGT545 - Strategic Planning and Innovation
  • MGT550 - Systems Design
  • MGT576 - Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses and Decision Making
  • MGT579 - Capstone: Management

Note: Some M.S. in Management students may be required to take BUS500 and/or RES500 as part of their coursework if they do not have previous experience/an accredited degree in business courses and/or accounting, finance, or business statistics. In this case, the degree is 39 credits.

Students who do not have a previous business-related degree from an ACBSP-accredited program must complete BUS500 before completing other program requirements. Provisionally admitted students whose undergraduate degrees meet the ACBSP-accredited program requirements will complete RES500 or RES501, rather than BUS500.

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Master of Science in Marketing

The online Master of Science in Marketing program prepares students to advance in a marketing role. The innovative curriculum integrates industry best practices and real-world application to prepare a student for success in a career where data, decisions, and actions are interconnected. Students will complete course work covering all facets of marketing, including marketing strategy, advertising, promotions, sales, digital marketing, analytics, consumer behavior, financial management, and ethics. Please Note - We are no longer accepting new students into this program.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop integrated marketing solutions for organizations by applying appropriate marketing strategies, theories, and techniques.
  • Use data-driven approaches to develop strategies and track results towards achieving marketing goals.
  • Build innovative marketing approaches based on consumer buying behaviors and in-depth analysis.
  • Create advertising, promotional, and selling strategies that build relationships with customers.
  • Demonstrate multichannel communication fluency that engages organizational stakeholders.
  • Evaluate the legal and ethical implications of marketing approaches and campaigns.

Specific Admission Requirements

The Master of Science in Marketing is open for enrollment only on the Burgundy Track. A student without a bachelor’s or graduate degree from a business-accredited (ACBSP, AACSB, or IACBE) program must demonstrate knowledge in accounting, finance, economics, and marketing. This can be achieved by:

  1. Completion of individual courses in each of these areas
  2. Completion of CSU Global’s 3-credit BUS500 (Foundations of Business) course: This course reviews the underlying principles of business topics including marketing, finance, accounting, management, law, economics, ethics, information systems, quantitative methods, and policy within domestic and global perspectives. The broad focus of the course provides students without an undergraduate degree in business a foundation of business terminology and concepts that support entry-level knowledge for graduate-level study.
  3. Completion of a prior learning assessment of the content of BUS500
  4. Completion a similar prerequisite course or program at another institution

Courses

The Master of Science in Marketing program consists of ten 3-credit courses, listed in the suggested order of completion.

  • MKG501 - Strategic Marketing Management
  • MKG502 - Product and Brand Management
  • MKG503 - Global Marketing Management
  • MKG521 - Advanced Marketing Analytics and Research
  • MKG522 - Consumer Insights and Analysis
  • MKG531 - Creative Advertising and Communications
  • MKG532 - Digital Storytelling
  • MKG541 - Strategic Internet Marketing
  • MKG542 - SEM and SEO Marketing
  • MKG581 - Marketing Capstone

Note: Some Master of Science in Marketing students may also be required to take RES501 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, the degree is 36 credit hours. As of Fall 2023, new students are no longer being accepted into this program.



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Master of Science in Military and Emergency Responder Psychology

The Master of Science in Military and Emergency Responder Psychology program will prepare students with the theory and methodology utilized to improve the behavioral health of our military personnel and emergency responders. Students will learn about the essential functions of the organization and personnel structure, unique stressors responders routinely face, adaptation strategies to occupational stress and trauma, as well as research related to resilience and recovery in military and emergency responder personnel. Throughout this program, students will develop a special set of competencies as well as a deep understanding and appreciation for military and responder culture. Upon completion, students will be prepared to apply their skills in a variety of settings often accessed by this population. Please Note - We are no longer accepting new students into this program.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate appropriate ethical behavior and culturally relevant strategies into clinical practice.
  • Explain systemic and environmental factors that impact human development, functioning, and behavior.
  • Compare theories and models of career development in counseling.
  • Apply the clinical assessment process for case conceptualization and treatment planning.
  • Utilize models of culturally competent and trauma-informed interviewing and counseling.
  • Demonstrate an ability to receive and integrate feedback.

Specific Admission Requirements

Students wishing to enroll in the program will meet the following requirements:

  1. Candidates must have completed a bachelor’s degree preferably in a related field (human services, criminal justice, psychology, social work, or similar).
  2. Access to a webcam is required.
  3. Acknowledgment of the practicum and internship requirements.

Courses

The Master of Science in Military and Emergency Responder Psychology is composed of 61 credit-hours, listed in the suggested order of completion and aligned with state of Colorado educational requirements related to pursuing Licensed Professional Counselor Candidacy. Students are provided with the concepts and skills associated with the experiences, psychology and support therapy associated with military personnel and emergency responders. The program includes four courses that review the culture, the operational psychology, and the therapy and support structures required to counsel people in these high-stress occupations. The 600-hour internship requirement and the 100-hour practicum requirement is met through two practicum courses and the four internship courses.

PSY570, PSY571, PSY580. PSY581, PSY585, and PSY586 all require students to carry professional liability insurance.

  • RES510 - Fundamentals of Research and Writing
  • PSY510 - History, Systems, and Philosophy of Military and Emergency Responder Psychology
  • PSY515 - Ethics in Practice
  • PSY520 - Lifespan Development and Generational Issues
  • PSY560 - Substance Abuse
  • PSY535 - Trauma and Crisis Intervention
  • PSY540 - Individual Counseling Techniques and Theory
  • PSY525 - Suicide Prevention and Intervention
  • PSY570 - Counseling Practicum I
  • PSY571 - Counseling Practicum II
  • PSY550 - Performance and Health Psychology
  • PSY545 - Group Interventions
  • PSY530 - Couples and Family Counseling
  • PSY565 - Grief and Loss
  • PSY555 - Military and Emergency Responder Assessment (Pre-Employment, Fitness for Duty, and Return to Duty Evaluations)
  • PSY580 - Counseling Internship 1
  • PSY581 - Counseling Internship 2
  • PSY585 - Counseling Clinical Internship 3
  • PSY586 - Counseling Clinical Internship 4
  • PSY575 - Facilitating Career Counseling
  • PSY590 - Diagnosis and Psychopathology

Please note- We are no longer accepting new students in this program.

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Master of Science in Organizational Leadership

In the Master of Science in Organizational Leadership, students will prepare to lead dynamic organizations through complex changes in today's global society. Students gain the ability to meet organizational needs by developing people and processes, as well as implementing strategic initiatives in order to maintain a competitive advantage. Specific topics include organizational structure, culture, the leadership of diverse teams, decision-making, and communication, as each applies to the business needs of today. Students also have the opportunity to synthesize the knowledge they gain along with established theories and research in order to analyze and evaluate current organizational challenges and to propose solutions for increased effectiveness.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze how individuals and groups interact within organizations.
  • Develop strategies that support stakeholders and enhance organizational capacity.
  • Evaluate how human behavior within organizations affects leadership, communication, ethics, and decision-making.
  • Evaluate lifelong learning to advance a cohesive culture within an organization.
  • Assess the current challenges of organizational leadership in historical and current contexts.
  • Analyze theories of leadership within personal and professional contexts.
  • Justify leadership competencies through organizational leadership theory and practice.
  • Anticipate technological needs within socially responsible organizations.

Courses

The Master of Science in Organizational Leadership program consists of eight 3-credit major courses and four 3-credit specialization courses in an area of interest to the student. The core courses are listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • ORG502 - Effective Organizations: Theory and Practice
  • ORG530 - Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility
  • ORG555 - Leading Diverse Teams
  • ORG561 - Examination of Modern Leadership
  • ORG525 - Decision Theory in a Global Marketplace
  • ORG536 - Contemporary Business Writing and Communication
  • ORG575 - Critical Evaluation of Research and Theory
  • ORG579 - Capstone: Organizational Leadership

Note: Some M.S. in Organizational Leadership Students may be required to take RES501 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, the degree program is 39 credits.

Note: ORG595 is an optional course that provides students with practical management experience. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy Under Admissions Policies.

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Master of Science in Teaching and Learning

The Master of Science in Teaching and Learning program elevates students' leadership attributes and competencies as well as their professional knowledge of designing, developing, and assessing and evaluating learning experiences and educational programs. The MSTL program develops educational leaders through its emphasis on research-based instructional methods and strategies, proven learning theory and science, and leadership models and methods. Through a curriculum that is both rigorous and relevant students gain techniques for the promotion of academic excellence and lifelong learning, as well as learn to analyze and evaluate teaching and learning principles to meet specific educational needs of K-12 and nontraditional learners. CSU Global does not provide educator licensing or endorsement. 

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Integrate learning theories into instructional practices.
  • Design learning experiences that meet the needs of a diverse population.
  • Assess learning using a variety of methods.
  • Utilize data to drive decision-making in educational settings.
  • Examine the use of digital tools relevant to learning environments.

Specific Admission Requirements

The MSTL core courses, Teacher Leadership, and English Language Learner specialization courses are only offered on the Burgundy track.

Vision

Our vision is to cultivate agile, entrepreneurial graduates who exemplify integrity, dedication to the diverse populations they serve, and confidence in their abilities to advocate for and initiate change.

Mission

The MSTL program develops educational professionals and leaders who utilize creativity, innovation, and research-based strategies to improve culture, performance, stakeholder relationships, and partnership activities of their educational organization.

Goals

The MSTL program prepares students through relevant, engaging learning experiences that promote equity, encourage continual professional growth, and foster collaboration skills.

The MSTL program envelops learners in an inclusive online learning environment that reflects and affirms diversity.

The MSTL program empowers educational professionals to elevate their academic achievement as well as professional success.

Courses

The Master of Science in Teaching and Learning program consists of eight 3-credit major courses and four 3-credit specialization courses in an area of interest to the student. The core courses are listed in the suggested order of completion:

  • OTL502 - Learning Theories and Models of Instruction
  • OTL504 - Social, Ethical, and Legal Issues in 21st Century Learning
  • OTL539 - Theory and Practice in Backward Design
  • OTL547 - Evaluation and Assessment
  • OTL545 - Technology and Innovation
  • OTL565 - Cultural Responsiveness in the Differentiated Classroom
  • OTL581 - Capstone: Researching Effective Educational Programming
  • OTL579 - Capstone: Research-Based Professional Project

Note: Some M.S. in Teaching and Learning students may be required to take RES501 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, the degree is 39 credits.

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Master of Science in Teaching and Learning - Education Leadership Principal Licensure Concentration

The Education Leadership Principal Licensure Concentration within the Master of Science in Teaching and Learning program is designed to provide students with the educational leadership skills necessary for being a K-12 assistant principal or principal. The concentration consists of eight courses (24 credit hours) focused on educational leadership and administration. The Principal Licensure Concentration program may be taken as a stand alone certificate or may be used to satisfy the requirement for a graduate level specialization for degree seeking students in the MS of Teaching and Learning program. The Master of Science in Teaching and Learning with the Principal Licensure Concentration is a 39-credit hour graduate degree program that consists of five core courses (15 credit hours) in the Teaching and Learning major and the eight courses (24 credit hours) in the Principal Licensure Concentration.

The Principal Licensure Concentration program is aligned with the Professional Standards for School Leaders, the Colorado Principal Quality Standards, and the Colorado English Language Learner Standards. These combined standards provide for theoretical and practical administrative learning experiences that encourage collaborative, innovative, and creative leadership skills and attitudes necessary for today's diverse and complex school environments. Upon completion of the concentration, students will have the skills required to nurture and sustain an equitable school culture for students and staff, establish relationships with internal and external stakeholders of benefit to the school community, and identify learning gaps and design solutions to improve student achievement. Students will apply evidenced-based leadership and learning principles through an internship experience that is embedded within each of the EDL courses in the program. Students will also collaborate with a Principal Mentor within their own schools.

The certifying agent for the completion of the Principal Licensure Concentration, whether as part of a degree- or non-degree seeking program of study, is the CSU Global Registrar. Eligibility for licensure in the State of Colorado will be indicated on the official transcript.

*Principal Licensure requirements vary from state-to-state. This program was established and approved based on the eligibility requirements for the State of Colorado only. Students are solely responsible for verifying their own state's specific requirements from their state’s Department of Education.

Vision

Our vision is to cultivate educational leaders who are prepared to lead K-12 schools with integrity, confidence, and the ability to effectively utilize data-driven decision making processes for strategic planning with a focus on continual improvement.

Mission

The Principal Licensure Concentration program provides students with the required experiences, skills, dispositions and aptitudes to successfully lead in K-12 schools. Our program emphasizes equity, reflective practice, research-based and relevant curriculum, reciprocal partnerships, innovative learning technologies, and leadership development.

Goals

1. Principal Candidates will engage in studies that require critical thinking and field work in K-12 schools that prepare them for the work as educational leaders.

2. Principal Licensure Concentration graduates will have had a positive academic experience, recommend our program to other aspiring educational leaders, and serve as advocates for the University.

3. Principal Licensure Concentration alumni will obtain licensure and have the skills and knowledge necessary to be successful, confident first-year leaders in their schools.

4. Principal Licensure Concentration alumni will progress in their career with a focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion and demonstrate a strong commitment to their school community.

5. Principal Licensure Concentration alumni will be leaders in their field, return to serve as Principal Mentors in the program, and will continue to make positive impacts in their districts, schools, and communities.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Utilize data to drive decision making.
  • Demonstrate educational leadership dispositions.
  • Develop strategies to promote an inclusive learning environment.
  • Evaluate stakeholder relationships needed to support the diverse needs of a learning community.
  • Design change initiatives to ensure compliance with regulatory expectations.

Specific Admission Requirements

In addition to CSU Global’s graduate degree admissions requirements, students interested in completing the Principal Licensure Concentration must complete additional provisions. The following documents must be submitted through the Student Portal no later than 14 days prior to start of the term in which the student wishes to enroll in EDL500:

  • A copy of the student’s current teaching license.
  • Vision statement defining their view of “great school leadership".
  • A resume that provides documented evidence of 2 or more years of full-time successful experience working as a licensed or certified professional in a public or non-public elementary or secondary school in the United States, additional professional employment, leadership skills, special skills, publications, exhibitions, awards, and service activities.
  • A reference letter completed by a school administrator indicating that the student has the skills and disposition to be an effective school leader.
  • Identification of internship location and Principal Mentor as all mentors need to be approved and trained before classes start.

The Education Leadership (EDL) courses are only offered on the Burgundy track.

Courses

The Master of Science in Teaching and Learning with a Principal Licensure Concentration program consists of thirteen 3-credit core courses, listed in the suggested order of completion. During each education leadership course (EDL) students will also be interning 6-8 hours per week, implementing both State standards and leadership dispositions.

  • OTL502 - Learning Theories and Models of Instruction
  • OTL547 - Evaluation and Assessment
  • OTL545 - Technology and Innovation
  • OTL565 - Cultural Responsiveness in the Differentiated Classroom
  • EDL500 - Strategic Leadership
  • EDL520 - Instructional Leadership
  • EDL530 - School Culture and Equity Leadership
  • EDL540 - Human Resource Leadership
  • EDL550 - Managerial Leadership
  • EDL560 - External Development Leadership
  • EDL510 - School Leadership Internship
  • OTL568 - Action Research
  • OTL579 - Capstone: Research-Based Professional Project

Note: Some M.S. in Teaching and Learning students may be required to take RES501 as part of their program if they have an undergraduate GPA below 3.00. In this case, the degree is 42 credits.

OTL568 and EDL510 may be taken as corequisites.

EDL510 may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Graduate Certificates

CSU Global offers credentialed graduate certificates that may be declared as a single program of study. Students interested in certificate programs must meet standard admissions requirements. Certificates may be financial aid eligible. Please contact a Student Success Counselor with any questions regarding these programs.

Students interested in certificate programs should have a firm knowledge of the basic competencies indicated by the learning outcomes. This includes knowledge of specialized terminology, work flow, or technology. A previous exposure to curriculum may be necessary for student success.

Graduate Certificate in Business Analytics

The Graduate Certificate in Business Analytics is a 12 credit-hour stand-alone certificate. Students who would like to broaden their skills in designing, developing, and implementing enterprise-level business analytics solutions for decision-making purposes will benefit from this certificate. Through this coursework, students cover an entire spectrum of business analytics, including foundations of data analytics, data mining and visualization, predictive analytics, and business analytics. Students interested in these courses should have experience or recent course work in programming and statistics, as well as, the ability to grasp and understand the fundamental principles of business analytics. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate the tools used by successful business analytics leaders.
  • Apply data mining and predictive analytics to large data sets providing patterns, trends, and relationships.
  • Demonstrate the principles of descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive analytics.
  • Communicate business analytics through visualization and reporting.
  • Provide analytical solutions that enable organizational leadership to make informed decisions and forecasts.

Specific Admission Requirements

In addition to the institutional graduate admission standards, students seeking admission to the Graduate - Business Analytics Certificate must demonstrate that they have knowledge in the following areas: computer programming and statistics. Students entering this certificate must complete the exam within MIS444 to demonstrate this knowledge and achieve a satisfactory score.
Students need a computer that has a 64-bit hardware and software platform.

Courses

  • MIS500 - Foundations of Data Analytics
  • MIS510 - Data Mining and Visualization
  • MIS530 - Predictive Analytics
  • MIS542 - Business Analytics

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Graduate Certificate in Cyber Security

The Graduate Certificate in Cyber Security provides advanced knowledge for the practical application of securing data and protecting digital assets. IT professionals will learn to mitigate malicious cyber activities through the implementation of security solutions within local and enterprise infrastructures by focusing on topics such as security management, risk and vulnerability controls, data encryption, and cybercrime prevention. Coursework aligns with seven of the 10 Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)® domains. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate internal and external threats and vulnerabilities to data assets in the enterprise and provide recommendations to mitigate or eliminate areas of weakness.
  • Compare and contrast the concepts of security and privacy, and explain how the imperatives for each may compliment or interfere with the imperative for the other.
  • Describe and analyze the implications of major emerging technology trends, issues, and threats to the security and privacy of networks and information.
  • Analyze possible threats to organizational data and recommend course(s) of action to mitigate cybercrime attacks.
  • Analyze a network for vulnerabilities to common cyber-based attacks.

Courses

  • ISM527 - Cyber Security Management
  • ISM529 - Emerging Cyber Security Technology, Threats, and Defense
  • ISM530 - Enterprise Cyber Security
  • ISM531 - Cyber Security Defense and Countermeasures

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Graduate Certificate in Digital Health Technology

The Graduate Certificate in Digital Health Technology is designed for students who want to explore the expanding role of digital health information in health systems both nationally and globally. Digital health technologies utilize computing platforms, connectivity, software, devices, and sensors for health care and related exchanges of medical information. These technologies span a wide range of interfaces, from device applications to support general wellness management to applications used on medical devices. Students will analyze trends in digital health technology, applications, challenges, and opportunities for healthcare organizations preparing to move into the future of digital healthcare.



Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate the drivers of digital health technology from the perspective of administrative and clinical information requirements needed to improve the support of data-driven services such as telemedicine and telehealth.
  • Determine the challenges and barriers encountered when adopting digital and health information system technologies using project management strategic planning to achieve interoperability.
  • Evaluate the different types of data analytics used in the creation of knowledge to support clinical and organizational decision-making to improve patient outcomes and safety.
  • Critique the use of emerging technologies to increase access to medical care for underserved medical populations.
  • Compare the leadership strategies needed to achieve value, performance, and patient engagement goals established by regulations and standards.
  • Investigate the benefits and risks of Artificial Intelligence (AI) used in healthcare analytics to support data security, quality, integrity, and accuracy in the documentation required for medical coding and reimbursement for services provided.

Specific Admission Requirements

  • Bachelor’s degree in Healthcare Administration, Nursing, or other healthcare discipline, from an accredited institution.
  • Bachelor’s degree in an alternate program (IT, PJM), with two or more years of healthcare employment.
  • Cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.00 or higher.

Courses

  • HCM570 - Healthcare Information Systems
  • HCM555 - Health Informatics & Population Health Analytics
  • DHT506 - Technology and Health Informatics
  • DHT510 - Emerging Technologies and the Future of Health Innovation

Current MHA students will substitute the HCM570 core program course with one (1) of the following courses - ISM525, ISM545, ISM530, or ISM521.

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Graduate Certificate in Educational Leadership -- Principal Licensure

Our vision is to cultivate educational leaders who are prepared to lead K-12 schools with integrity, confidence, and the ability to effectively utilize data-driven decision-making processes for strategic planning with a focus on continual improvement. Mission: The Principal Licensure Concentration program provides students with the required experiences, skills, dispositions and aptitudes to successfully lead in K-12 schools. Our program emphasizes equity, reflective practice, research-based and relevant curriculum, reciprocal partnerships, innovative learning technologies, and leadership development.


Goals

1. Principal Candidates will engage in studies that require critical thinking and field work in K-12 schools that prepare them for the work as educational leaders.

2. Principal Licensure Concentration graduates will have had a positive academic experience, recommend our program to other aspiring educational leaders, and serve as advocates for the University.

3. Principal Licensure Concentration alumni will obtain licensure and have the skills and knowledge necessary to be successful, confident first-year leaders in their schools.

4. Principal Licensure Concentration alumni will progress in their career with a focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion and demonstrate a strong commitment to their school community.

5. Principal Licensure Concentration alumni will be leaders in their field, return to serve as Principal Mentors in the program, and will continue to make positive impacts in their districts, schools, and communities.


Program Learning Outcomes

Utilize data to drive decision making.

Demonstrate educational leadership dispositions.

Develop strategies to promote an inclusive learning environment.

Evaluate stakeholder relationships needed to support the diverse needs of a learning community.

Design change initiatives to ensure compliance with regulatory expectations.


Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Validate, nurture, and sustain a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.
  • Manage the organization, operation, and resources of a school to create a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.
  • Collaborate with stakeholders to develop systems and relationships to engage and leverage resources, from within and outside the school, to maximize the school's ability to successfully implement initiatives that better serve the diverse needs of students.
  • Create and utilize processes to empower leadership teams that support change and encourage improvements consistent with policies, laws, and agreements.

Specific Admission Requirements

In addition to CSU Global’s graduate degree admissions requirements, students interested in completing the Principal Licensure Concentration must complete additional provisions. The following documents must be submitted through the Student Portal no later than 14 days prior to start of the term in which the student wishes to enroll in EDL500:


  • A copy of the student’s current teaching license.
  • Vision statement defining their view of “great school leadership.”
  • A resume that provides documented evidence of 2 or more years of full-time successful experience working as a licensed or certificated professional in a public or non-public elementary or secondary school in the United States, additional professional employment, leadership skills, special skills, publications, exhibitions, awards, and service activities.
  • A reference letter completed by a school administrator indicating that the student has the skills and disposition to be an effective school leader.
  • Identification of internship location and Principal Mentor as all mentors need to be approved and trained before classes start.

Courses

  • EDL500 - Strategic Leadership
  • EDL510 - School Leadership Internship
  • EDL520 - Instructional Leadership
  • EDL530 - School Culture and Equity Leadership
  • EDL540 - Human Resource Leadership
  • EDL550 - Managerial Leadership
  • EDL560 - External Development Leadership
  • OTL568 - Action Research

Note: EDL510 may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. During each Principal Licensure course, students will also be interning 6-8 hours per week, implementing the principal effectiveness standards that they are learning, in the school in which they are currently teaching.


OTL568 and EDL510 may be taken as corequisites.


This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Graduate Certificate in Human Resource Management

Students in the Graduate Certificate in Human Resource Management, a 12 credit-hour stand-alone program, will study the theory and applications necessary to integrate the human resource role with the strategic goals of an organization. Students will learn to manage people in today’s global and dynamic marketplace effectively. Students will develop the applied skills to manage, train strategically, and develop human resources for enhanced organizational performance. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Identify the strategic role of the human resource function in facilitating the accomplishment of an organizational mission, goals, and objectives through the creation of aligned organizational systems and practices.
  • Understand the principles and values associated with creating high performance and high trust work systems within a rapidly changing global environment.
  • Develop skills required to measure organizational performance and to create human resource systems essential for monitoring, improving, and rewarding performance consistent with an organizational culture.
  • Identify the global issues affecting human resource management and develop the skills to address complex issues associated with effectively managing people in a global context.

Courses

  • HRM500 - Managing Human Resources
  • HRM515 - Legal and Human Resource Dimensions of Business Management
  • HRM540 - Strategic Workforce Planning and Advancement
  • HRM560 - Talent Development

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Graduate Certificate in Project Management

Students in the Graduate Certificate in Project Management, a 12 credit-hour stand-alone program, students will gain the business and management skills to evaluate, synthesize, analyze, and apply the concepts required when leading unique projects within the context of large, global organizations. Students will acknowledge and apply project management best practices throughout the program in the critical project management knowledge areas. Students will study advanced topics, including PMO, risk management, business analysis, and project monitoring and performance metrics. This certificate program is eligible for financial aid. 

This specialization includes topic areas, practical skills, and knowledge aligned to professional certifications offered by Project Management Institute (PMI)®.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Employ the knowledge and skills needed to solve organizational problems using a systematic decision-making approach.
  • Apply advanced project management and organizational principles and skills to successfully implement projects.
  • Execute effective planning and control strategies and best practices for time, cost, scope, quality, and risk management, to ensure of project success.
  • Critically analyze the environment in executing projects within a global marketplace.

Courses

Complete the following:
  • PJM500 - Project Management
  • PJM530 - Contracts, Procurement, and Risk Management
Completed at least 2 of the following:
  • PJM535 - Project Metrics, Monitoring, and Control
  • PJM540 - Agile Project Management
  • PJM560 - Project Management Office (PMO)

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Graduate Licensure Programs

The certifying agent for the completion of these Licensure programs is the Colorado State University Global Campus Registrar. Eligibility for licensure is indicated on the official transcript upon completion.

Graduate Licensure Program in Education Leadership Principal Licensure

The Education Leadership Principal Licensure is designed to provide students with the academic leadership skills necessary for being a Principal. The program is aligned with the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders and the Colorado Principal Licensure Standards. These defined standards provide outcomes that are fundamental for educational leaders to have in today's complex schools including: vision, instructional leadership, management, community collaboration, integrity, and comprehension of educational context in our society. Students will apply these principles and objectives in practical academic settings both in the coursework and through an ongoing internship experience integrated into all the courses of this concentration.


This state-approved, online principal licensure program consists of eight courses for a total of 24 credit hours. This program is also offered as a concentration within the Master of Science in Teaching and Learning. Due to state authorization this program may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy regarding internships and practica, under Admissions Policies. Any possible graduate-level transfer credit requires Program Chair approval to be applied for course credit.

Certificate Learning Outcomes

  • Facilitate the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a learning vision shared and supported by educational stakeholders.
  • Validate, nurture, and sustain a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.
  • Manage the organization, operation, and resources of a school to create a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.
  • Collaborate with stakeholders to develop systems and relationships to engage and leverage resources, from within and outside the school, to maximize the school's ability to successfully implement initiatives that better serve the diverse needs of students.
  • Create and utilize processes to empower leadership teams that support change and encourage improvements consistent with policies, laws, and agreements.

Specific Admission Requirements

Students interested in completing the Principal Licensure Concentration must complete additional provisions. The following documents must be submitted through the Student Portal no later than 14 days prior to start of the term in which the student wishes to enroll in EDL500:


• A copy of the student’s current teaching license.
• Vision statement defining their view of “great school leadership.”
• An identity history summary that includes a Declaration of Eligibility.
• A resume that provides documented evidence of 2 or more years of full-time successful experience working as a licensed or certificated professional in a public or non-public elementary or secondary school in the United States, additional professional employment, leadership skills, special skills, publications, exhibitions, awards, and service activities.
• A reference letter completed by a school administrator indicating that the student has the skills and disposition to be an effective school leader.

Courses

  • EDL500 - Strategic Leadership
  • EDL520 - Instructional Leadership
  • EDL530 - School Culture and Equity Leadership
  • EDL540 - Human Resource Leadership
  • EDL550 - Managerial Leadership
  • EDL560 - External Development Leadership
  • EDL510 - School Leadership Internship
  • OTL568 - Action Research

Note: OTL568 and EDL510 may be taken as corequisites.


EDL510 may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies.

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Graduate Specializations

Students must complete a specialization that consists of four graduate courses (12 semester hours of credit) as a supplement to their program major. Specializations allow students to select a series of courses in a career-relevant area based on professional/personal interests.

Not all specializations are available for all degree programs. See the Master’s Degree Specialization Chart for more information. Students should consult the requirements for their specific degree program prior to starting specialization coursework. Students should complete most major courses for their program (except the capstone prep and capstone project) before taking specialization courses.

Once a student has completed all the courses within a specialization, they can request a non-transcribable Certificate of Completion to be mailed to them prior to the completion of their degree. Students should contact their Student Success Counselor for more information.

Graduate Specialization for English K-12 Educators

The following 18 credit-hour sequence of proposed graduate level English coursework is designed to provide existing K-12 English teachers with the graduate-level credit in composition, rhetoric, critical analysis & literature necessary to be qualified to teach dual enrollment courses. These graduate-level courses will be designed with the assumption that interested students have completed an Undergraduate 24+ credit hour sequence, or a passing score on the required PRAXIS subject area, or a bachelor's degree or higher in the subject area. For those teachers requiring a master’s degree, 12 credits of the English sequence can be applied toward the MS in Teaching & Learning degree at CSU Global.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop a comprehensive thesis and literature review that incorporates research and argues an informed position concerning an academic issue within the current literature of English language & literature studies.
  • Critically evaluate personal bias within the current literature of English language and literature studies.
  • Critically evaluate the work of seminal and key critics within the current literature of English language and literature studies.
  • Critically evaluate the impact of race, class, and gender within the current literature of English language and literature studies.
  • Develop a graduate-level academic writing process that incorporates research, pre-writing strategies, annotated bibliographies, annotated outlines, peer reviewing, working with Smarthinking and the Writing Center, revision and proofreading strategies, and MLA formatting.

Specific Admission Requirements

English K-12 Educators specialization courses in order of completion:

English K-12 Educators specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • ENG501 - Studies in Composition Studies and Pedagogy
  • ENG510 - Literary Criticism and Theory
  • ENG515 - History and Theory of Rhetoric
  • ENG520 - Advanced Studies in World Literature
  • ENG525 - British Romantic Literature
  • ENG532 - American Literature WWI to Present

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Graduate Specialization for History K-12 Educators

The following 18 credit-hour sequence of graduate level History coursework is designed to provide existing K-12 teachers with the graduate-level credit in history necessary to be qualified to teach dual enrollment courses. These graduate-level courses will be designed with the assumption that interested students have already completed a 24 credit-hour sequence of undergraduate courses or passed a PRAXIS exam in the area or have a bachelor’s degree in a related field. For those teachers requiring a master’s degree, 12 credits of the History sequence can be applied toward the MS in Teaching & Learning degree at CSU Global.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop a framework for understanding historical movements and constructs.
  • Critically evaluate personal biases within the current approaches to history.
  • Synthesize current research focused on the use of primary documents in historical studies.
  • Develop a graduate-level academic writing process that incorporates research, pre-writing strategies, annotated bibliographies, annotated outlines, peer reviewing, working with online tutoring services and the Writing Center, revision and proofreading strategies, and APA formatting.

Courses

  • HST500 - Topics in U.S. History
  • HST501 - Topics in Latin American History
  • HST502 - Topics in the History of Colonialism
  • HST503 - Topics in U.S. Colonial History
  • HST504 - Topics in U.S. Immigration History
  • HST505 - Topics in the History of US Wars and Warfare

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Graduate Specialization for Math K-12 Educators

The following 18 credit-hour sequence of proposed graduate level Mathematics coursework is designed to provide existing K-12 math teachers with the graduate level credit in mathematics necessary to be qualified to teach dual enrollment courses. These graduate-level courses will be designed with the assumption that interested students have already completed an Undergraduate 24+ credit hour sequence, or a passing score on the required PRAXIS subject area, or a bachelor's degree or higher in subject area. For those teachers requiring a master’s degree, 12 credits of the math sequence can be applied toward the MS in Teaching & Learning degree at CSU Global.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop a comprehensive understanding of Discrete Mathematics, Higher Calculus and Differential Equations, Higher Geometry, Mathematical Modeling and Advanced Probability.
  • Critically evaluate the current research focused on advanced mathematical & statistical studies.
  • Appraise and critique current pedagogy utilized in mathematics instruction for secondary and undergraduate mathematics education.
  • Examine high-level proofs and solutions to mathematics problems and design lesson plan modules to relay that information to students in secondary and undergraduate mathematics education.
  • Assemble a teaching portfolio of advanced mathematics lesson plans that use the current, best pedagogy.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is only available to students in the Master of Science in Teaching and Learning program. Math K-12 Educators specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is only available to students in the Master of Science in Teaching and Learning program. Math K-12 Educators specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • MTH525 - Discrete Mathematics
  • MTH530 - Foundation and Applications of Analysis I
  • MTH531 - Foundation and Applications of Analysis II
  • MTH540 - Higher Geometry
  • MTH545 - Mathematical Modeling
  • MTH556 - Advanced Probability and Statistics

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Graduate Specialization in Accounting

Students must complete a specialization that consists of four graduate courses (12 semester hours of credit) as a supplement to their program major. Specializations allow students to select a series of courses in a career-relevant area based on professional/personal interests. Not all specializations are available for all degree programs. See the Master’s Degree Specialization Chart for more information. Students should consult the requirements for their specific degree program prior to starting specialization coursework. Students should complete most major courses for their program (except the capstone prep and capstone project) before taking specialization courses. Once a student has completed all the courses within a specialization, they can request a non- transcribable Certificate of Completion to be mailed to them prior to the completion of their degree. Students should contact their Student Success Counselor for more information.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Acquire advanced accounting knowledge for candidates seeking to sit for the Uniform CPA Examination.
  • Demonstrate advanced accounting skills to be used in real-world, practical situations.
  • Explain relevant topics in accounting related to current global issues.
  • Apply critical-thinking skills to solve complex accounting and tax problems.
  • Develop advanced accounting knowledge and skills necessary to become an immediate productive member of an organization.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available for students in all graduate programs except the following: M.S. in Teaching and Learning and Master of Professional Accounting. Accounting specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is available for students in all graduate programs except the following: M.S. in Teaching and Learning and Master of Professional Accounting. Accounting specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • ACT506 - Advanced Accounting II
  • ACT510 - Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination
  • ACT550 - Advanced Income Taxation
  • ACT560 - Accounting Ethics

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Graduate Specialization in Applied Business Management

This specialization facilitates students’ acquisition of skills needed for effective managerial acumen, including knowledge of human resource topics, concepts related to strategic planning, communication strategies and knowledge of financial principles. This specialization is available to all graduate degree options.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate human resource policies and regulatory influences on business decisions.
  • Appraise theories and decision processes to support organizational success.
  • Synthesize internal and external factors of strategic management to optimize organizational positioning and competitiveness in today’s dynamic marketplace.
  • Analyze the elements, principles, barriers, and levels of strategies surrounding effective managerial communication.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to all graduate students, except for those in the Master of Professional Accounting program. Applied Business Management specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is available to all graduate students, except for those in the Master of Professional Accounting program. Applied Business Management specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • FIN500 - Principles of Finance
  • MGT510 - Strategy Planning
  • MGT535 - Global Managerial Communication
  • HRM515 - Legal and Human Resource Dimensions of Business Management

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Graduate Specialization in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

The Graduate Specialization in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning will provide students with necessary skills in the areas of programming, artificial intelligence, computer vision, and machine learning. This specialization will provide students will the ability to analyze and associate artificial intelligence principles into scenarios that are used in representing reasoning and uncertainty in a perceptive environment. Students will learn how to utilize techniques that can be used for image analysis and deconstruction, and how to apply statistical techniques to build models that can provide for accurate representations of knowledge uncertainty for a given scenario. Finally, students will gain the ability to apply knowledge in artificial intelligence and machine learning in order to implement holistic solutions for a given problem or scenario.


Students applying for this specialization must first undergo a review by the program chair and have taken both an advanced course in Discrete Mathematics and an advanced course in Statistics for Data Analytics or equivalent. Students who do not meet this requirements, must complete the requirements prior to registering for any core courses. Students will be allowed to enroll in the program, but must complete any pre-requisite as their initial courses in the program. Students in the Master of Business Administration program are not able to take this specialization. CSU Global pre-requisite coursework is:

  • MTH350 Discrete Mathematics
  • MIS446 Statistics for Data Analytics Using R

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Identify principles and techniques associated with search methods in artificial intelligence.
  • Evaluate the effects of uncertainty in a probabilistic setting using artificial intelligence techniques.
  • Analyze technical mechanisms used to deconstruct an image for modeling.
  • Apply techniques that can be used to represent uncertainty in a system.
  • Implement machine learning models for a given scenario.

Specific Admission Requirements

Completion of the following two pre-requisites

  • MTH350 Discrete Mathematics
  • MIS446 Statistics for Data Analytics Using R

Completion of the following two pre-requisites

  • MTH350 Discrete Mathematics
  • MIS446 Statistics for Data Analytics Using R

Courses

  • CSC505 - Principles of Software Development
  • CSC506 - Design and Analysis of Algorithms
  • CSC510 - Foundations of Artificial Intelligence
  • CSC525 - Principles of Machine Learning

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Graduate Specialization in Business Intelligence

In this specialization students are prepared to be organizational leaders by using business intelligence and business analytics. Students learn to convert data into information that organizations can use to meet strategic objectives. Students demonstrate the tools and techniques used for collecting, analyzing, transforming, and visualizing data into functional business knowledge for informed decision-making in an enterprise organization. Students focus on providing knowledge that allows enterprises to improve performance and remain competitive. Students interested in this specialization should have experience or recent course work in programming and statistics.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Explain the impact of business intelligence in enterprise organizations.
  • Apply analytic results to operational function improvement.
  • Utilize business intelligence tools and techniques including visualization to inform organizational leadership.
  • Communicate analysis to allow informed business decisions and improved performance.
  • Use tools to mine data from large data sets.

Specific Admission Requirements

In addition to the institutional graduate admission standards, students seeking to take the Business Intelligence Specialization must demonstrate that they have knowledge in the following areas: computer programming and statistics. Students entering this certificate must complete the exam within MIS444 to demonstrate this knowledge and achieve a satisfactory score. Students need a computer that has a 64-bit hardware and software platform.

In addition to the institutional graduate admission standards, students seeking to take the Business Intelligence Specialization must demonstrate that they have knowledge in the following areas: computer programming and statistics. Students entering this certificate must complete the exam within MIS444 to demonstrate this knowledge and achieve a satisfactory score. Students need a computer that has a 64-bit hardware and software platform.

Courses

  • MIS540 - Introduction to Business Intelligence
  • MIS510 - Data Mining and Visualization
  • MIS542 - Business Analytics
  • MIS543 - Enterprise Performance Management

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Graduate Specialization in Creative and Digital Marketing

Creative and Digital Marketing specialization is designed to equip students with an understanding of the rapidly changing landscape of the digital age of marketing. This specialization combines the fundamental principles of marketing, with cutting edge techniques and strategies that use AI, creative content development, digital media and data driven marketing analytics. Students will gain the knowledge and skills required to be successful in digital marketing and creative content development. 

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop effective digital marketing strategies.
  • Align digital marketing efforts with organizational goals.
  • Design Video, Graphics and written content.
  • Use SEO to evaluate performance.
  • Develop e-commerce strategies using mobile marketing techniques.

Courses

  • MKG531 - Creative Advertising and Communications
  • MKG532 - Digital Storytelling
  • MKG541 - Strategic Internet Marketing
  • MKG542 - SEM and SEO Marketing

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Graduate Specialization in Criminal Justice Leadership

This specialization is designed to provide professionals in criminal justice organizations with fundamental knowledge and insight. The coursework is focused on the key factors needed for effective industry leadership and decision-making: ethics, policy development, management, and criminology theory. Please Note - We are no longer accepting new students into this specialization.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss ethical issues facing criminal justice organizations and personnel.
  • Analyze the influences of leadership and management on criminal justice organizational culture.
  • Analyze the policy and political implications of criminal justice administration and leadership.
  • Assess criminological theories and understand the relationship between theory and practice.

Specific Admission Requirements

 Criminal Justice Leadership specialization courses in order of completion:

 Criminal Justice Leadership specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • CRJ500 - Criminological Theory
  • CRJ530 - Ethics, Justice and Social Control
  • CRJ540 - Criminal Justice Policy Development and Analysis
  • CRJ550 - Administration and Management of Criminal Justice Organizations

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Graduate Specialization in Cyber Security

The Cyber Security specialization provides advanced knowledge for the practical application of securing data and protecting digital assets. IT professionals will learn to mitigate malicious cyber activities through the implementation of security solutions within local and enterprise infrastructures by focusing on topics such as security management, risk and vulnerability controls, data encryption, and cybercrime prevention.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze network infrastructure vulnerabilities.
  • Determine recommendations to mitigate possible attacks of network resources.
  • Evaluate enterprise network systems in order to streamline secure operations.
  • Compose an alternative operations strategy in the event of computer-related attacks.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of secure transmission and encryption methodologies for secure enterprise networking.
  • Implement security strategies that defend organizations from cybercrime.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is only available to students in the M.S. in Data Analytics and the Master of Information Technology Management programs. Cyber Security specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

This specialization is only available to students in the M.S. in Data Analytics and the Master of Information Technology Management programs. Cyber Security specialization courses are listed in order of completion:

Courses

  • ISM527 - Cyber Security Management
  • ISM529 - Emerging Cyber Security Technology, Threats, and Defense
  • ISM530 - Enterprise Cyber Security
  • ISM531 - Cyber Security Defense and Countermeasures

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Graduate Specialization in English Language Learning

This specialization is designed to prepare Pre-K-12 classroom teachers to work with linguistically diverse learners with an emphasis on ELL methodology, linguistics, literacy, assessment, and compliance. CSU Global does not provide educator licensing or endorsement. 

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Integrate fundamental knowledge in phonetics, phonemics, morphology, syntax, and linguistics as they are applied to English Language Learners.
  • Understand and integrate key theories of language acquisition to linguistically diverse educational settings.
  • Gain an understanding of the federal and state laws and court decisions that have determined the schools' obligation toward the education of English Language Learners.
  • Develop and evaluate instructional plans that are aligned with state and national standards for English Language Learners.
  • Develop the ability to assess ELL students using English Language Proficiency Assessments and classroom-based assessment methods.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is only available for students in the M.S. in Teaching and Learning program. English Language Learning specialization courses in the order of completion:

This specialization is only available for students in the M.S. in Teaching and Learning program. English Language Learning specialization courses in the order of completion:

Courses

  • ELL500 - English Language Learners
  • ELL505 - Language Acquisition and Linguistics
  • ELL520 - Literacy and the English Language Learner
  • ELL530 - Assessment and Administration of ELL Programs

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Graduate Specialization in Finance

This specialization is designed to develop leadership, international perspectives, and operational skills in finance by focusing on career development that incorporates state-of-the-art nontraditional and emerging electronic formats.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Produce organization and community leaders with solid analytical and financial decision-making skills.
  • Ensure that students demonstrate the ability to adapt to changing global business environments.
  • Develop superior oral and written communication skills essential in the business environment.
  • Provide a solid foundation in ethical standards for financial decision-makers and leaders in finance.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available for students in all graduate programs except the M.S. in Teaching and Learning, the Master of Finance, and the Master of Professional Accounting programs. Finance specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is available for students in all graduate programs except the M.S. in Teaching and Learning, the Master of Finance, and the Master of Professional Accounting programs. Finance specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • FIN510 - Financial Economics
  • FIN520 - Financial Reporting and Analysis
  • FIN560 - Derivatives and Asset Pricing
  • FIN575 - International Financial Management

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Graduate Specialization in Fraud and Financial Crimes

This specialization is designed to meet the educational needs of those with responsibility for fraud investigation and prevention. The courses prepare individuals with theory, law, and analytical techniques to protect the financial interest of government agencies, companies and individuals.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze the many different types of fraud.
  • Discuss the global impact of fraud.
  • Describe the legal framework and issues for fraud management and investigation.
  • Apply computer-aided fraud data analysis.
  • Determine various investigative tactics and techniques for conducting fraud investigations.
  • Apply tools and methods of fraud investigation.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available for students in all graduate programs except those in the Master of Business Administration program. Fraud Management specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is available for students in all graduate programs except those in the Master of Business Administration program. Fraud Management specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • CRJ555 - Fraud Examination and Prevention
  • CRJ556 - Criminal Justice and Legal Concepts of Fraud
  • CRJ557 - Fraud Investigation
  • CRJ558 - Fraud Data Analysis

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Graduate Specialization in Global Management

This specialization facilitates students’ awareness of topics present in managing with knowledge of diverse human resource and communication concerns, knowledge of technology infrastructures, including risks and benefits related to technology, and the importance of supporting infrastructures, framed within the diverse field of managerial decision responsibilities focused on a dynamic and future perspective.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Apply the principles and theories of human resources to assess HR needs from a global perspective.
  • Leverage the value of technology to support organizational success.
  • Evaluate decision frameworks that incorporate aspects of diversity
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the multiple levels and forms of communication within an organizational environment.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs, except the M.S. in Teaching & Learning, the Master of Information Technology Management, and the Master of Professional Accounting. Global management specialization courses are in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs, except the M.S. in Teaching & Learning, the Master of Information Technology Management, and the Master of Professional Accounting. Global management specialization courses are in order of completion:

Courses

  • MIM560 - International Business
  • MIM530 - Technology Management in the Global Economy
  • ORG525 - Decision Theory in a Global Marketplace
  • MGT535 - Global Managerial Communication

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Graduate Specialization in Healthcare Administration

This specialization provides a working understanding of the healthcare industry from critical analysis and leadership perspectives. The coursework is focused on key tools and knowledge needed for effective leadership of healthcare-related organizations.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop an awareness of the policies, procedures, laws, and ethics found in the healthcare industry.
  • Synthesize past and current models of healthcare for application in healthcare settings for optimum efficiency and productivity.
  • Acquire the knowledge and skills needed to identify and solve healthcare industry-related problems using systematic decision-making.
  • Critically analyze the problems, solution alternatives, and the environment to develop and execute strategies within the healthcare industry.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except the M.S. in Teaching and Learning, the Master of Healthcare Administration, and the Master of Professional Accounting, and Master of Business Adminstration programs. Healthcare Administration specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except the M.S. in Teaching and Learning, the Master of Healthcare Administration, and the Master of Professional Accounting, and Master of Business Adminstration programs. Healthcare Administration specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • HCM500 - The U.S. Healthcare System
  • HCM520 - Quality and Performance Improvement in Healthcare
  • HCM542 - Healthcare Operations Management
  • HCM565 - Healthcare Finance
  • HCM570 - Healthcare Information Systems

Please note that students must choose either HCM565 or HCM570. Students are not required to take both courses.

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Graduate Specialization in Human Resource Management

Students in the graduate, Human Resources Management specialization, will study the theory and applications necessary to integrate the human resource role with the strategic goals of an organization. Students will learn to manage people in today’s global and dynamic marketplace effectively. Students will develop the applied skills to manage, train strategically, and develop human resources for enhanced organizational performance.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate the strategic role of the human resource function in facilitating the accomplishment of an organizational mission, goals, and objectives through the creation of aligned organizational systems and practices.
  • Synthesize the principles and values associated with creating high performance and high trust work systems within a rapidly changing global environment.
  • Assess organizational performance and to create human resource systems.
  • Select techniques to address and manage global issues affecting human resource management.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except Human Resource Management, and the Master of Professional Accounting.

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except Human Resource Management, and the Master of Professional Accounting.

Courses

  • HRM500 - Managing Human Resources
  • HRM515 - Legal and Human Resource Dimensions of Business Management
  • HRM540 - Strategic Workforce Planning and Advancement
  • HRM560 - Talent Development

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Graduate Specialization in Human Resources Performance

Organizations, whether private or public, face an increasing need to improve their effectiveness. Successful organizations will be those that anticipate change and develop strategies in advance. Students in this specialization will study the critical elements that contribute to high performance and organizational effectiveness, all within the framework of an organized labor employee base. Students will be provided with skills and insights into managing organized labor employees in dynamic environments.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze the need and processes for enhancing organizational performance and human capital.
  • Evaluate criteria for performance excellence in dynamic environments.
  • Synthesize the role of leadership and strategic planning in performance management.
  • Develop processes for effective human resource policies.
  • Evaluate the technological impact on HRM practices.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except Human Resource Management, and the Master of Professional Accounting. Human Resource Performance specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except Human Resource Management, and the Master of Professional Accounting. Human Resource Performance specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • HRM500 - Managing Human Resources
  • ORG561 - Examination of Modern Leadership
  • HRM540 - Strategic Workforce Planning and Advancement
  • HRM550 - Strategic Labor Relations

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Graduate Specialization in Information Technology

The graduate specialization in Information Technology provides managers with the advanced knowledge of Information Technology in industries that depend on the effective use and management of Information Technology. The curriculum in the IT specialization places more emphasis on the management and effective utilization of information management ensuring organizations gain or maintain a competitive advantage using IT. The Information Systems Technology Specialization is designed for students that have a desire to pursue or elevate their career as an IT Manager, Director, or Senior Executive in Information Technology Management.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • The ability to align business and IT objectives for a common strategic direction that promotes operational efficiency/technological dominance.
  • Evaluation of cutting edge technology as well as the current industry standard with an analysis of the impacts on the organization.
  • Serve as the lead for flexible, sustainable, and efficient enterprise-wide IT infrastructure solutions that add value to the organization.
  • Communicate IT plans and recommendations to C-Level executives on technological solutions that foster competitive advantages in the workplace.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except the Master in Information Technology Management program, the Master of Finance, the Master of Human Resource Management, the M.S. in Teaching & Learning, the Master of Professional Accounting, and the Master of Business Administration programs. Information Technology specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except the Master in Information Technology Management program, the Master of Finance, the Master of Human Resource Management, the M.S. in Teaching & Learning, the Master of Professional Accounting, and the Master of Business Administration programs. Information Technology specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • ISM501 - IT Management
  • ISM511 - Managing Virtualized and Cloud Systems
  • ISM521 - Managing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems
  • ISM561 - Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery

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Graduate Specialization in International Management

The graduate specialization in International Management is designed to support students for international management career opportunities within multinational industries and organizations. Today’s dynamic global marketplace requires well-prepared graduates with strong managerial skills and understanding of culture business issues that contribute to the international business community. Upon completion of the program, CSU-Global graduates will be prepared to confront challenges and seek strategic opportunities within the structure of global commerce.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop comprehensive strategic business plans for global expansion.
  • Analyze competitive markets and the economic and political factors that affect them.
  • Recommend strategies to support principles of corporate sustainability, social responsibility, and ethics within a global environment.
  • Synthesize concepts related to regulatory requirements, economic theories and business decisions.

Specific Admission Requirements

International Management specialization courses in order of completion:

International Management specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • MIM500 - Business Strategy in the Global Economy
  • MIM510 - International Trade
  • MIM520 - Global Financial Management
  • MIM560 - International Business

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Graduate Specialization in Online Learning Innovation and Design

The Online Learning Innovation and Design specialization develops leaders in the field of online education. Students will gain specific knowledge and skills in creating and applying instructional design theory and integrating new learning technologies geared to create a powerful and engaging learning experience. Areas of study include the practical application of innovative and original instructional delivery, virtual learning environments, and evaluation of learning outcome achievement. CSU Global does not provide educator licensing or endorsement. 

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze online delivery methods and develop virtual learning environments.
  • Recognize learning contexts and design appropriate learning solutions to achieve desired goal.
  • Prepare, execute, and evaluate instructional design strategies that address diverse work settings.
  • Create optimal learning experiences by identifying critical environmental considerations, diverse learning needs, and organizational goals.
  • Apply theory, practices, and new learning technologies to the creation of innovative learning solutions.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is only available to students in The M.S. in Management, the M.S. in Organizational Leadership, the M.S. in Teaching & Learning and the Master of Human Resource Management programs:

This specialization is only available to students in The M.S. in Management, the M.S. in Organizational Leadership, the M.S. in Teaching & Learning and the Master of Human Resource Management programs:

Courses

  • OTL531 - Models of Instructional Delivery
  • OTL540 - Instructional Theory and Design Principles
  • OTL541 - Assessment and Evaluation in Learning and Performance
  • OTL542 - Learning Technologies

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Graduate Specialization in Organizational Leadership and Change Management

This program is designed to equip and empower mid-to senior level managers for future corporate growth in the fast-paced and technologically driven reality of today’s marketplace. The program is ideal for established, mature managers who need new skills and a facilitated learning environment to acquire the knowledge and insights necessary to compete in a global economy over the next decade. The program enhances a manager’s ability to learn and adapt to new ideas and new perspectives, while providing them with the critical thinking and evaluative skills vital to market innovation and adaptation.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate the application of leadership theories within an organizational system.
  • Synthesize the application of management theory through leadership and the human application within organizations.
  • Analyze and integrate innovation and identify where change and innovation create opportunity.
  • Examine the human issues of managing and leading in a global society.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except for the M.S. in Organizational Leadership, the Master of Professional Accounting, and the Master of Business Administration. Organizational Leadership and Change Management specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except for the M.S. in Organizational Leadership, the Master of Professional Accounting, and the Master of Business Administration. Organizational Leadership and Change Management specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • ORG525 - Decision Theory in a Global Marketplace
  • ORG550 - Executives in Organizations
  • ORG515 - Leadership Power in Organizations
  • ORG561 - Examination of Modern Leadership

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Graduate Specialization in Organizational Learning and Performance

The Organizational Learning and Performance specialization prepares students to effectively create and drive training and development programs that are critical for the success of today's global workplaces. Students will learn to apply essential learning strategies and instructional design techniques in order to increase performance and accomplish organizational goals. Key topics include performance and delivery systems, assessment and evaluation, the use of learning technologies, and strategic planning and leadership.


This Specialization has been aligned to the Certified Professional in Learning & Performance (CPLP) certification offered by ATD (the Association of Talent Development). CSU Global does not provide CPLP certification or educator licensure.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Prepare strategies for developing, managing, and leading learning programs.
  • Identify key concepts, principles, and trends influencing workplace learning.
  • Analyze and apply assessment and evaluation techniques to qualitative and quantitative measure the results of various learning programs.
  • Utilize diverse learning technologies to achieve desired learning goals.
  • Create learning solutions the address changing demographics in employee and customer bases.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except the Master of Professional Accounting and the Master of Business Administration programs. Organizational Learning and Performance specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except the Master of Professional Accounting and the Master of Business Administration programs. Organizational Learning and Performance specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • OTL520 - Adult Learning: Theory and Practice
  • OTL541 - Assessment and Evaluation in Learning and Performance
  • OTL542 - Learning Technologies
  • OTL544 - Leading the Learning Strategy

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Graduate Specialization in Population Health

In this specialization, students will be provided with a comprehensive foundation in the essentials of population health — new care-delivery structures, socioeconomic determinants of disease, data analytics, and identifying Community Health Needs. This program will enable students to enhance their skills in population health to lead and manage complex population healthcare programs and services.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze the structure of the U.S. healthcare system and its impact on population health outcomes.
  • Assess new priorities and requirements in prevention, evidence-based practice, comparative effectiveness, public health, and health policy established by the population health framework.
  • Evaluate how health information systems support and inform data analytics, decision-making, and workflow within and across healthcare settings.
  • Discuss how population health programs and initiatives are advanced by identifying community health needs and managing costs and to improve access, quality, and safety.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except the M.S. in Data Analytics, the M.S. in Teaching & Learning, the Master of Criminal Justice, the Master of Professional Accounting, and the Master of Business Administration programs. Population Health specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except the M.S. in Data Analytics, the M.S. in Teaching & Learning, the Master of Criminal Justice, the Master of Professional Accounting, and the Master of Business Administration programs. Population Health specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • HCM505 - Principles of Population Health
  • HCM532 - Healthcare Change Management, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship
  • HCM555 - Health Informatics & Population Health Analytics
  • HCM575 - Population Health Program Assessment, Implementation, and Evaluation

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Graduate Specialization in Project Management

Students in the Project Management specialization will gain the business and management skills to evaluate, synthesize, analyze, and apply the concepts required when leading unique projects within the context of large, global organizations. Students apply project management best practices throughout the program in the critical project management knowledge areas. Students will study advanced topics, including PMO, risk management, business analysis, and project monitoring and performance metrics.

This specialization includes topic areas, practical skills, and knowledge aligned to professional certifications offered by Project Management Institute (PMI)®.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Solve organizational problems using a systematic decision making approach.
  • Apply advanced project management and organizational principles and skills to successfully implement projects.
  • Execute effective project planning and control strategies and best practices for time, cost, scope, quality, and risk management to ensure of project success.
  • Critically analyze the environment in executing projects within a global marketplace

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except the Master of Project Management, the Master of Business Administration, and the Master of Professional Accounting programs. Project Management specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is available to students in all graduate programs except the Master of Project Management, the Master of Business Administration, and the Master of Professional Accounting programs. Project Management specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

Complete the following:
  • PJM500 - Project Management
  • PJM530 - Contracts, Procurement, and Risk Management
Completed at least 2 of the following:
  • PJM535 - Project Metrics, Monitoring, and Control
  • PJM540 - Agile Project Management
  • PJM560 - Project Management Office (PMO)

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Graduate Specialization in Strategic Innovation and Change Management

This specialization provides students with knowledge of the innovation process and implementation of innovation-supporting techniques that support agility and change within organizations. Specific topics include managing and leading dynamic organizations, theories of motivation and change, communication systems and processes that support agility and success, product development, and management topics related to talent development of employees.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Apply methods and processes to support employee selection and development.
  • Analyze and integrate innovation, and identify where change and innovation create opportunity.
  • Synthesize the application of management theories to support healthy organizations.
  • Explore the components and integration of effective methods for communication that support both domestic and global organizations.

Specific Admission Requirements

Strategic Innovation and Change Management specialization courses in order of completion:

Strategic Innovation and Change Management specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • MGT571 - Strategic Product Innovation
  • ORG515 - Leadership Power in Organizations
  • MGT535 - Global Managerial Communication
  • MIM560 - International Business

Note: Students in the Master of Organizational Leadership program will take MIM530 instead of MGT535.


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Graduate Specialization in Teacher Leadership

Students will gain the skills needed to lead in the classroom, institution, and within larger contexts through policymaking. Students will employ existing knowledge in teaching and learning to advance the concept of teachers as change agents to share experiences and insights with policy makers, educators, and other stakeholders with an emphasis on PreK-12. CSU Global does not provide educator licensing or endorsement.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Facilitate the role of educators in promoting change to improve teaching and learning.
  • Develop the skills needed to effectively lead in enhancing educational systems and institutions.
  • Combine the strategies and theories for collaboration and teamwork to advocate change.
  • Integrate key components of learning and knowledge transfer.

Specific Admission Requirements

This specialization is only available for students in the M.S. in Teaching and Learning program. Teacher Leadership specialization courses in order of completion:

This specialization is only available for students in the M.S. in Teaching and Learning program. Teacher Leadership specialization courses in order of completion:

Courses

  • OTL505 - Educational Systems and Change
  • OTL510 - Teacher Leadership
  • OTL515 - Teacher as an Instructional Change Agent
  • OTL560 - Facilitating Learning and Transfer

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CSU Global Graduate Specializations

Courses of Instruction

Accounting

 

ACT300 - Principles of Accounting and Analytics
Course Description
Students will demonstrate understanding of accounting standards and practices in preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial transactions relevant to businesses in today’s world of automation, business intelligence, and data analytics. Primary emphasis is on the financial accounting system for sole-proprietorships and the procedures for recording, summarizing, reporting, and interpreting results of business activities. This course will cover the development of basic financial accounting statements, ethical considerations, and the application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT301 - Financial Accounting
Course Description
This course is intended for the user of financial information. This course is for non-Accounting majors. The goal of the course is to provide the tools for making more informed business decisions. Included are an analysis of the various financial statements, their use, and limitations in making business decisions. A detailed analysis of the components of the financial statement and their economic impact on wealth creation for the organization is emphasized.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT325 - Principles of Accounting and Decision Analysis
Course Description
This course expands on financial accounting concepts presented in ACT300 Principles of Accounting and Analytics. Using automation, students will take a systematic approach in analyzing financial and nonfinancial data to assist managers and other users of accounting information in the decision-making process of an organization. Concepts presented include managerial accounting concepts of cost flows through a business, cost accounting systems, cost-volume-profit analysis (CVP), product costing, capital budgeting, operational budgets, variance analysis, performance measurement, balanced scorecard, content and preparation of the statement of cash flows, and financial statement analysis. Recommended Prior Course: ACT300.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT350 - Intermediate Accounting I
Course Description
This course provides a comprehensive study of accounting principles and financial statements using automation, business intelligence, data analytics, and other digital technologies in performing measurement and valuation related to the assets and current liabilities on the balance sheet. Students will develop an understanding of the intersection of artificial business intelligence with financial reporting and the codification of accounting standards. Students will use automation in financial statement analysis through the interpretation of data and financial statement disclosures. Students will analyze real-world situations through case studies, research accounting and automation concepts, and apply IFRS standards to GAAP standards. Students will present an assessment of the effect each standard may have on a situation, communicate findings, and facilitate workplace solutions in a team-based environment. Recommended Prior Course: ACT325
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT360 - Intermediate Accounting II
Course Description
This course extends knowledge gained in ACT350 involving measurement and valuation related to the assets and current liabilities on the balance sheet and provides a comprehensive study of accounting principles and financial statements using automation, business intelligence (BI), data analytics, and other digital technologies in performing measurement and valuation related to the liabilities and stockholders’ equity section of the balance sheet. Students will develop an understanding of the conceptual framework of financial reporting, the codification of accounting standards, financial statement analysis including the interpretation of data and financial statement disclosures. Students will analyze real-world cases, research accounting concepts, apply IFRS standards to GAAP standards and present an assessment of the effect that each standard may have on a situation, communicate findings, and facilitate workplace solutions in a team-based environment. Recommended Prior Course: ACT350
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT406 - Business Intelligence in Taxation
Course Description
This course covers the federal income tax laws, regulations, and tax policy for individuals, partnerships, corporations, non-profits, estates, and trusts as it relates to accounting and artificial intelligence (AI). Students will demonstrate mastery by preparing tax returns using the most recent tax preparation software and conduct research covering tax issues such as tax planning, tax reform, and ethical considerations. Recommended Prior Course: ACT350.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT410 - Government and Non-Profit Accounting
Course Description
This course introduces specialized accounting standards for governmental and not-for-profit entities using artificial intelligence (AI) applications. Students will develop an understanding of the financial reporting and analysis of state and local governments, governmental operating statement accounts and budgetary accounting, accounting for general capital assets and capital projects. Additional concepts include specialized accounting practices for various types of non-governmental, not-for-profit organizations. Recommended Prior Course: ACT350.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT425 - Information Systems for Accounting
Course Description
This course provides a hands-on approach using information systems in accounting. Students will apply automation using artificial intelligence (AI), predictive analytics, and other digital technologies in performing business functions, communicate findings, and facilitate workplace solutions in an accounting information system. Recommended Prior Course: ACT350.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT450 - Auditing
Course Description
This course offers a study of systematic process of external financial statements and management assertion verification and reporting. Students will examine internal and external auditing processes through the application of artificial intelligence (AI). Students will develop an understanding of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX), IFRS implications, internal controls, risk assessments, and professional ethics and legal liability. Based on current trends in the auditing profession, students will use software programs used extensively in the auditing profession to analyze data. Students will complete a simulation involving an independent audit of a company to include statistical sampling involving current AI technology. Recommended Prior Course: ACT350.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT460 - Cost Analysis and Automation
Course Description
This course incorporates advanced topics in managerial accounting using automation and business intelligence (BI). Topics include decision-making, budgeting, performance evaluation, costing methods, activity-based costing (ABC), profit analysis, forecasting, and variance analysis. Students will use case analysis and simulations of real-world situations involving current business intelligence (BI) technology to identify solutions for managerial decision-making. Recommended Prior Course: ACT325.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT465 - Forensic Accounting and Business Valuation with Artificial Intelligence
Course Description
This course introduces the fundamentals of forensic accounting and business valuation in the world of artificial intelligence. Students will develop an understanding of fraud examination, fraud investigation, litigation support services, and business valuation approaches and methods. Students will examine the role of artificial intelligence in fraud detection, business valuation, and learn how to apply techniques used to collect and analyze data and communicate findings through business valuation reporting. Prerequisite: ACT460.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT470 - Advanced Accounting
Course Description
This course focuses on the use of business intelligence (BI) in accounting practices and procedures involved with special accounting and reporting situations for corporations and partnerships. Students will develop skills in analyzing business combinations, financial statements consolidations, accounting and analysis of international transactions, measurement and translation of financial statements of foreign subsidiaries, foreign currency accounting, and hedging; accounting for partnerships; and corporations in financial difficulties. Recommended Prior Course: ACT360.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT480 - Capstone: Accounting Research and Analysis
Course Description
In this capstone course, students will complete Capstone Assignments to demonstrate and apply learning accumulated throughout the Bachelor of Science in Accounting program. Students will apply leadership, critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and creativity to real-world situations in the era of artificial intelligence. Prerequisite: All core and specialization courses.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT495 - Accounting Practicum
Course Description
This course is designed for students to participate on the staff of an accounting firm or in the accounting function of a business or non-business organization as an opportunity to demonstrate application of skills learned in the Bachelor of Science in Accounting program under the supervision of both faculty and accounting personnel. Assignments are designed to combine theory and professional practice and include weekly journals; a mid-term conference with the instructor, faculty internship coordinator, and on-site supervisor; and a final report. Prerequisite 3 Core Courses.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT500 - Managerial Accounting
Course Description
This course is recommended for users of accounting information. The course explores financial and managerial accounting concepts and principles. The course starts with an overview of financial accounting fundamentals including the basic financial statements’ structure and analysis. This course continues with an emphasis on applying managerial accounting concepts for effective financial decision making in the strategic planning process.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT506 - Advanced Accounting II
Course Description
This course advances a student's knowledge of various accounting principles included in the Uniform CPA Examination. Students will gain a complex understanding of mergers, acquisitions, and consolidations. Students will explore foreign currency concepts and reporting, derivatives accounting, hedge accounting, Regulation S-X and Regulation S-K reporting, and XBRL business reporting.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT510 - Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination
Course Description
This course explores various types of fraud and methods to prevent and deter fraudulent occurrences in a financial environment. The course examines the motivations of fraud perpetrators and the ways to reduce, prevent, detect, and deter fraud. The course also covers fraud, theft act, concealment, and conversion investigation methods. The various ways organizations and victims of fraud can follow-up, litigate, and recover fraud losses will be covered.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT520 - International Accounting
Course Description
This course provides a thorough survey of international accounting practices and principles. Students learn the differences in accounting thoughts, practices, and principles among accounting standards such as the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and the U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (US GAAP). Other topics in the course include foreign currency translation, national and international financial statements, international transfer pricing, international taxation issues, ethical implications associated with accounting standards and reporting systems, and strategic accounting problems and issues for multinational corporations.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT550 - Advanced Income Taxation
Course Description
This course covers components of the Uniform CPA Examination Regulation (REG). The course is an in-depth study of advanced corporate, flow-through entities, not-for-profit entities, transfers, and trust taxation. Students will learn how corporations, partnerships, S corporations, and limited liability companies are taxed. Students will also explore the potential tax effects on not-for-profit entities. Gift and estate taxation, tax planning strategies, multi-jurisdictional taxation, and the IRS administrative procedures for entities will be examined. Recommended prerequisites: ACT406 or equivalent.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT551 - Advanced Tax Policy and Research
Course Description
The course focuses on utilization of tax research tools and development of an understanding of tax policy issues arising from economic policies, social policies, and the profession. Using cases and other materials, students will learn concepts such as the hierarchy of tax authorities, tax research methodologies, tax policies and laws, recent trends in taxation, and develop effective accounting presentation and communication skills. Recommended Prior Course: ACT406 or equivalent and ACT550.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT555 - Advanced Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting
Course Description
This course covers a portion of the Financial Accounting and Reporting section of the Uniform CPA Examination. The course explores the financial accounting and reporting framework concepts such as the theories and application of authoritative guidance, rules, and regulations as they apply to government and not-for-profit entities. The course highlights the similarities and differences in the methods and procedures of government, for-profit, and not-for-profit entities.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT557 - Advanced Fraud Investigations and Forensic Accounting
Course Description
This course teaches students about types of fraud, documents, sources of evidence, and analysis of internal and external fraud schemes. Emphasis is on the skills needed to identify and investigate fraud as well as the typology and investigative processes associated with an array of white-collar crimes. Students learn tools and techniques for investigating criminal cases including search warrants, civic injunctions, and forfeiture.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT558 - Fraud and Forensic Accounting Data Analysis
Course Description
This course focuses on computer-assisted analytical techniques for fraud detection and investigation. An emphasis is placed on data solutions and the application of analytical techniques for preventive, detective, and corrective controls.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT560 - Accounting Ethics
Course Description
This course examines current ethical and professional standards required of accountants and Certified Public Accountants. It includes theories used to predict human behavior and applies these theories to the AICPA Code of Professional Conduct and other codes of accounting practice. Students will learn ethical reasoning, objectivity, independence, integrity, and professionalism and how these elements apply to real-world situations. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT570 - Advanced Cost Accounting
Course Description
This course focuses on the managerial and cost accounting concepts tested on the CPA Examination. It assists students in their ability to use cost and financial data in the planning, management, and controlling functions of an organization. Emphasis is on the budget process; utilization of internal and external data for control and performance analysis; financial, non-financial and non-GAAP measures of performance; current period and historical analysis; prospective analysis; investment alternatives' analyses and comparisons using financial valuation decision models; and economic and market influences on business . The course incorporates data analytic techniques and other data and technology concepts to explain organizational results and to identify and detect discrepancies.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT575 - Advanced Auditing and Assurance Services
Course Description
This course explores components of the audit and information systems core of the Uniform CPA Examination. The course provides in-depth auditing concepts to help students prepare for the related portion of the CPA exam. The major concepts covered are ethics, professional responsibilities, and general principles required of auditors; assessing risk and developing a planned response; performing audit procedures and obtaining evidence to support audit opinion; and forming conclusions and reporting. The course provides students with the opportunity to incorporate data analytics into audit procedures and prepare audit reports for presentation.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT576 - Internal Auditing
Course Description
This course provides foundational knowledge of internal auditing concepts as it relates to reviewing, testing, and evaluating an entity’s operations from an internal perspective. The course examines risk management, governance and controls, and the use of information technology in fighting fraud. The course will explore the mandatory guidance from the International Professional Practices Framework (IPPF), and tools and techniques for conducting internal audit engagements. From a management perspective, the course covers the strategic and operational roles of managing the internal audit function.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT577 - Advanced Information System Audit
Course Description
This course is a survey of control and auditing techniques employed in computer-based accounting systems. It focuses on the Information Technology (IT) audit for public accountants. The course emphasizes on accounting information systems and standard business process cycles. Students learn about IT asset protection and security audit procedures. Topics include audit of Cloud Systems, asset protection, security protocols of administrators, as well as users and systems operators. Integrated into the course will be the use of tools such as a flowcharting tool - LucidChart, a computer assisted audit tool-IDEA, and a data visualization tool –Tableau.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT580 - Capstone: Accounting
Course Description
This Capstone course focuses on applying and synthesizing accounting concepts related to financial accounting, applications, and financial statements presentations. In this culmination of the student's learning throughout the Master of Professional Accounting program, students apply accounting research tools to current accounting issues, provide an overview of an accounting program, and demonstrate their ability to make sound financial decisions. Prerequisite: All major courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ACT595 - Accounting Internship
Course Description
This course is designed for students to demonstrate the Master of Professional Accounting program's learning outcomes under the supervision of both faculty and organizational personnel (internship supervisor). Assignments, which include weekly journals, a mid-term conference with the instructor and internship supervisor, and final report reviewing the internship experience, are designed to combine theory and professional practice. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite: 3 Core Courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Biology

 

BIO121 - Environmental Conservation
Course Description
Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary field that encompasses human interaction with the Earth's ecology, and the relevance of natural resources, pollution, climate change, and energy. The course begins with an introduction to natural sciences and current viewpoints, then builds further on the above concepts to emphasize interconnection. The course concludes by examining applications and decisions individuals can make to live responsibly and sustainably. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education [Natural & Physical Sciences] lecture without lab requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course [GT-SC2] for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

BIO121L - Environmental Conservation Lab
Course Description
Environmental Science Lab provides a practical introduction to the Scientific Method and its application in the laboratory to questions about the natural world. Basic principles of ecology and current issues relating to biodiversity, natural resources, energy, and environmental problems are addressed. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education [Natural & Physical Sciences] lab requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course [GT-SC1] for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 1

 

BIO200 - Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab
Course Description
BIO200 is the first of a two-course sequence. It pertains to a systematic review of the structure and functioning of the cells, tissues and organs of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems of the human body. At the conclusion of the course, the student will demonstrate a basic knowledge of the structure and function of the human body, interrelationships in systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis in the body. This course fulfills a General Education Natural and Physical Science requirement. This course fulfills an anatomy and physiology for nursing requirement. 
Credit Hours: 4

 

BIO201 - Public Health and the Environment
Course Description
Public Health and the Environment draws content and concepts from the biological sciences and public health administration. You will examine the environmental issues related to active living, food security, housing and health, and social justice. You will also research the relationship between economic, physical, and social environments. In this course, you will develop skills that allow you to study characteristics of the environment that may influence public health. You will apply these lessons to the study of public health research, focusing on current and future problems in a public health proposal. This course fulfills a general education Natural and Physical Science lecture requirement. This is an approved Colorado gtPathways course. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

BIO202 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II with Lab
Course Description
BIO202 is the second of a two-course sequence which covers the endocrine, cardiovascular, circulatory, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. At the conclusion of this course, the student will demonstrate a basic knowledge of the structure and the function of all body systems, as well as an understanding of the role of homeostasis in maintaining an environment compatible with life. This course fulfills a General Education Natural and Physical Science requirement. This course fulfills an anatomy and physiology for nursing requirement. This is an approved Colorado gtPathways course.
Credit Hours: 4

 

BIO204 - Introduction to Microbiology with Lab
Course Description
Students will be introduced to the core concepts of microbiology in this course, including microbial identification, physiology, genetics, and ecology. The interactions between microbes and humans are emphasized by discussion of infectious diseases, immunology, epidemiology, and biotechnology. You will learn the fundamentals of microbiology lab techniques by conducting virtual experiments. This course fulfills a general education Physical and Natural Science lecture and laboratory requirement. This course fulfills the microbiology-for-nursing requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course.
Credit Hours: 4

 

BIO216 - Human Pathophysiology
Course Description
Focuses on the alterations in physiological, cellular, and biochemical processes, the associated homeostatic responses, and the manifestations of disease. Prior knowledge of cellular biology, anatomy, and physiology is essential for the study of pathophysiology. This course fulfills the human pathophysiology for nursing requirement. This course is a General Education Natural and Physical Science elective. Prerequisites: BIO200 and BIO202.
Credit Hours: 4

 

BIO350 - Genetics
Course Description
Through lecture, students will learn basic Mendelian genetics, genetic mapping and population genetics. This course fulfills a general education Natural and Physical Science lecture requirement.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Business

 

BUS499 - Experiential Learning Abroad
Course Description
This elective course is designed to provide direct international business and cultural experience including an international travel component. Course content prepares students to apply and grow their program-specific knowledge within an international business decision-making context. International business models are assessed for how to effectively compete within an international environment. An added focus is placed on developing a career plan outline that incorporates international business preparedness. An interdisciplinary approach encourages improved sensitivity to diverse learning opportunities. The course includes international travel requiring student passports and additional expenditures to cover travel costs. This course was available only in the 2019-2020 Fall-C term.
Credit Hours: 3

 

BUS500 - Foundations of Business
Course Description
This course provides a foundational survey of business topics including marketing, finance, accounting, management, law, economics, ethics, information systems, quantitative methods, and policy within domestic and global perspectives. The broad focus of the course provides students without a business undergraduate degree with foundational background information in business terminology and concepts that support entry-level knowledge for graduate level study. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

BUS599 - Experiential Learning Abroad
Course Description
This elective course is designed to provide direct international business and cultural experience including an international travel component. Course content prepares students to apply and grow their program-specific knowledge within an international business decision-making context. International business models are assessed for how to effectively compete within an international environment. An added focus is placed on developing a career plan outline that incorporates international business preparedness. An interdisciplinary approach encourages improved sensitivity to diverse learning opportunities. The course includes international travel requiring student passports and additional expenditures to cover travel costs. This course was available only in the 2019-2020 Fall-C term.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Business Administration

 

MBA510 - Creating and Implementing Marketing Strategies
Course Description
In this course, students will analyze critical components of marketing strategy including product, price, promotion, place, people, process, and physical evidence. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the impact and importance of branding, customer demographics, value, and the use of data to create and monitor marketing strategies.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MBA520 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
Course Description
In this course, students will develop the skills to understand financial reports and utilize the data provided through financial reporting for strategic decision-making. This includes critiquing the role of capital markets, the relationships of financial states and decision making, using financial statements to evaluate the health and budgeting decisions made by an organization as well as assessing the application of ethical standards in accounting.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MBA530 - Financial Decision Making
Course Description
This course provides a theoretical and practical understanding of key financial concepts in corporate settings including the time value of money, required rates of returns, cost of capital, and the different valuation models of securities. Students explore the role of finance in capital markets and examine financial management such as managing exchange rates and various investment vehicles/tools available to enhance stockholders’ wealth in a competitive global economy. This course helps one weigh the impact of strategic decisions as it relates to the use of financial capital.
Prerequisite: MBA520 Credit Hours: 3

 

MBA540 - Managing Operations and Supply Chains
Course Description
This course examines the principles, practices, and techniques for building business operations and supply chain management systems. Students explore operations, supply chain performance, inventory, and capacity management, and forecasting with a focus on optimization of resources within a continuous improvement perspective. Innovation from the viewpoint of key stakeholders is explored along with compatibility of design principles with the needs of end users.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MBA550 - Data-Driven Decision Making
Course Description
Students in this course will review various approaches to data-driven decision making and examine the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches for strategic management and risk analysis. This course provides a review of data visualization, hypothesis testing, regression analysis, time series analysis, and risk and decision analysis.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MBA560 - Developing and Leading Strategy
Course Description
Students taking this course will examine ethical and legal situations facing marketing managers. Students will learn through exploring case studies, current affairs, and contrasting perspectives. Additionally, students will review ethical and legal considerations surrounding consumption movements, societal trends, consumer responses, and modern and historical perceptions.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MBA570 - Pricing Models and Optimization
Course Description
This course delves into the intricacies of pricing strategies, enabling students to optimize product pricing to achieve profitability while considering market dynamics and consumer behavior. This course covers a range of skills and knowledge areas, from strategic analysis and modeling to pricing optimization techniques and ethical considerations of setting and updating prices over time, preparing students for comprehensive mastery of pricing models and strategies. Topics will include but not be limited to introduction to pricing, models of consumer demand, price segmentation, customized pricing strategies, and the behavioral economics of pricing. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MBA580 - Business Models, Product Roadmaps and Design Thinking
Course Description
Students learn to innovate and develop sustainable business models and map products through design thinking principles, ensuring products align with market needs and create value. The course-level outcomes reflect a comprehensive understanding of business model development, design thinking principles, practical application, critical evaluation, and collaborative leadership skills, all of which are essential for success as a product manager.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MBA590 - Leading Product Strategy Capstone
Course Description
Culminating the experience of this program, the capstone project challenges students to apply their accumulated knowledge and skills to a real-world product management scenario. Working in teams, students devise comprehensive product strategies, considering all aspects from branding to financial implications. This course assesses students' adaptability, strategic thinking, and decision-making skills. As they navigate the simulation, students showcase their ability to adjust product strategies in dynamic settings, mirroring real-world scenarios.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Chemistry

 

CHE101 - Introduction to Chemistry
Course Description
In Introduction to Chemistry, students will cover a broad range of topics from chemistry in our lives to matter, energy, atoms and elements, nuclear chemistry, compounds, reactions, and solution chemistry. Students will apply this theoretical knowledge in applied laboratory experiences. This course fulfills a chemistry for nursing requirement. This course fulfills a general education Natural and Physical Science lecture and laboratory requirement. This is an approved Colorado gtPathways course.
Credit Hours: 4

 

CHE121 - General Chemistry I
Course Description
Through lecture and lab experience, students will demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts in chemistry such as nomenclature, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the periodic table, the electronic structure, bonding, and gas laws. This course fulfills a general education Natural and Physical Science lecture and laboratory requirement. 
Credit Hours: 4

 

CHE122 - General Chemistry II
Course Description
Through lecture and lab experience, students will demonstrate an understanding of the factors that determine the speed and extent of chemical reactions - kinetics, equilibria, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. This course fulfills a general education Natural and Physical Science lecture and laboratory requirement. 
Credit Hours: 4

 

CHE345 - Organic Chemistry I
Course Description
Through lecture and laboratory, students successfully completing the course will demonstrate an understanding of structure, nomenclature, dynamics, spectroscopy, and reactions of organic molecules. Students will also learn classical organic laboratory skills and instrumentation, such as nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared spectroscopy, chromatography, and mass spectroscopy. This course fulfills a general education Natural and Physical Science lecture and laboratory requirement. 
Credit Hours: 4

 

CHE346 - Organic Chemistry II
Course Description
A continuation of CHE345.Through lecture and laboratory, students successfully completing the course will demonstrate an understanding of organic synthesis, organic laboratory skills, alkene and alkyne additions, oxygen functional group reactions, and aromaticity. This course fulfills a general education Natural and Physical Science lecture and laboratory requirement. 
Credit Hours: 4

 

CHE351 - Biochemistry
Course Description
Through lecture and lab experience, students successfully completing this course will demonstrate an understanding of structure and function of biological molecules, metabolism, and energy transduction. This course fulfills a general education Natural and Physical Science lecture and laboratory requirement. 
Credit Hours: 4

 

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Communications

 

COM200 - Effective Oral Communication
Course Description
During this course, students will develop the skills necessary to speak confidently inside and outside the classroom. Close attention to speaking purpose, managing speech anxiety, audience analysis, research, organization, visual aids, delivery, audience participation and self-reflection will help students develop the skills needed to present information clearly and confidently to others in class as well as in work settings. Topics covered also include effective listening skills, providing peer feedback, and speech analysis. This course fulfills a General Education Arts and Humanities requirement.
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM204 - Academic and Career Success
Course Description
In this course, CSU Global students will acquire the skills, knowledge, and abilities intended to help support their course, certificate, degree, and career success. Students cannot take both COM204 and COM304.
Credit Hours: 1

 

COM210 - Interpersonal Communication
Course Description
Students analyze their communication choices strategically. Students improve their presentation, writing, and verbal and nonverbal communication skills, honing abilities to use them in the workplace. By learning guidelines for best practices in workplace communications, students strengthen their leadership abilities and increase their personal effectiveness as communicators. This course replaces COM310 - Interpersonal Communication as of the Fall 2023 Trimester. Students who require COM310 as part of their degree plan are approved to take ORG470 - Leading through Conflict Resolution. This course is a replacement course for COM306 – Interpersonal Communication in the Workplace as of the 19-20 Fall Trimester. Students cannot receive credit for both of these courses. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement.
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM215 - Intercultural Communication
Course Description
This course explores issues related to intercultural communication, including various theoretical and practical aspects of how culture influences communication. We will consider the important roles of context (social, cultural, and historical) in intercultural interactions. By applying and considering various approaches to the study of intercultural communication, we will also come to appreciate the complexity and dialectical tensions involved in intercultural interactions. The course will also apply intercultural communication theories to practical situations (organizations, relationships, business, etc.). This learning process should enhance self-reflection, flexibility, and sensitivity in intercultural communication. This course replaces COM315 - Intercultural Communication as of the Fall 2023 Trimester. Students who require COM315 as part of their degree plan are approved to take HRM470 - Human Resource Management in a Global World. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement.
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM225 - Disagree Better
Course Description
Students in this course will learn healthy conflict styles, tools, and strategies for conflict resolution, including collaboration, mediation, and negotiation--skills that allow people to work with both advocates and adversaries to find solutions to problems. Whether it’s a dinner table conversation that turns to politics or a business negotiation, healthy and respectful conflict management and artful persuasion are tools for everyday life. Learners will also be introduced to major theories of conflict resolution and persuasion and how they can be applied in various scenarios to disagree better. Key topics to be covered in the course include negotiation strategies, efficient and effective persuasion skills, conflict avoidance and resolution, and serving the greater good by disagreeing better.
Credit Hours: 1

 

COM300 - Effective Communication: Research and Writing
Course Description
Identify and examine formats, principles, and research tools necessary for effective written communication. A practical approach for leaders in managing the diversity and dynamics of communication needs to achieve desired results. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Written Communication requirement. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM302 - Principles of Public Relations
Course Description
This course provides an overview of the public relations profession from its historic beginnings to its contemporary role in society. The course also provides a foundation for the public relations sequence by exploring its definitions, history, ethics, principles, strategic planning, and career possibilities.
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM303 - Professional Communications
Course Description
Students will learn public speaking and writing skills for use in the business world. Combining communication theory and skills, students will be able to strategically manage their own communication strategies for success in employment and career building. The course has three components: public speaking, managerial writing, and career growth. Students will master verbal strategies such as elevator pitches; traditional correspondence; electronic and social media writing; and career growth communication, including employment-seeking writing, portfolio building.
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM304 - Academic and Career Success
Course Description
In this course, CSU Global students will acquire the skills, knowledge, and abilities intended to help support their course, certificate, degree, and career success.
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM310 - Interpersonal Communication
Course Description
Students analyze their communication choices strategically. Students improve their presentation, writing, and verbal and nonverbal communication skills, honing abilities to use them in the workplace. By learning guidelines for best practices in workplace communications, students strengthen their leadership abilities and increase their personal effectiveness as communicators. This course is a replacement course for COM306 – Interpersonal Communication in the Workplace as of the 19-20 Fall Trimester. Students cannot receive credit for both of these courses. This course is eligible for Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) credit. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM312 - Public Relations Techniques
Course Description
This course introduces the basic principles associated with writing in a variety of styles and to multiple publics. Students learn how to construct specialized written documents such as backgrounders, biographies, pitch letters, and news releases. Students will also learn the features of effective design and what design options exist.  
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM315 - Intercultural Communication
Course Description
This course explores issues related to intercultural communication, including various theoretical and practical aspects of how culture influences communication. We will consider the important roles of context (social, cultural, and historical) in intercultural interactions. By applying and considering various approaches to the study of intercultural communication, we will also come to appreciate the complexity and dialectical tensions involved in intercultural interactions. The course will also apply intercultural communication theories to practical situations (organizations, relationships, business, etc.). This learning process should enhance self-reflection, flexibility, and sensitivity in intercultural communication. This course is eligible for Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) credit. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM321 - Campaign and Event Planning
Course Description
This course introduces the systematic process of researching, planning, conducting, and evaluating the major elements of both campaigns and events. The course focuses on establishing campaign and event goals, objectives, strategies, and tactics. Students will also analyze public relations campaigns locally, nationally, and internationally.
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM322 - Persuasive Campaigns
Course Description
In this class, students will learn about current-day work in persuasion and advocacy across health communication, corporate communication, human resources, advertising, public relations, interactive media, and media studies. To understand the relationships between theory, research, and practice, students will develop a campaign proposal that is grounded in both academic and original research. Students work collaboratively to create the proposal, which will be a professional document for a portfolio or can be developed as an applied project in advocacy within a field. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM340 - Social Media and Public Relations
Course Description
This course examines the strategic use of social media for public communication. The course applies classic and contemporary theory to new media and technologies. Students will understand the practical knowledge and insights required to establish objectives and strategies, properly select social media platforms to engage publics, and monitor and measure the results of these efforts. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM345 - Digital Communications Content Strategy
Course Description
Students in this course gain an understanding of how content permeates an organization and how, in global organizations and communication scenarios, digital content must scale across borders, cultures, and teams. Students gain experience as authors of content, by working with WordPress as a content management system, as well as gain familiarity with content management software and learn how such applications integrate into a work platform.
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM360 - International Public Relations
Course Description
This course introduces students to the global perspective of public relations. The course focuses on the application of principles, models, and theories associated with international public relations. As public relations practices have changed, so has our need to explore these realms outside our borders. The course focuses on culture, identity, global regulations, communications, and ethical practices in a globalized world. Students will evaluate the moral and ethical implications of international public relations practices. Finally, future professionals will appreciate the opportunities that can be gained in this field despite the complex nature of PR practices across the globe. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM400 - Strategic Communication
Course Description
In this course, students learn crucial theory and practical skills needed to manage issues and crises in a modern global environment. Students will learn about issues management as a process for facilitating communication leadership in organizations in order to mitigate internal and external threats to their organizations. Likewise, they will develop knowledge for matching response strategies to different situations, crises, and stakeholders. Topics covered will include stakeholder relationship management, issues management, crisis leadership, social responsibility, and crisis response strategies. As of 19-20 Fall Trimester, this course is available only to declared BSCOM majors and Strategic Communication specializations. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM410 - Crisis Communication and Issues Management
Course Description
This course introduces students to the heart of strategic communication: organizational reputation and relationship management. Students will apply and expand theory to practice by learning how to make, justify, and assess the impact of organizational decisions on internal and external relationships, corporate image, reputation, ethics, and trust. Recommended Prior Course: COM322. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM412 - Introduction to Healthcare Communication
Course Description
In this course, students will learn about the interdisciplinary area of Health Communication. Students will be able to discuss Healthcare Communication from research-based, practical, and theoretical approaches. Students will analyze the different areas of Healthcare Communication, which include healthcare delivery and promotion. Students will develop messages for healthcare campaigns. Students will discriminate among effective communication practices within a healthcare setting.
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM420 - Strategic Communication of Data Analysis
Course Description
This course teaches the important skills of distinguishing types of data and communicating scientific and mathematical information in presentations by visualizing data. Students will learn ways to systematically collect, analyze, and interpret data, then translate technical, data-driven information to a lay audience. Students will examine how data analytics contributes to the formulation of policy decisions and the subsequent communication to stakeholders. Students will recognize how analytics applies to return on investment (ROI) within any career or field. Students prepare presentations using narrative strategies to create compelling, interesting talks based on data.
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM425 - Communication Conflict and Persuasion
Course Description
This course examines communication and conflict in intrapersonal, interpersonal, intercultural, and organizational contexts. Topics covered include conflict styles and strategies for conflict resolution, including collaboration, mediation, and negotiation. The course also considers the role of persuasion in the management of conflict, particularly its role in successful negotiation. Major theories of conflict resolution and persuasion are also addressed. Recommended Prior Courses: ORG470 and HRM470. As of 19-20 Fall Trimester, this course is available only to declared BSCOM majors and Strategic Communication specializations.
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM455 - Technical Communication
Course Description
This course emphasizes the strategies and formats required for effective written communication in professional and technical fields. The course requires students develop clear, concise writing strategies in various formats (including manuals, proposals, statements, and white papers) geared to appropriate audiences, as well as the use of graphics and technology to effectively communicate technical information. Recommended Prior Course: COM300. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM480 - Capstone: Applied Communication Strategies
Course Description
In this capstone course, students will engage in discussions and complete assignments that address the program outcomes for the Bachelor of Science in Communication. Students will demonstrate what was learned throughout the communication studies program by applying leadership, critical-thinking, problem solving and creativity skills to real-world situations, leading to concrete career opportunities. The course will include using the resources available in the CSU Global Career Center, culminating in developing a career plan and resume. Prerequisite: All core and specialization courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

COM495 - Communications Practicum
Course Description
This course is designed for students as an opportunity to demonstrate program outcomes learned in the B.S. in Communication under the supervision of both faculty and organizational personnel. Assignments are designed to combine theory and professional practice and include weekly journals, a mid-term conference with the instructor, faculty practicum coordinator, and on-site supervisor, as well as a final report reviewing the practicum experience. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite: COM304. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Computer Science

 

CSC200 - Computer Science Fundamentals
Course Description
An introduction to computer science fundamentals, which includes: the ability to identify problem‐solving methods; algorithm analysis and strategy; exploration of computer systems functional components; exploration of the interrelationships between varying computer science concepts; and an overview of information management and information assurance and security. Students get the foundational knowledge of computer science concepts that will be utilized throughout the course of study. Prerequisite: MTH201. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC205 - Logic and Design
Course Description
This course provides students with a broad view of principles and theories of computer programming. This course also provides students an introduction to information management methods and techniques used to solve fundamental computer programming problems. In addition, students learn the relationship between operating system drivers and programming concepts. Students develop an understanding of software engineering methods, processes and techniques used to build software systems using fundamental software development methods and tools. Prerequisite: CSC200.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC300 - Operating Systems and Architecture
Course Description
This course provides an overview of operating systems and system architecture. Primary emphasis is on I/O systems, file systems, storage, loading, security and memory allocation. Multiple operating systems will be explored and applied throughout the course. Students will be able to contrast kernel mode and user mode as they relate to designing and implementing operating systems. Prerequisite: CSC200.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC320 - Programming I
Course Description
This course provides students with the skills needed to become a Java object-oriented programmer. Students will learn to program applications using discrete structures and developing programs that access and update stored information from local databases and servers. Students will also learn the underlying features and use of programming language translation and static program analysis including run-time components such as memory management in different operating system environments.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC372 - Programming II
Course Description
This course provides students with the skills needed to become a Java object-oriented programmer. Students will learn to program applications using discrete structures and developing programs that access and update stored information from local databases and servers. Students will also learn the underlying features and use of programming language translation and static program analysis including run-time components such as memory management in different operating system environments. Prerequisite: CSC320.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC400 - Data Structures and Algorithms
Course Description
This course provides an overview of data structures including arrays, lists, trees, graphs, hashes, and files. Students will apply techniques to analyze algorithms and to compare data structures. Required Prerequisite: CSC372
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC405 - Graphics and Visualization
Course Description
This course provides an overview of foundational computer graphics and visualizations topics. Students will develop an understanding of rendering, foundational modeling, geometric modeling and computer animation in constructing simple organic forms. Primary emphasis will be on using appropriate modeling approaches with respect to space, time complexity and quality of images through the construction of computer graphics/visualizations.  Recommended prior courses: CSC372 and MTH201.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC407 - Advanced Neural Networks
Course Description
This course introduces theories associated with neural networks and neural network models. Students will apply basic principles and methodologies associated with network processing, learning algorithms, and applications. Students will analyze propagation, feedforward networks, perceptrons, and self-organizing networks. 
Prerequisite: CSC410 Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC410 - Artificial Intelligence
Course Description
This course introduces the basic concepts associated with Artificial Intelligence (AI) including heuristic search procedures associated with general graphs. Students will develop an understanding of knowledge representation and techniques associated with AI reasoning with uncertainty with the goal of solving current-day complex problems within an organization. Emphasis will be on applying propositional logic, Bayesian probability analysis, and machine learning concepts to solve computationally-intensive problem. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC415 - Computer Vision
Course Description
This course provides an introduction to concepts involved in the application of computer vision theory. In this course, students will gain an understanding of the use of cameras and projection models for completing image processing. Students will be introduced to various techniques, including filtering, edge detection, segmentation, and clustering.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC425 - Principles of Machine Learning
Course Description
This course offers a thorough exploration of machine learning principles and practical application using Azure technologies. Students will grasp fundamental machine learning concepts and delve into supervised and unsupervised learning. Through hands-on exercises, participants will gain practical insights into model training, validation, and evaluation techniques. The emphasis is on developing practical skills, including utilizing Azure Machine Learning Studio for designing and deploying experiments, implementing feature engineering, and optimizing models for scalability and efficiency in the Azure environment. Upon completion, participants will possess the knowledge and hands-on experience to proficiently navigate and leverage Azure Machine Learning for effective machine learning solutions.
Prerequisite: CSC410 Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC430 - Principles of Robotic Theory
Course Description
This course provides an introduction to the theories associated with robotic systems in computing. Students will gain an understanding of basic principles and methodologies associated with robotics and robot control systems. Students will student robot mechanics, intelligent controls, and dynamics. Prerequisite Course: CSC410. 
Prerequisite: CSC410 Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC435 - Fundamentals of Information Retrieval and Web Searching
Course Description
The course provides an introduction to the processes and principles of information retrieval and web searching. Students will explore problems in natural language processing that apply to web searching and other information retrieval systems. The course will focus on understanding efficient text indexing, document clustering and classification, and machine-learning based ranking.
Prerequisite: CSC410 Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC450 - Programming III
Course Description
This course places a heavy emphasis on students' ability to develop secure and functional computer programs using either Java or C++ programming languages. Students will use programming knowledge to complete programming projects based on real-world scenarios that reflect problems in most organizations. Additionally, students will check the security posture of the code by performing checks during development that will be documented and mitigated. Students will be covering topics and concepts such as ensuring security and functionality of computer programs. Required Prerequisite CSC372. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC460 - Advanced Applications of Information Retrieval and Web Searching
Course Description
The course provides introduces advanced techniques associated with the retrieval of information and searching of documents. Students will explore problems in natural language processing related to the retrieval of information using advanced computing constructs and search system algorithms. The course will focus on the application of efficient scoring, ranking, information retrieval evaluation, and efficient information retrieval models. Prerequisite Course: CSC435.
Prerequisite: CSC435 Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC470 - Software Engineering
Course Description
This course teaches students software assurance best practices and methodologies to protect and defend information and information systems. Students will also learn software integration and testing techniques including black and white box, regression, and unit testing as well as inspection and debugging software in order to maximize value in a business environment. Students will also be exposed to the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) which includes requirements analysis; logic design (UML); physical design, and system maintenance. Prerequisite: CSC450
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC475 - Platform Based Development
Course Description
In this course, students demonstrate a firm understanding of development concepts in multiple environments by designing simple web and mobile applications. Students will analyze specific programming requirements for multiple platforms including: web platforms, mobile platforms, industrial platforms, game platforms, and tactical platforms. Prerequisite: CSC450. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC480 - Capstone: Computer Science
Course Description
This capstone course requires students to apply programming concepts to develop functional and practical programs to address complex problems similar to those that organizations face in the workplace today. The project will include implementation of a software solution designed from an algorithm that follows a project plan and requirements specification that incorporates correct data types; data structures and debugging and testing strategies. Students will use their choice of development platforms (ex. Java or C++) and the integration of external data from a local or server-based data storage system. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC500 - Principles of Programming
Course Description
This graduate course provides a detailed overview of fundamental programming, design and testing concepts. Students are introduced to programming constructs and learn how to plan and create basic programming applications. Students will develop applications using common programming structures, which include: conditional statements, switches, loops, iteration control structures, and arrays. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC501 - Management for the Computer Science Professional
Course Description
In this course, students will be prepared to analyze organizational issues surrounding programming, network and software development, and propose the necessary solutions to address business needs. Students gain a detailed understanding of how to manage, oversee, plan and maintain technical personnel and resources. Students will also learn how to effectively relay technical information to all stakeholders in an organization. Topics include management principles for programmers and development specialists, technical communications, organizational leadership, risk management, project management, and systems maintenance. Students will prepare for cross-functional positions in team and industry settings in this course. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC502 - Ethical Leadership in Software Development
Course Description
In this course, students will learn about the ethical considerations and issues programmers and software developers encounter in the workplace related to data, electronic communication, and information security. Students will evaluate and interpret current policies and regulations and formulate their own policies based on these models. Students will also discuss the implications for ethical decisions by technical professionals and leadership utilizing Case Studies and Problem-based learning. Students will learn best practices in ethical decision-making for the work place in this course. Prerequisite: CSC501 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC505 - Principles of Software Development
Course Description
This graduate course provides students with an integrated and detailed approach to programming and software development principles. Students will understand the purpose of object-oriented software topics and pertinent software development principles. Topics included for this course focus on core programming concepts, data structures, methods, classes, and software models. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC506 - Design and Analysis of Algorithms
Course Description
This graduate course provides students with a foundational knowledge in the design and analysis of algorithms. Students will make use of appropriate data structures. Complexity and analysis of algorithms will be completed focusing on worst case and average case, lower bounds, NP-completeness, and recurrences. Students will explore the complexity of appropriate searching, sorting, and graphing algorithms. Prerequisite: CSC505 Principles of Software Development 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC507 - Foundations of Operating Systems
Course Description
This graduate course provides students with a foundational knowledge in operating system concepts. Students will gain a detailed understanding of appropriate operating system constructs that involve OS abstractions and mechanisms. Students will also understand the constructs of multithreading and resource management in compute systems. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC510 - Foundations of Artificial Intelligence
Course Description
This graduate course provides students with an understanding of principles associated with Artificial Intelligence (AI). Students will determine how to utilize structures to represent graphs associated in data exploration. Students will gain an understanding of how to efficiently apply knowledge representation and techniques associated with AI reasoning. Topics that students will explore include techniques efficiently applying game theory, integer programming, continuous optimization, and probability analysis. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC515 - Foundations of Computer Vision
Course Description
This Graduate course provide students with foundational knowledge in the areas digital image construction and processing. Students will explore topics associated with image formation, image acquisition, and image geometry. The course will expose students to the techniques required to efficiently analyze images for representation in applicable context scenarios. Students will apply image processing techniques for filtering and edge detection for image deconstruction. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC525 - Principles of Machine Learning
Course Description
This Graduate course provides students with an understanding of foundations concepts and theories in machine learning. Students will explore foundational topics that include: supervised and unsupervised learning, learning theory, reinforcement learning and adaptive control. Students will gain an understanding of applications of machine learning in areas of data mining, human computer interaction, natural language processing and computer vision. Prerequisite: CSC510 Artificial Intelligence 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CSC580 - Capstone: Applying Machine Learning and Neural Networks
Course Description
This Graduate course provides students with an overview of appropriate theories and models that are used to represent neural networks. Students will gain foundational knowledge in developing constructs to evaluate and represent components associated with neural networks and learning algorithms. Topics for this course include propagation, feedforward networks, perceptrons, and self-organizing networks. Prerequisite: CSC510. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Construction Management

 

CMG300 - Fundamentals of Construction Management
Course Description
This course teaches the fundamental skills that construction management students need to ensure they can successfully manage construction projects. This course is intended to introduce students to the basic components of construction management and provide the essential tools and skills needed to implement construction projects from the pre-construction and design phases to the project closure phase. At the completion of this course, students will be able to identify the importance of the construction industry and the main skills construction managers need to possess, including contract management, material and resource management, planning and scheduling, cost estimating and project control. Students will also be introduced to topics such as construction project health, safety, security, and new directions in construction management.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CMG400 - Construction Cost Estimating
Course Description
In this course, students will gain an understanding of the methods and techniques used to perform quantity takeoff and to prepare construction cost estimates. In addition, students will learn how to read plans and specifications and how to use on-screen takeoff tools such as Bluebeam to perform quantity takeoffs. Students will also learn the most important considerations in estimating direct and indirect costs for excavation, concrete, masonry, metals, wood structure, thermal and moisture protection systems, doors, windows, finishes, and MEP work.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CMG450 - Materials Used in Construction
Course Description
This course provides an overview of the main materials used in construction and teaches how materials are employed in construction projects with a focus on the study of types, properties, uses, and methods of assembly of different key materials. Students will explore the different uses of construction materials, such as Portland cement, asphalt, wood, steel, and masonry. Areas of study include investigation, testing, classification, and engineering properties of materials, as well as the modification techniques, according to ASTM standards and government laws and regulations. Material selection from a sustainable construction perspective will also be discussed as part of this course.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CMG465 - Sustainable Development
Course Description
This is an interdisciplinary course that provides students with an understanding of the main concepts of sustainability, sustainable-development principles, and key challenges and solutions to meet sustainable-development goals, including economic, social, and environmental initiatives. Students in this course will gain an in-depth insight into the environmental issues, including climate change, natural resource consumption, and ecosystems issues resulting from industrial development. Students will also learn about the policies, standards, technologies, methodologies, and best practices that offer sustainability solutions to economic and social development problems. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Criminal Justice

 

CRJ300 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Description
In this course, students will be introduced to the study of philosophy and history of criminal justice globally. Topics include an examination of criminal justice agencies such as police and security agencies, courts, and corrections, operating as an interacting system. Students will gain foundational knowledge about criminal justice that will prepare them for future studies in discipline and also explore exciting contemporary topics such as white collar crime, cybercrime and criminology.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ305 - Criminology
Course Description
In this course, students explore crime, its micro and macro social context, and underlying causes. Students will be introduced to various theoretical perspectives explaining crime and, by the end of the course, apply relevant theories to explain crime and criminal behavior. Students will study victimology and learn about victimless crimes. Students will also be acquainted with the primary sources of crime statistics, which are an essential component in studying crime and testing theories.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ310 - Law Enforcement and American Policing
Course Description
In this course, students will learn about the history of American policing, current issues and challenges, best practices, various roles and tasks, as well as legal, ethical, and public accountability. A thorough overview of the American system of law enforcement, examining the origins, development, roles, and operations of policing in a modern democratic society will also be covered. Students will develop a detailed understanding of the issues involved in policing a democratic society and examine critical issues and new advances in law enforcement. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ315 - Corrections
Course Description
In this course, students gain an overview of the establishment and function of jails and prisons and the punishment of criminals. Issues covered include philosophies of punishment and rehabilitation, sentencing, special prison populations, recidivism, and future challenges for the field of corrections. Students learn implications resulting from penology and punishment.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ320 - Juvenile Justice
Course Description
In this course, focus begins with the history of adolescence, delinquency, and the U.S. juvenile justice system. Students examine theories on the causes of delinquency and study police, courts, corrections, and rule of law as applied to youth in order to recognize the problems and issues associated with measuring juvenile crime and victimization. In addition, the students will explore contemporary themes such as school violence, drugs, and bullying.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ325 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology
Course Description
In this course, students examine major areas of interest shared by psychology and law, including the use of psychological assessments in court, issues of criminal responsibility, criminal profiling, and the use of psychological knowledge in prisons. Students apply knowledge of human behavior and through processes to a variety of legal contexts covered in this course.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ330 - Research Methods for the Criminal Justice Professional
Course Description
In this course, students are introduced to statistical techniques most commonly encountered in the analysis of quantitative data in social and criminal justice fields. Emphasis is placed on descriptive and inferential statistics. The learning experience culminates a comprehensive report of hypothesis testing with secondary data.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ335 - Laws of Evidence
Course Description
In this course, students draw upon a mix of problems and cases to examine major evidentiary rules and standards that regulate admission of proof at criminal trial. Concepts include relevance; the use of character and scientific evidence; the definition and use of hearsay; the use of real and demonstrative evidence; the proper method of impeaching witnesses, foundation and authentication requirements; and the law of privileges.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ336 - Criminal Investigation
Course Description
In this course, students examine the theory and practice of modern investigation methods for law enforcement and private sector agencies. Topics include techniques and procedure for evidence collection, preservation, and presentation, as well as investigation resources, including crime laboratory and databases. Students explore current investigative techniques and tools applied in criminal investigations and also address exciting trending topics such as cybercrime, profiling, and white collar crime.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ340 - Restorative and Community Based Justice
Course Description
In this course, students are introduced to the origins, theories, controversies, and practices, both past and present, of restorative and transformative justice as alternative responses to resolve conflicts. Course material also interrogates the question: “when is it appropriate to forgive rather than to punish?” and examines how restorative justice is employed and practiced to address crime, school discipline, and other types of conflict around the world.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ420 - Criminal Justice and the Constitution
Course Description
In this course, students explore the theory and practice of modern criminal investigation techniques. Topics include tactics and procedures for crime scene evidence collection, preservation, and presentation. Students learn investigative approaches in specific forms of crime and develop a working knowledge of the steps of investigation, beginning with the initial crime scene, and ending with evidence.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ425 - Criminal Law
Course Description
In this course, students will focus on all aspects to the fundamentals of criminal law. Major topics covered in the course include: elements of various types of crimes; requisite mental states for crimes; the nature and purpose of criminal responsibility; criminal defenses, including justification and excuse; and theories of criminal responsibility. This course also examines specific criminal cases to illustrate and apply many of the legal principles covered.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ426 - Investigative and Forensic Interviewing
Course Description
In this course, students explore the importance of conducting investigative interview and interrogations as the foundation for all levels of law enforcement and private investigative case work, intelligence development, and assessment and planning. The major course components include structure of the interview, cognitive interviewing, detection of deception, and elements of interrogation.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ431 - Victimology
Course Description
In this course, students examine the definitions, theories, and causes of victimization. Topics also include the criminal and civil processes available to protect and restore victims of crime. The social, personal, and economic impacts of crime on individuals, organizations, and society are also examined. This course is a replacement course for PBS431 as of the 17-18 Spring Trimester. Students cannot receive credit for both of these courses.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ440 - Ethics for the Criminal Justice Professional
Course Description
In this course, students explore the theory, practice, and application of ethics to the field of criminal justice. The course will focus on understanding how ethics works with the practice of criminal justice. This course prepares students for further inquiry into ethics by providing a solid foundation of its role in criminal justice policy and practice.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ450 - Investigative Forensic Photography
Course Description
In this course, students learn the art of reproducing crime, accident, or autopsy scenes using photography to aid in investigation or for the benefit of a court. Students examine the principles, theory, techniques and ethics of photography in digital format as applied in criminal investigation and within the field of forensics. Discussions are focused on the use of photographs in court and the testimony of the photography. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ460 - Managing Criminal Justice Organizations
Course Description
In this course, students explore the history of adolescence, delinquency, and the U.S. juvenile justice system. Students examine theories on the causes of delinquency and study police, courts, corrections, and rule of law as applied to youth in order to recognize the problems and issues associated with measuring juvenile crime and victimization. In addition, the students will explore contemporary themes such as school violence, drugs and bullying.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ465 - Crime Scene Investigation (CSI)
Course Description
In this course, students focus on the application of scientific methods for the examination of physical evidence in the criminal justice system including microscopy, ballistics, pattern recognition, and fingerprint analysis. Students apply critical-thinking skills to analyze evidence using scientific processes and procedures.
Credit Hours: 4

 

CRJ470 - Race, Class, and Crime
Course Description
This class is an examination of the impact of race, social class, and crime on the justice system, the occurrence of crime, and punishment. The course interrogates the question: “Does skin color influence justice in America?” Students learn race and class as social constructs and explore them in relationship to crime rates, and their impact on society and communities through law enforcement practice, incarceration, sentencing policies, as well as the economic and political systems. This course will examine the role of implicit bias in the criminal justice system.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ480 - Capstone: Application of Criminal Justice Knowledge and Skills
Course Description
This course focuses on a criminal justice issue in-depth at the national and international levels. Prerequisite: All core and specialization courses.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ495 - Criminal Justice Practicum
Course Description
This course is designed for students who currently participate on the staff of a criminal justice or related service agency as an opportunity to demonstrate program outcomes learned in the B.S. in Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement Administration under the supervision of both faculty and agency personnel. Assignments are designed to combine theory and professional practice and include weekly journals, a mid-term conference with the faculty practicum coordinator and on-site supervisor as well as a final report. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete three courses (nine credits) prior to taking the practicum. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ500 - Criminological Theory
Course Description
In this course, students will gain an understanding of the major schools of thought about crime causation (sociological, psychological, and biological) and identify the primary positions of each theoretical approach. In addition students will examine the role of theories in reasoning and organizing studies of crime and control, and discerns policy implications of various theories. In completing the course, students will gain/improve their library research skills and acquaint themselves with APA style and citing sources.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ530 - Ethics, Justice and Social Control
Course Description
In this course, students explore the study of theory, practice, and applications of ethics in criminal justice. Students engage in a philosophical undertaking that seeks to understand and justify moral standards and policies and practices that are presently applied to the occupations that comprise the criminal justice system. The course fosters the students understanding of economics, ethics, law, and power towards constructs of morality.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ540 - Criminal Justice Policy Development and Analysis
Course Description
This course explores the process of policy making in the justice system, including an examination of the ways policy decisions impact criminal justice organizations. Students will learn the fundamentals of the policy process, including agenda setting, implementation, and evaluation. Students will also explore the impact of media and other external forces on setting the policy agenda at the local, state, and federal levels. This course will prepare the student for further inquiry into policy making and the policy process, providing a solid foundation for students to understand the role of policy in justice system practices.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ545 - Restorative Justice: A Social Movement
Course Description
In this course, students will explore restorative justice, which has emerged on the international scene as an umbrella concept and social movement. Topics include empirical evidence for restorative justice, critical issues and gaps in theory and practice, and the integrity and overall direction of the movement. Students will explore the needs and roles of key stakeholders (victim, offenders, communities, and justice systems), the values and assumptions of the movement (including its spiritual and religious roots), and current practices in the United States and beyond.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ550 - Administration and Management of Criminal Justice Organizations
Course Description
In this course, students will learn about the theories of organizational behavior and the management of justice organizations. Students will examine challenges facing criminal justice leaders who manage resources and employees who are responsible for public safety. Class discussions will expand students' understanding of what differentiates criminal justice organizations from private and other, public, organizations.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ555 - Fraud Examination and Prevention
Course Description
In this course, students examine the act of fraud, motivations for committing fraud, ways to combat fraud, methods of fraud prevention, symptoms of fraud, legal resolution of fraud, and methods of fraud detection. Students focus on fraud investigation and the types of evidence necessary for fraud actions and learn the requirements of a fraud report. This course also identifies the various types of fraud including fraud against organizations, fraud on behalf of organizations, and assessment of fraud risk in e-commerce.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ556 - Criminal Justice and Legal Concepts of Fraud
Course Description
In this course, students develop an overview of the legal systems involved in dealing with fraud and the processes and procedures of fraud investigation, prosecution, and legal remedies required for fraud management professionals. The course includes overviews of types of fraud and of the U.S. court system, and further explores fraud as a civil cause of action and as a crime. In discussion, fraud as a crime, emphasis is placed on criminal procedure and the rights of the defendant. Students are also introduced to concepts related to evidence and the role of the expert witness in a fraud case.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ557 - Fraud Investigation
Course Description
In this course we will review types of fraud, documents associated with criminal investigation of fraud, sources of evidence, and analysis of internal and external fraud schemes. Emphasis on the skills needed to identify and investigate fraud will be reviewed. The typology and investigative processes associated with an array of white-collar crimes will be analyzed. Review of the process of serving search warrants, civic injunctions, and forfeiture will be addressed. A full range of investigative tools and techniques involved in investigating white-collar criminal cases will be examined. Examples of important documents such as search warrants, seizure warrants, and civil injunction declarations will be given.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ558 - Fraud Data Analysis
Course Description
This course focuses on computer-assisted analytical techniques for fraud detection and investigation. Students will learn about solutions to data problems and applications of analytical techniques for preventative, detective, and corrective controls. Students will gain an understanding of advanced fraud analytics, such as using Benfords Law, and also explore analyzing written statements, bank records, and exploring investment swindles and con schemes.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ570 - Applied Research for Criminal Justice Professionals
Course Description
In this course, students will develop a practical understanding of the most common research tools and techniques used by public and private sector criminal justice organizations. Students are able to contextualize criminal behavior while developing skills using tools for resource allocation within criminal justice agencies. The course also explores both traditional and more contemporary approaches to research.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ575 - Analytical Methods
Course Description
In this course, students will gain a strong foundation for applying analytical skills and reasoning in the criminal justice environment. Students will gain a working knowledge of conducting, critically evaluating, and reporting statistical analyses for studies in criminology and the criminal justice fields. The emphasis will be on hypothesis testing with bivariate statistical methods and the linear regression model.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ580 - Criminal Justice Capstone Experience
Course Description
In this course, students will understand and integrate research and components of crime and justice administration/management as learned throughout the Master of Criminal Justice program. Students evaluate a social intervention or justice policy by reviewing research evidence and making proper recommendations. The course centers on the completion of an evidence-based capstone work that will serve as the essential foundation of a professional portfolio. Students will utilize all learned skills, theories, techniques, and knowledge learned through their academic program and apply them within many areas of this course. Prerequisite: All core and specialization courses.
Credit Hours: 3

 

CRJ595 - Criminal Justice Internship
Course Description
In this course, students participate on the staff of a criminal justice or related service agency under the co-supervision of faculty and agency personnel. Weekly journals and a mid-term report are required and combine theory and observation of professional practice. Other course requirements include a mid-term conference with the faculty internship coordinator and evaluation of the on-site supervisor. On-site hours are determined by credit hours. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete three courses (nine credits) prior to taking the internship. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Digital Health Technology

 

DHT506 - Technology and Health Informatics
Course Description
In this course, students are provided with an extensive overview of healthcare informatics. Course emphasis is on the integration of medical technology and information science in professional practice. Practice knowledge of healthcare informatics will serve as the foundation on which to build new information regarding technology systems, evidence-based practice, education, and communication in healthcare settings.
Credit Hours: 3

 

DHT510 - Emerging Technologies and the Future of Health Innovation
Course Description
In this course, students examine the capabilities of Telehealth and how technology can expand access to healthcare for underserved populations. Topics include Artificial Intelligence (AI), Robotics, Cloud computing, Data Analysis, Health Information (HI) systems and design, Applied Informatics, Block Chain, Data Security, Project Management, electronic/mobile Health and others. Additional topics include mobile technologies, wearables, and patient centered health care.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Economics

 

ECN210 - Microeconomic Principles
Course Description
Microeconomics addresses the economic decisions made at the individual level, by individual consumers or individual firms, after evaluating resources, costs, and tradeoffs. Topics include microeconomic concepts and analysis; supply and demand analysis; theories of the firm and individual behavior; competition and monopoly; environmental externalities and the public good; and, the role of the government in the domestic and global economy. This course is required for business-related degrees such as BSBM. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course (GT-SS1) for Colorado and surrounding states
Credit Hours: 3

 

ECN210 - Microeconomic Principles
Course Description
Microeconomics addresses the economic decisions made at the individual level, by individual consumers or individual firms, after evaluating resources, costs, and tradeoffs. Topics include microeconomic concepts and analysis; supply and demand analysis; theories of the firm and individual behavior; competition and monopoly; environmental externalities and the public good; and, the role of the government in the domestic and global economy. This course is required for business-related degrees such as BSBM. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course (GT-SS1) for Colorado and surrounding states
Credit Hours: 3

 

ECN215 - Macroeconomic Principles
Course Description
This course provides a general overview of economic and macroeconomic principles that impact the way we live. This course will introduce students to the quantitative and qualitative analysis and business evaluation skills needed to critically evaluate macroeconomic data and policies. Students will also gain exposure to the variables and outcomes of decisions made by policymakers while enhancing their own decision-making skills. This course required for business-related degrees such as BSBM. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course (GT-SS1) for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ECN310 - Microeconomic Principles
Course Description
Microeconomics addresses the economic decisions made at the individual level, by individual consumers or individual firms, after evaluating resources, costs, and trade-offs. Topics include microeconomic concepts and analysis; supply and demand analysis; theories of the firm and individual behavior; competition and monopoly; environmental externalities and the public good; and, the role of the government in the domestic and global economy. This course is considered prerequisite and may be waived through transfer of equivalent lower-division coursework or demonstrated workplace knowledge. BSBM majors enrolled prior to Winter A 2018 will take ECN310 and ECN315. BSBM majors enrolled after Winter A 2018 will take the prerequisites of ECN210 and ECN215.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ECN315 - Macroeconomic Principles
Course Description
This course provides a general overview of economic and macroeconomic principles that impact the way we live. This course will introduce students to the quantitative and qualitative analysis and business evaluation skills needed to critically evaluate macroeconomic data and policies. Students will also gain exposure to the variables and outcomes of decisions made by policymakers while enhancing their own decision-making skills. BSBM majors enrolled prior to Winter A 2018 will take ECN310 and ECN315.  
Credit Hours: 3

 

ECN410 - Comparative Economics and Global Business 1800 Present
Course Description
This course looks at the economies of five different regions/cultures around the world: Europe, Asia, Islam, Africa, and Latin America. Special attention will be given to the history, culture, and systems of each geographical and sociopolitical area. This course is no longer available. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ECN500 - Global Economics
Course Description
This course applies and examines classical economic knowledge of international trade and finance to inform decision making in the areas of business, management, and policy. Topics such as classical trade theory, barriers to trade, regulatory policies, gross domestic product, and international banking are explored.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Education Leadership

 

EDL500 - Strategic Leadership
Course Description
This course examines how data analysis and the application of evidenced-based goals and actions influence school culture, student achievement, and staff performance. Students examine school data to identify gaps in student achievement, collaborate with stakeholders to develop a strategic plan, identify evidence-based strategies to improve student and staff performance, and utilize distributive leadership principles to support collaboration and engagement among staff members. Through an embedded internship, this course provides future school leaders with practical experiences to gain the skills necessary to effectively design, develop, and implement school improvement plans and create an inclusive school culture that meets the needs of a diverse student population. Prerequisite: All admission criteria for the Principal Licensure Concentration must be met prior to enrollment.
Credit Hours: 3

 

EDL510 - School Leadership Internship
Course Description
This course fulfills the internship requirement of the Education Leadership: Principal Licensure Concentration program at CSU Global. Prior to enrolling in this course, students should have completed the required 300 total hours (approximately 6 hours per week) of internship activities that specifically align to the Colorado Principal Quality and English Learner Standards. In this course, learners complete assignments focused on their clinical experiences and document proficiency of both the State standards and program Leadership Dispositions. This course may be completed at the same time as OTL568 which therefore allows students to complete six graduate credits in one term without completing a course overload request. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite: EDL560  Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3

 

EDL520 - Instructional Leadership
Course Description
This course examines instructional leadership in K-12 schools with special attention to promoting the success of every student through data-driven decision-making and evidence-based instructional practices. Students will focus on strategies and methods to build collaborative cultures of inquiry, establish teacher evaluation and feedback skills, develop master school schedules, and create needs-based professional learning opportunities.
Credit Hours: 3

 

EDL530 - School Culture and Equity Leadership
Course Description
This course introduces theory, evidence-based methods and research-based practices that promote an inclusive and welcoming school climate to encourage the holistic development of every learner. Students will explore the impact of equity in school cultures, analyze equitable frameworks, and identify research-based strategies to foster cultural competency within the school community.
Credit Hours: 3

 

EDL540 - Human Resource Leadership
Course Description
This course provides an overview of the human resource functions of a school leader and introduces strategies to create inclusive, effective learning environments. Students investigate models of teacher evaluation, analyze data and design professional development experiences utilizing research-based practices and accountability plans to address learner achievement gaps.
Credit Hours: 3

 

EDL550 - Managerial Leadership
Course Description
This course provides an overview of the managerial functions of a school leader and presents research-based strategies for ensuring the effective use of school resources including the integration of technology and utilization of data to drive decision-making. Students analyze the impact of policy and legislation on school planning and evaluate school planning documents for compliance. To promote a safe school culture students examine research-based strategies for conflict resolution and identify areas for improvement in their own schools or internship placement. with federal/state laws and school board policies. Prerequisite: EDL540
Credit Hours: 3

 

EDL560 - External Development Leadership
Course Description
This course presents research-based strategies to increase stakeholder engagement within the school community and with external partners. Students will identify and integrate external resources into the school community to support learning goals, develop plans to improve communication among stakeholders, and create policy and guidelines for using electronic communication tools. Students will evaluate existing guidebooks and written communications and make revisions to better meet the needs of all community members.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Emergency Management

 

EMG300 - Foundations of Emergency Management
Course Description
In this course, the student will explore the global view of emergency management. Students will study the disciplines of emergency management and communication within the context of historical events through examination of case studies of natural and man-made disasters. It introduces students to concepts and challenges of crises operations. Additionally, topics include exploration of the connections between national-level policy and state-level programs that emphasize the development of integrated plans. Finally, the course combines lessons learned from historical events with emergency management concepts to improve preparedness and minimize the effects of future hazards and threats.
Credit Hours: 3

 

EMG325 - Hazard Mitigation
Course Description
In this course, students focus on mitigation, or actions taken that reduce or eliminate hazard risks to citizens and property. It also addresses how this is an ongoing phase in which communities continually pursue mitigation efforts through thoughtful planning and effective leadership. Additionally, methods will be presented on how emergency management personnel can attempt to influence human behavior during a crisis. Finally, mitigation activities such as planning, strategizing, and implementation of action items will be explored. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

EMG375 - Disaster Response
Course Description
In this course, students explore disaster response as an action taken immediately before, during, or directly after an emergency occurs, to save lives and minimize damage to property. Topics include disaster, response activities, warning people of severe weather, evacuating those considered to be at risk, and sheltering the affected population. It also explores providing emergency medical care, relaying information to the public, and managing the arrival of donations and volunteers. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

EMG400 - Disaster Recovery
Course Description
In this class, students will examine disaster recovery as the last phase of the ongoing emergency management cycle of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. It focuses on the complex process that involves the whole community of public, private, and non-governmental organizations to restore the community back to normal. The recovery process can take months and sometimes years to complete. Students also learn about community leaders and identify the stakeholders and the components of the recovery process, the community develops a recovery plan that describes the short-term and long-term goals to achieve restoration and healing after the disaster. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

EMG450 - Comprehensive Emergency Planning
Course Description
Emergency planning at the local, state, and federal levels of government has evolved since 1900. Since that time, the population and disasters have increased that caused some social populations to experience more suffering than others. The outcry from the multitude of disaster affected populations directed the public’s attention to the focusing event. Emergency management at all levels of government evaluated the risks, policies, emergency plans to improve planning and response efforts, and provide sufficient resources. Local communities evaluated their risks, the vulnerable populations, and resources to improve their emergency plans. Natural and man-made disasters have greatly diversified and increased in magnitude that require continual evaluation of policies and emergency plans.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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English

 

ENG101 - Composition I
Course Description
In English 101, learners will engage a variety of critical reading, thinking, and writing skills as they plan, write, revise, and edit academic compositions. Learners will practice fundamental academic writing and critical thinking skills including researching and evaluating resources, assessing the reader, critically analyzing texts, supporting interpretations, and applying APA formatting requirements as they compile a portfolio of revised and edited drafts for the final project. To complete these drafts, learners will be required to engage CSU Global resources, including the library and Writing Center. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Written Communication requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course (GT-CO1) for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ENG102 - Composition II
Course Description
Composition II emphasizes critical/logical thinking and reading, problem solving, research strategies, and writing argumentative papers in an analytical manner that incorporates research from credible sources and addresses multiple stakeholder positions. APA writing style and format as taught at CSU Global is applied throughout all written assignments. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Written Communication requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course (GT-CO2) for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ENG130 - Introduction to Literature
Course Description
This course is intended to provide learners with an introductory study of traditional and postmodern literary works. Learners will read, evaluate and analyze literature from the three major genres: prose, poetry, and drama. Learners in this class will develop competencies in order to examine literary elements such as symbolism, theme, plot, character, and setting. Class activities will work to further a learner’s appreciation and comprehension of various literary works. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Arts and Humanities requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course (GT-AH2) for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ENG501 - Studies in Composition Studies and Pedagogy
Course Description
This course establishes the academic foundation for graduate English studies at CSU Global. Students will learn the process for developing academic approaches to teaching composition in high school and college based on the current pedagogies within the composition and rhetoric academic community. Besides learning the basic foundations of academic inquiry, students will learn the critical differences between current composition theories and pedagogies in the context of how this discipline has evolved since the late 1960s and early 1970s. Based on the theories they learned in this class, students will concentrate on developing practical solutions to often confounding problems of teaching students how to write in the digital age. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ENG510 - Literary Criticism and Theory
Course Description
In this course students will learn how to use the various theoretical lenses to develop coherent criticism of a literary text. An emphasis in this course will be not only to teach selected theoretical perspectives, but for students to write literary criticism based on the appropriate methodology that specifically pertains to that theory. The various theoretical lenses will include New Criticism, New Historicism, Structuralism, Deconstructionism, African American, Feminism, Marxism, Reader Response, Psychoanalytical, Gay and Lesbian, Ecocriticism, and Postcolonial. Prerequisite: ENG501. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ENG515 - History and Theory of Rhetoric
Course Description
In this course students will learn the process for developing approaches to teaching the history and theory of rhetoric in high school and college based on traditional theories within the English literary community. Students will learn the historical development of rhetoric from origins in ancient Greece to the digital age of the 21st century. Students will study Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero from the classical period, the further development of rhetoric during the medieval period, especially as was influenced by Cicero, the emergence of humanism and Aristotelean scholasticism in the Renaissance, the enlightenment of the 17th and 18th centuries that was influenced by John Locke and empiricism, the development of modern rhetoric in the 20th century to include influential thinkers such as Kenneth Burke, I.A. Richards, and Marshall McLuhan. Prerequisite: ENG501, ENG510. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ENG520 - Advanced Studies in World Literature
Course Description
In this course students will study the different literary genres and styles from a range of global or world literature perspectives, including reading the traditional masterpieces, such as Homer's The Odyssey; and a post-colonial reading, such as in Achebe's Things Fall Apart. Students will develop various approaches of reading, especially in how different cultures develop literature that is both unique to primary English-language readers while, at the same time, literature that is compellingly similar. This course will try to bridge cultural differences while at the same time we will emphasize our similarities. Prerequisite: ENG501, ENG515. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ENG525 - British Romantic Literature
Course Description
In this course students will study British Romanticism as a major intellectual, literary, and cultural movement, reading the works of the major writers of that period. Although the publication of Lyrical Ballads in 1789 traditionally marks the beginning of the English Romantic period, several English writers had already been demonstrating impulses that would be then be more formalized by writers like Wordsworth and Coleridge. The course themes will include: the Romantic ideas about nature, revolution and democratic government, the dominance of feelings and emotion over reason and logic, the importance of the common man, how art and literature should reflect the natural world, and how traditional literary forms were stretched and transformed into new modes of expression during the British Romantic period. Prerequisite: ENG501, ENG520. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ENG532 - American Literature WWI to Present
Course Description
This course will cover the two major literary movements that occur during this period: Modernism and Post-Modernism. Students will discuss how the various writers who lived and wrote during these two periods both represent and contradict the definitions of these major literary movements. In a literary period where contradiction is a major thematic and stylistic approach, few writers in the modern America will ever fit into a neat package. Also discussed in this class is the emergence of diverse voices on the American literary scene. As the 20th century drew to a close and the beginning of a new century has developed: minority and previously marginalized writers have emerged as the dominant voices of the new American literature. Prerequisite: ENG501, ENG525. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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English Language Learning

 

ELL500 - English Language Learners
Course Description
Methods and techniques of teaching English to children of linguistically diverse backgrounds.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ELL505 - Language Acquisition and Linguistics
Course Description
Normal processes of development of language in children, growth of language, including structure, comprehension, use of oral and written language, other symbolic behavior.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ELL520 - Literacy and the English Language Learner
Course Description
Methods and techniques of teaching Literacy to K-12 English Language Learners.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ELL530 - Assessment and Administration of ELL Programs
Course Description
Study of state, federal, and local laws and policies concerning ELL programs; language proficiency instruments used by teachers for assessment and placement of ELLs.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Finance

 

FIN300 - Principles of Finance for the Private Sector
Course Description
A study of the financial aspects of businesses, including the costs of capital, fund acquisition sources, time value of money, efficient management of assets, and investment decisions. Particular emphasis is on determining the optimal capital structure between utilization of debt and equity financing.  
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN310 - Financial Analytics and Modeling
Course Description
In this course, students apply the methodologies, techniques, and tools most commonly used in the analysis of financial data and creation of financial models. Drawing on methods of research from the fields of statistics, operations research, and information systems, students will use industry tools for visualization, inference, forecasting, and business optimization. The emphasis is on exposing the student to the techniques and software tools that are used in the industry to make informed financial decisions. Prerequisite: MTH410
Prerequisite: MTH410 Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN320 - Introduction to Insurance and Investment Planning
Course Description
Students are provided with the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of private and public insurance products, insurance planning, investment vehicles, and different approaches to investment. Students will examine the different types of insurance available to individuals and develop a learn how to evaluate portfolio performance.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN321 - Retirement and Real Estate Planning
Course Description
Students will examine the major components of retirement and real estate planning as it relates to personal finance. The course is designed to prepare students in personal and employee-sponsored retirement plans, gathering information, and selecting appropriate options to achieve a client’s retirement goals. Additionally, students will evaluate property ownership issues, taxation issues, planning documents, and implementation strategies that encompass effective estate planning.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN322 - Personal Income Tax Planning
Course Description
This course is designed to prepare students with an understanding of personal and business income taxation and develop the skills necessary to provide advice and recommendations for effective tax planning. Students will examine tax returns and discuss tax implications for individuals and businesses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN323 - Developing the Financial Plan
Course Description
Students are provided an overview of the basics of financial and investment planning. Students will also examine the role and functions of the financial planner. The course is designed to prepare students with a fundamental understanding of financial planning tools and techniques including: (1) financial statement analysis, (2) basic economics, (3) funding for education, and (4) working and communicating with others.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN330 - Corporate Finance
Course Description
This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth analysis of corporate financial operations, tools, and technologies. Specific topic areas may include sources of corporate funding, the capital structure of corporations, operational and financial projection modeling, budgeting, and the actions financial leaders take to increase the value of the firm. Additionally, students will apply the tools and analysis used to allocate financial resources.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN332 - Risk Management and Analysis
Course Description
In this course students will learn about the role of financial risk management in organization and prepare an organization for uncertainties. Special attention will be paid to the differences between financial and business risks and the examination risk management concepts and techniques. Students will review the role of risk regulation in financial markets and learn how to identify and describe the various types of financial risk and their sources. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN333 - Corporate Valuation
Course Description
In this course, students are prepared with the skills needed to perform detailed business valuation modeling using three main methods: Comps, Precedents and DCF Analysis. Students will learn a detailed for valuing a company based on comparable companies, past M&A transactions and a Discounted Cash Flow Model (DCF). 
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN350 - Principles of Finance for the Public Sector
Course Description
Introduction to financing of and budgeting within public sector institutions, including the history and trends of funds acquisition and distribution. Accountability to governing bodies and taxpayers for the use of public fiscal resources will be examined.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN375 - Working Capital Management
Course Description
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the financial requirements for continued organizational operation. Students will assess the requirements for an organization to maintain its ability to satisfy both maturing short-term debt and upcoming operational expenses. Students will understand how to manage inventories, accounts receivable and payable, and cash.
Prerequisite: ACT301 Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN375 - Working Capital Management
Course Description
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the financial requirements for continued organizational operation. Students will assess the requirements for an organization to maintain its ability to satisfy both maturing short-term debt and upcoming operational expenses. Students will understand how to manage inventories, accounts receivable and payable, and cash.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN400 - Analyzing Financial Statements
Course Description
This course introduces the study of accounting principles to give students an understanding of the theory and logic that underlie basic accounting procedures and practices. It then focuses on reading, interpreting, and analyzing financial statements. Major topics include the underlying framework of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and comparison with the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), the accounting cycle, preparation of the four principal financial statements, and financial statements analysis as well as ratio analysis for strategic planning and decision making. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN440 - Financial Strategy and Forecasting
Course Description
This course is designed to provide students with the business acumen needed to determine budget goals, use financial tools to create forecasts, and analyze factors contributing to budget and forecast variances. Using a case study approach, students will analyze and present financial variances and translate financial data to inform operational decision making.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN480 - Capstone: Finance
Course Description
In this final course in the program, students will have the opportunity to apply finance program learning outcomes by analyzing the financial operations of organizations or businesses. Students will select, based on their specific area of study, a project to demonstrate their understanding of basic and advanced financial principles, theories, and practices. Prerequisite: Completion of major area of study.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN481 - Capstone: Personal Finance
Course Description
In this final course in the personal finance specialization and BS Finance program, students will demonstrate their technical financial planning knowledge and ability to integrate, apply and communicate this knowledge. They will demonstrate their ability to apply the financial planning process to real-life situations, as well as their ability to communicate their planning recommendations to a client.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN500 - Principles of Finance
Course Description
Understand the principles and theories of finance to analyze statements and fiscal information for effective decision making in today's competitive environment.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN507 - Bank Management
Course Description
This course examines the changing environment of commercial banks and banking services. Topics include the unique management challenges associated with regulatory changes, product innovations, financial reporting, and risk management. Recommended Prior Course: FIN500
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN510 - Financial Economics
Course Description
This course is an introduction to financial economics. It will cover the analytical tools and finance theory necessary to make good investment decisions and to understand the paradigm of security valuation. Important themes in the course include individual decision making, risk and return, arbitrage, and market equilibrium.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN520 - Financial Reporting and Analysis
Course Description
The course studies the process of business analysis and valuation through the evaluation of financial statements. Topics include analysis of financial statements and ratio, strategic, prospective, equity and credit analysis. Recommended Prior Course: FIN500
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN530 - Corporate Finance
Course Description
This course builds on concepts covered in FIN 500 and provides a comprehensive array of skills to manage the finance function of a modern organization. It provides the necessary background both to understand and to apply financial-management techniques in order to be successful in positions of business management. Topics include capital structure and dividend theory, valuation models, portfolio theory, advanced cash flow analysis , and weighted and marginal cost of capital within a capital rationing model. Recommended Prior Course: FIN500
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN540 - Investments
Course Description
The course provides a broad and detailed overview of the investment portfolio segment within the financial planning process. Students in the course will learn the basics of investments and explore theories and methods as they relate to the individual client. Topics covered include efficient market hypothesis theories, securities valuation concepts, investment portfolio theory, investment strategies, asset allocation and diversification, and portfolio construction. Recommended Prior Course: FIN500.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN550 - Financial Markets and Institutions
Course Description
This course presents an overview of the roles played by the various markets, institutions, and financial authorities. Specific topics include an introduction the U.S. financial system, the supply and demand for loan funds, securities, and obligations. Emphasis is placed upon policy effects of financial institutions and markets upon various sectors of the economy. Recommended Prior Course: FIN540
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN560 - Derivatives and Asset Pricing
Course Description
This course provides a broad and detailed coverage of the derivatives markets including forwards, futures, swaps, and options. The role that derivative securities play in managing risk for multinational corporations, portfolio managers, and institutional investors is emphasized. Derivatives as speculative and hedging strategies are covered in detail.
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN570 - Insurance and Risk Management
Course Description
This course provides an understanding of how large-scale complex risk can be quantified, managed, and architected. Students learn to identify the business and technical issues, regulatory requirements and techniques to measure and report risk across a major organization. Recommended Prior Course: FIN500
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN575 - International Financial Management
Course Description
This course provides a comprehensive introduction and overview of the field of international finance. It covers the knowledge needed to manage the international aspects of multinational firms, the operations of international and foreign bank and financial institutions, and the operations of all firms, organizations, and individuals active in the current and future global business and financial environments. Recommended Prior Course: FIN500
Credit Hours: 3

 

FIN580 - Capstone: Finance
Course Description
The goal of this capstone course is to integrate all essential concepts in financial decision-making. Students will develop a comprehensive capstone project that can be applied to a place of employment or within the financial sector. Recommended Prior Courses: All required program courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Geology

 

GEO101C - Earth Science with Lab
Course Description
Students in this course examine the study of four Earth Science regions: the lithosphere (rock), the hydrosphere (water), the atmosphere (air), and outer space. The course begins with a look at scientific processes on land, then builds further by examining our oceans, weather and climate. The course concludes by looking at our planet’s place in our solar system and the cosmos. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education [Natural & Physical Sciences] lecture with lab requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course [GT-SC1 & GT-SC2] for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 4

 

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Global Environmental Sustainability

 

GES120 - Water Sustainability in the Western U.S.
Course Description
This course provides a multi-disciplinary overview of the issues surrounding the biggest challenges to the sustainability of life in the West, with special attention on the impacts of important human and natural influences on the use and sustainability of western United States water supplies. Students learn about the issues involved in meeting the needs for water by people, agriculture, and wildlife, how infrastructure allows water to be moved and used, and the processes used to govern water allocation. This course fulfills a CSUG Natural and Physical Sciences requirement.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Health Professional

 

HPR108 - Dietary Nutrition
Course Description
In this course, students will study the basic nutritional principles in clinical practice in health care. Students will study the factors which influence the nutritional status of individuals, methods of nutritional assessment and support, and diet modification for specific disease states. Students will prepare a dietary analysis as part of this course. This course is a General Education Natural and Physical Science elective. This course fulfills the dietary nutrition for nursing requirement.
Credit Hours: 1

 

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Health Science

 

HSC300 - Fundamentals of the U.S. Healthcare System
Course Description
Students are introduced to the U.S. healthcare system. The historical background including reform, shift in hospital and ambulatory care, public health’s influence, and evolving roles of stakeholders are discussed. Impact of health information technology, privacy, and legal/ethical issues are assessed. For profit versus not-for-profit entities are examined and the US healthcare system is contrasted to several other developed nation’s health systems. The influence of quality and safety initiatives, competition within the healthcare industry, and impact on patient care are evaluated. Disclaimer: Students cannot receive credit for HCM310 and HSC300 as they are considered duplicative.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSC310 - Social Impact on Health
Course Description
This course examines comprehensive factors of health that influence the well-being of individuals and communities. The course is designed to help students appreciate the social, economic, and environmental factors that influence health outcomes and how to address them. Students will also examine how culture, race, and ethnicity have a direct impact on the healthcare received through biases and discrimination.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSC320 - Ethics and Law in the Health Sciences
Course Description
This course will offer the student a basic overview regarding healthcare law in the United States and introduce students to the moral and ethical issues that healthcare providers are confronted with daily. It will provide a systemic analysis of healthcare provider services and moral, ethical, and legal issues that may involve healthcare professionals, patients, hospitals, clinics, and other organizations. Students will review legal, moral, and ethical constructs shaping today's healthcare environment, analyze the different types of reasoning in the decision-making process, and utilize various concepts to make identifiable analysis of healthcare challenges and issues. Readings and discussions will include the current standards surrounding the legal and ethical parameters impacting patients and healthcare workers. Disclaimer: Students cannot receive credit for HCM345 and HSC320 as they are considered duplicative.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSC370 - Healthcare Management and Operations
Course Description
In this course, students will be introduced to health science management in various healthcare settings. Students will gain an understanding of how to manage through strategy, planning, and directing with leadership. Workforce performance, quality management, process improvement, financial performance, healthcare analytics, and supply chain management are addressed. Current leadership roles in healthcare require the integration of a high level of patient care based on current standards and an understanding of how older models of management and leadership can be blended with contemporary practice. Disclaimer: Students cannot receive credit for HCM410 and HSC370 as they are considered duplicative.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSC371 - Managed Healthcare and Insurance
Course Description
Managed care and health insurance covers healthcare issues surrounding management, insurance, and changes in payment mechanisms. In this course, students will investigate the history of managed care, and about moral hazard and sale of health benefits coverage, governance, and administration, and provider networks. Topics include fundamentals of cost-containment measures, quality healthcare, and complexities of Medicare Advantage payment plans and Medicaid expansion that occurred under the Affordable Care Act. Disclaimer: Students cannot receive credit for HCM400 and HSC371 as they are considered duplicative.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSC373 - Case Management and Care Coordination
Course Description
This course teaches the principles, practices, and issues in health services case management, with emphasis on prevention and intervention strategies for diverse populations, as well as professional writing and presentation of cases. Topics include interviewing skills, planning, assessment of community resources, referral procedures, coordination of serveices, and setting appropriate professional boundaries. Disclaimer: Students cannot receive credit for HSM405 and HSC373 as they are considered duplicative.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Healthcare Management

 

HCM301 - Accounting and Finance for Healthcare Managers
Course Description
In this course, students will explore finance, beginning with an introduction to basic health care finance concepts. Students will examine financial management and accounting principles in health care organizations. Students will also investigate claims processing, as well as government payer types. Topics will include managed care organizations, Medicare prospective payment systems, revenue cycle management (RCM) and health care fraud and abuse. Finally, students will take a closer look at government incentive programs for their final project. Recommended Prior Course: HCM310
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM310 - Introduction to the U.S. Healthcare System
Course Description
Students are introduced to the U.S. healthcare system. The historical background including reform, shift in hospital and ambulatory care, public health’s influence, and evolving roles of stakeholders are discussed. Impact of health information technology, privacy, and legal/ethical issues are assessed. For profit versus not-for-profit entities are examined and the US healthcare system is contrasted to several other developed nation’s health systems. The influence of quality and safety initiatives, competition within the healthcare industry, and impact on patient care are evaluated. Recommended Prior Course: ORG300. Students cannot receive credit for HCM310 and HSC300 as they are considered duplicative. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM320 - Introduction to Health Policy
Course Description
Students will focus on the historical context of health care delivery and policy-making procedures. Students will focus on the political, economic, and social aspects of health care policy impacting both providers and consumers of services. Further discussion will provide insight into the complexity of healthcare policy formation, how the policy-making process works, and how moral and ethical decision-making at the policy level influence health care providers within various institutional settings. Public health awareness and preparedness will also be discussed as related to influencing political officials to formalize policy-making efforts through legislative reform. Recommended Prior Course: HCM310
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM345 - Health Law and Ethics
Course Description
This course will offer the student a basic overview regarding healthcare law in the United States and introduce students to the moral and ethical issues that healthcare providers are confronted with daily. It will provide a systemic analysis of healthcare provider services and moral, ethical, and legal issues that may involve healthcare professionals, patients, hospitals, clinics, and other organizations. Students will review legal, moral, and ethical constructs shaping today's healthcare environment, analyze the different types of reasoning in the decision-making process, and utilize various concepts to make identifiable analysis of healthcare challenges and issues. Readings and discussions will include the current standards surrounding the legal and ethical parameters impacting patients and healthcare workers. Topics include informed consent, patient confidentiality laws, elder care and abuse, end-of-life-planning, standard of care, and malpractice. Recommended Prior Course: HCM320. Students cannot receive credit for HCM345 and HSC320 as they are considered duplicative.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM370 - Quality and Risk Management in Healthcare
Course Description
In this course the student is provided with an understanding of healthcare quality improvement including methods and tools to increase patient safety, improve healthcare outcomes and reduce risk in the healthcare setting.  It focuses on applying expert knowledge and management expertise to the multiple challenges’ managers face in healthcare organizations. Special emphasis is placed on the role of work teams in quality improvement and risk reduction, including understanding the critical success factors for effective team performance. Additional reading and course discussions include assessing risk in complex healthcare organizations, assessing the value of different management techniques to monitor, anticipate, reduce, and eliminate disruptive and dangerous risks. The fundamental objective of this course is for the student to be able to apply quality and risk management principles in diverse healthcare environments in order to improve patient safety and clinical outcomes. Recommended Prior Course: HCM310 
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM375 - The Economics of Healthcare
Course Description
Students are provided with practical knowledge and application of economic theories and principles for understanding healthcare economic issues related to the amount, organization, and distribution of healthcare resources in the United States. Content provides for comprehension and application of economic principles such as supply and demand, economic theories, resources allocation, competitive markets, market evaluation methods, and cost effectiveness analysis.  Material also examines decision making and the consequences of resource scarcity in the healthcare industry. Students will discuss issues and controversies surrounding the federal and state government’s role in financing and regulating health services. Recommended Prior Course: HCM310 
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM400 - Managed Care and Health Insurance
Course Description
Managed care and health insurance covers healthcare issues surrounding management, insurance, and changes in payment mechanisms. In this course, students will investigate the history of Managed Care; and about moral hazard and sale of health benefits coverage; governance, and administration; and provider networks. Topics include fundamentals of cost-containment measures, quality healthcare, and complexities of Medicare Advantage payment plans and Medicaid expansion that occurred under the Affordable Care Act. Recommended Prior Course: HCM310. Students cannot receive credit for HCM400 and HSC371 as they are considered duplicative.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM410 - Healthcare Operations Management
Course Description
In this course students will be introduced to healthcare management in various healthcare settings. Students will gain understanding of how to manage through strategy, planning, and directing with leadership. Workforce performance, quality management, process improvement, financial performance, healthcare analytics, and supply chain management are addressed. Current leadership roles in healthcare require the integration of a high level of patient care based on current standards and an understanding of how older models of management and leadership can be blended with contemporary practice. Recommended Prior Course: HCM310. Students cannot receive credit for HCM410 and HSC370 as they are considered duplicative.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM430 - Population Health Management
Course Description
Students will be introduced to the multifaceted concepts of population health as it relates to stakeholders in the health system, determinants of health, and sociopolitical factors. Major topics include health care policy and reform, health behavior change, data analytics for population disease management, workplace health, and translation of effective research into practice. Special emphasis will be placed on developing basic skills relevant to community assessment and health promotion strategies. Assignments and discussions provide opportunities to apply epidemiological analysis techniques with an emphasis on assessment of challenges and benefits of population-based interventions. Recommended Prior Course: HCM310
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM450 - Healthcare Information Systems
Course Description
In this course students will examine concepts of knowledge creation, data management and stewardship, use of metrics, and clinical and administrative applications in the provision of health care. The critical nature of aligning health information systems (HIS) with strategy is explored. Methods and processes related to selection and application in use of technology needed to make informed business decisions are discussed as are HIS governance, regulatory compliance, and risk management. Students will gain understanding of the opportunities and challenges of implementing robust and effective information management systems in a healthcare setting. Recommended Prior Course: HCM310
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM460 - Introduction to Healthcare Strategy
Course Description
In this course students will examine aspects of strategy formulation and implementation in health care organizations. A multi-step process is presented for creating and managing a strategic plan and roles of finance, marketing, and human resource departments in the process are discussed. Legal implications and the impact on an organization’s culture are considered. Strategic options such as acquisition and reorganization are explored and tools commonly used for analyzing strategic situations such as Balanced Scorecard, Six Sigma, and SWOT are evaluated. Recommended Prior Courses: HCM310 and HCM410 
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM481 - Capstone: Healthcare Analysis and Policy Development
Course Description
In this course, students will analyze current and future alternatives to U.S. health policy. Economic, political science, management, communications, technology, and public health viewpoints are presented. The political process that influences planning in various health care settings are assessed. Roles, skills, and leadership that healthcare professionals can bring to the policy making process are discussed. Recommended Prior Courses: HCM460, ORG300. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM495 - Healthcare Management Practicum
Course Description
Students will be provided with practical experience in an organization specific to their field. Students will apply outcomes acquired through the BSHAM program core courses. Students will work under the direct supervision of a senior-level professional at an approved organization or company. Each student will be enrolled in an online course and will be required to participate in coursework that will allow them to demonstrate what has been learned through the practicum experience. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite 3 Core Courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM500 - The U.S. Healthcare System
Course Description
This course provides for a systematic evaluation of US Healthcare at both macro- and micro-levels of transformation from historical influence and since implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) reform. Concepts and definitions are introduced through investigation of organizational structure, roles, operational characteristics, regulatory activities, historical influencers, and recent and current disruptors. Impact in such areas as provider types and roles, care delivery models, and quality initiatives are discussed.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM502 - Organizational Behavior Human Resources in Healthcare
Course Description
In this course the student will focus on the application of theory to develop the knowledge and skills needed to effectively manage individuals and groups in healthcare organizations. Topics include human behavior, organizational behavior, human resource management, and labor relation policies. Recommended Prior Course: HCM500
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM505 - Principles of Population Health
Course Description
Students will analyze the skills needed to assess and enhance the health of a community. Students will focus on health behaviors, environmental influences, health policy, and economic and healthcare system issues in health promotion and disease prevention.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM515 - Health Law and Ethics
Course Description
In this course students will explore policy trends and the legal and ethical challenges inherent in the administration of healthcare services. Topics include governmental reforms, policy process model, regulation of healthcare false claims, fraud and abuse, antitrust compliance and litigation, informed consent, and principals and legal basis for hospital governance and healthcare malpractice insurance.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM520 - Quality and Performance Improvement in Healthcare
Course Description
In this course students will complete an in-depth examination of the relationships between healthcare quality and organizational performance. Students will be introduced to quality improvement and patient safety theories, models, methods and tools that have an application on addressing the challenge of improving the quality and safety of the healthcare system.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM532 - Healthcare Change Management, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship
Course Description
In this course students focus on the unique skills related to leading change management, innovation, and entrepreneurship processes in healthcare. Students will evaluate change management and innovation skills and attributes necessary to guide organizations and people through the process of innovation in a way that ensures successful innovation outcomes. Also, students will examine fundamental organizational, personal, cultural, and competitive issues and challenges related to organizational change in the twenty-first century healthcare environment. Various models of organizational change will be identified and critically evaluated for use in this setting.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM542 - Healthcare Operations Management
Course Description
Students will examine the framework of operations management in healthcare operations. Students will discuss and research supply chain and inventory management, operational assessment, patient flow management, support care processes, performance, scheduling, and productivity through process improvement. Students will utilize analytical techniques to assess performance data and to identify trends and issues to improve patient care outcomes. Determining factors to achieve quality management in healthcare facilities will be explored.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM555 - Health Informatics & Population Health Analytics
Course Description
Students will explore strategies for gathering population information from primary and secondary data sources, using analytics to assess the health needs of the populations under study. Students will examine the value proposition for "clinical intelligence" and the role of analytics in supporting a data-driven, evidence-based practice in population health management. Students will evaluate the use of health information in the context of population health informatics. Students will comprehend the data gathering processes, leading to an exchange of data, while supporting population health surveillance through statistical and visual analytics.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM565 - Healthcare Finance
Course Description
Students will focus on financial concepts and application of these concepts in healthcare settings.  Students will examine how to develop, apply, and interpret various financial tools and concepts. These concepts include financial statements analysis, cost structure and allocation, dashboards, budgeting and variance analysis, sources of revenue and reimbursement, return on investment analysis, financial ratios, capital budgeting and investment decision making, and working capital management. Recommended Prior Course: HCM500
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM570 - Healthcare Information Systems
Course Description
Students will examine core knowledge and skills needed to oversee the information technology and informatics in a healthcare environment. Topics include how to identify and solve organizational problems affecting the design, implementation, and use of health information management systems and data throughout the enterprise. Students analyze the functions and interoperability of various systems including regulatory requirements, how to assure the confidentiality of patient information, and recent trends in the changing healthcare landscape.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM575 - Population Health Program Assessment, Implementation, and Evaluation
Course Description
In this course, students analyze population and community health needs and resources, program design and implementation, and evaluation as core functions of population health practice. Students are provided with essential tools and a knowledge base to conduct effective population health and community-based health promotion activities with a diverse array of populations and health issues.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM580 - Capstone: Strategic Management in Healthcare
Course Description
Students will examine the components of organizational strategy development and execution as healthcare systems evolve in value-based delivery and a consumer participation focus. Students analyze the strategic planning process, assess and utilize analytic tools, develop organizational strategies, investigate competitive advantage, and use critical thinking and decision making to create a strategic plan for a healthcare organization.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HCM595 - Healthcare Management Internship
Course Description
In this elective course students have an opportunity to demonstrate outcomes acquired in the Master of Healthcare Administration program within a healthcare setting.  Students will work under the supervision of both faculty and organizational personnel. Discussions and assignments are designed to combine theory and professional practice and include weekly journals, a mid-term conference with the instructor, faculty internship coordinator, and on-site supervisor, as well as a final report reviewing the internship experience. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite 3 Core Courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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History

 

HST201 - U.S. History I
Course Description
This course focuses on the history of the United States from the founding of the North American colonies to the 1877 Reconstruction era. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education History requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course (GT-HI1) for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HST202 - U.S. History II
Course Description
This course is a survey from the end of the Reconstruction in 1877 until the recent past. It addresses economic, political, and social issues of topics including industrialization, urbanization, population changes, the rise of the United States to global power, the Great Depression, the New Deal, the world wars, the Great Society, the counterculture, technology implications, and the Cold War. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education History requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course (GT-HI1) for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HST300 - U.S. History (1945-Present)
Course Description
HST300 examines major political and historical trends from the end of World War II through the present. Major themes include the Cold War, the demise of colonialism, the rise of a Civil Rights movement, the collapse of the Soviet Empire, the backlash against Liberalism, the emergence of a global economy, and the effects of technological development. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education History requirement.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HST500 - Topics in U.S. History
Course Description
Topical history course that focuses on issues specific to United States history.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HST501 - Topics in Latin American History
Course Description
Topical history course that focuses on issues specific to Latin American history.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HST502 - Topics in the History of Colonialism
Course Description
Topical history course that focuses on issues specific to the global history of colonialism.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HST503 - Topics in U.S. Colonial History
Course Description
Topical history course that focuses on issues specific to the history of colonialism in the present United States.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HST504 - Topics in U.S. Immigration History
Course Description
Topical history course that focuses on issues specific to the topic of immigration in the United States.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HST505 - Topics in the History of US Wars and Warfare
Course Description
Topical history course that focuses on issues specific to the history of wars and warfare in the United States.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Homeland Security

 

HLS300 - Introduction to Homeland Security
Course Description
The purpose of this undergraduate course is to provide the student with a global overview of homeland security. It reviews the history of homeland security, emphasizing organizational structure, case law, and policy creation in response to, and as a result of, the dynamic threat environment affecting the United States. It addresses the connections and unified approach among federal, state, and local governments from a policy and procedure perspective. Finally, the course addresses both domestic and international issues in homeland security and the current and trending challenges in this field.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HLS350 - Terrorism
Course Description
The purpose of this undergraduate course is to provide the student with an understanding of terrorism and the history and concepts of global terrorism including groups, ideologies, and motivations threatening homeland security. It addresses forms of terrorism including state-sponsored, transnational, domestic, and international organizations focusing on similarities, differences, and objectives. It explains counter-terrorism operations from a conceptual basis and identifies multi-agency programs and outcomes established for effective operations. The readings range from the historical origins of terrorism to modern cases of terrorism seen in the world today. On completion of this course, students should be able to identify terrorist organizations both national and international and understand their motivations and methods.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HLS375 - Risk Analysis and Mitigation
Course Description
This course provides visibility into the threat spectrum including the systematic approaches in identifying critical infrastructures and key resources as a basis for risk acceptance and mitigation. In understanding risk and vulnerability, students learn to address appropriate countermeasures in an objective, quantifiable way.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HLS400 - Critical Infrastructure + Key Resource (CIKR) Identification and Protection
Course Description
This course provides a high level understanding of critical infrastructures and key resources. Topics include the critical infrastructure protection process and an examination of its components: people, physical entities, and information systems. This course places CIKR in the context of the nation's overarching National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) and examines the interchange required for an integrated program. Further, it addresses the risk-informed resource allocation process as a key resource prioritization component.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HLS450 - Intelligence
Course Description
This course provides an understanding of the intelligence cycle as it relates to homeland security. Topics include intelligence collection, analysis, and dissemination with a review on the historical context of intelligence and its role in decision making. The course also addresses the different intelligence disciplines of structures, missions, and products. The use of case studies covering past, present, and future challenges to intelligence operations and homeland security counter measures are also discussed for threat assessment and risk analysis.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Human Resource Management

 

HRM300 - Principles of Human Resource Management
Course Description
Throughout HRM300, students will explore the history and future of HRM practices. They will learn about HRM theories and how to apply them in a real-world environment. Details regarding HR functions such as recruitment, selection and onboarding, training and development, performance management, compensation and benefits, and the legal aspects of employee and labor relations will be addressed throughout this course.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM350 - Compensation and Performance Management
Course Description
Students will learn how organizations recruit and retain the best talent through ensuring comprehensive and competitive total compensation packages. Topics include compensation and benefits, work-life balance/wellness, performance and service recognition, additional perks and reward structures, as well as career development opportunities. Additionally, students will identify why total compensation and reward offerings should be aligned with an organization’s mission, values, goals, and vision.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM435 - Creating a Diverse and Ethical Workforce
Course Description
Students will learn how to lead a diverse and ethical workforce to gain competitive advantage. The topics of diversity, equity and inclusion are important behaviors that organizations promote and enforce and their impact on organizational culture will be explored. Students will learn how laws and policies can help develop an equitable and inclusive multicultural and multigenerational workplace. Students will also explore how culture impacts ethics, diversity, equity, and inclusion. Additionally, tips and techniques to aid in managing diversity-related challenges and conflicts will be addressed.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM440 - Recruitment, Selection and Employee Development
Course Description
In HRM440, students will gain an understanding of the critical steps and processes involved in attracting quality candidates, selecting the best applicants for hire, and retaining productive and motivated employees. Specifically, students will identify how to assess a candidate’s competencies, qualifications, and cultural fit. Additionally, information about employee orientation, onboarding, and socialization will be addressed. Finally, the steps associated with creating meaningful employee training and development programs will be explored.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM445 - Labor Relations and Employment Law
Course Description
The purpose of this course is to explore the interrelationship between HR function, employment regulations and legal advancements as HR professionals must understand how the law impacts policies and procedures with regards to recruiting, hiring, managing employees, and terminating employees, as well as everyday workplace practices/behaviors. Throughout this course, students will gain an understanding of how an organization’s culture and policies/practices are impacted by ethical, legal, and moral considerations, as well as reflect on how organizational improvements could be made to enhance compliance with laws, legislation, and employment trends.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM460 - Organizational Development
Course Description
Students will explore how internal and external factors influence the need for organizational development change at the individual, team, and group levels. Students will demonstrate their ability to apply theories and metrics to make recommendations for short- and long-term organizational changes.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM470 - Human Resource Management in a Global World
Course Description
Technological advancements and global changes/ challenges continue to impact HR’s function. Students learn how globalization and technological advancements impact organizations. Students will explore the benefits and challenges of globalization and technological changes on HRM practices and organizational culture.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM481 - Capstone: Managing and Leading Human Capital
Course Description
The purpose of HRM481 is to apply theory and content to HRM topics such as strategic planning, workforce planning, employee and labor relations, compensation and benefits, training and development, and legal and ethical aspects of Human Resource Management. Throughout the course students will demonstrate knowledge acquired throughout the undergraduate HRM program by completing a comprehensive Program Portfolio Project.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM495 - Human Resource Management Practicum
Course Description
This course is designed for students as an opportunity to demonstrate program outcomes learned in the B.S. in Human Resources Management under the supervision of both faculty and organizational personnel. Assignments are designed to combine theory and professional practice and include weekly journals, a mid-term conference with the instructor, faculty practicum coordinator, and on-site supervisor, as well as a final report reviewing the practicum experience. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite: HRM300.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM500 - Managing Human Resources
Course Description
Throughout HRM500, students will learn about how to lead Human Capital from a business, cultural and HRM perspective. Students will review foundational Human Capital Management theories and concepts. Students will also learn about how investing in people yields a return. Students will explore the behavioral competencies required of Human Capital professionals across borders. Students will be introduced to how analytics and metrics impact the leadership decision making process.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM510 - Organizational Behavior and Development
Course Description
Students will learn how to apply various organizational behavior (OB) and organizational development (OD) strategies to improve organizational outcomes and enhance organizational success. Effective communication, collaboration and leadership skills will be studied as tools for enhancing OB and OD in organizations. Students will gain an understanding of organizational change strategies and theories to optimize individual, group, and organizational processes and functions.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM515 - Legal and Human Resource Dimensions of Business Management
Course Description
Students will explore federal and international laws that govern the workplace environment. Students will also learn how to proactively mitigate preventable workplace issues, thus ensuring a culture of legal, ethical, and organizational compliance.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM540 - Strategic Workforce Planning and Advancement
Course Description
HRM540 explores the impact of strategic workforce planning on recruitment, retention, and advancement efforts. Throughout this course, students will learn about proactive, forward-thinking, and strategic staffing techniques. Students will explore the steps associated with determining organizational needs, developing a recruitment plan, and selecting quality candidates, as well as developing, retaining and advancing organizational employees. Furthermore, students will understand how to approach and overcome external and internal factors that can influence the workforce planning and staffing process.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM550 - Strategic Labor Relations
Course Description
Throughout HRM550, students will explore how to successfully interact with a unionized workforce. Information about the history of unions, labor regulations, and the prevalence of unionization in today’s workplace environment will be addressed. Students will learn how employment practices are similar and different when interacting with a unionized versus non-unionized workforce. Dispute and conflict resolution techniques, including grievances, mediation, and arbitration, will be discussed.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM560 - Talent Development
Course Description
HRM560 focuses on the benefits of various talent development and performance management techniques to retain a strong and capable workforce. Throughout this course, students will learn about the importance of quality onboarding and orientation processes as well as the necessity of investing in performance management. The roles of HR, leaders, and stakeholders in encouraging a culture of employee growth and development will be addressed.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM570 - Global Human Resource Leadership
Course Description
Throughout HRM570, you will examine the various aspects, theories, concepts, and practices associated withinternational human resource management (IHRM) and how IHRM can impact a global organization’s success. Specifically, you will explore various concepts and theories associated with managing a global workforce, including the complexities of outsourcing, expatriate challenges for employees and their families, coordinating training and development within differing cultures, and international issues associated with compensation,employee evaluation, and discipline. You will obtain a solid understanding about aspects associated with international business and how factors internal and external to an organization can impact the company’s success. Furthermore, you will examine how human resource professionals can play a strategic role in collaborating with leadership to build a productive, inclusive, and profitable global business. Recommended prior course: HRM500.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM580 - Capstone: Leading Human Capital
Course Description
Students will apply the advanced theoretical and practical knowledge attained throughout the Master’s in Human Resource Management program through a research project. Students will utilize and integrate their academic knowledge and real-world experiences to strategize human resource-related solutions that can aid in improving organizational growth and development.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HRM595 - Human Resource Management Internship
Course Description
In this course, students participate on the staff of a Human Resources Management or related professional team under the co-supervision of faculty and agency personnel. Weekly journals and a mid-term report are required and combine theory and observation of professional practice. Other course requirements include a mid-term conference with the faculty internship coordinator and evaluation of the on-site supervisor. On-site hours are determined by credit hours. Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete three courses (nine credits) prior to taking the Internship. Students complete their internships over a period of 8 weeks during one CSU Global course. A minimum of 80 hours of internship fieldwork must be completed during the course. This course may not be available in all states; see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite 3 Core Courses.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Human Services

 

HSM300 - Introduction to Human Services
Course Description
This course provides students with an overview of the human services field including theoretical models for delivery and the roles and responsibilities of human services workers. Students explore human services occupations, professional organizations, and community resources as well as ethical and legal issues. Students engage in several key areas of the human services field including but not limited to law, diversity, mental health, institutions, private and nonprofit organizations, and the scope of building a career in human services.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSM320 - Human Development
Course Description
This course explores theories and research in human development. Topics include physical, language, intellectual, moral, personality, social, and emotional development as they relate to the human services professional.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSM350 - Intervention Methods in Human Services
Course Description
This course is an introduction to the theories, principles, and skills of the general helping process in human services practice. Students learn how to engage a client as well as assessment, intervention, and follow-up as applied to individuals, groups, and families. Prerequisite: HSM300.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSM400 - Crisis Intervention for Human Services Professionals
Course Description
This course explores the assessment of diverse crisis situations. It emphasizes the use of short-term intervention and problem-solving techniques to help individuals and families de-escalate crises and develop appropriate coping techniques. Students will explore the skills, techniques, and uses of crisis intervention. Prerequisite: HSM350.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSM405 - Case Management in Human Services
Course Description
This course teaches the principles, practices, and issues in human services case management with emphasis on prevention and intervention strategies. Topics include listening skills, planning, assessment of community resources, referral procedures, general crisis intervention, and setting appropriate boundaries. Prerequisite: HSM400. Students cannot receive credit for HSM405 and HSC373 as they are considered duplicative.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSM420 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Human Services
Course Description
This course explores the roles, functions, and legal/ethical responsibilities of human services workers, including the process of ethical decision making and awareness of the moral and legal complexities in the field of human services. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSM450 - Human Services Administration
Course Description
This course introduces students to human services management. Students gain a basic understanding of organizational management perspectives by exploring issues of staff supervision and oversight as well as administrative planning in a human services organization. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSM470 - Evaluation of Research and Theory in Human Services
Course Description
This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to use research to inform practice in human services. Students will learn the basic ideas governing scientific inquiry in human services settings, including the formulation of research questions and review of related scientific literature. Emphasis will be placed on the skills required to connect theoretical knowledge with practical application to research with individuals, families, communities, and human services programs. Students will develop an understanding of both the ethical considerations and the issues related to human diversity involved in performing, evaluating, and using research within human services.
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSM476 - Seminar in Human Services
Course Description
In this preparatory course for the Capstone project, each student will propose and conduct a research project that integrates theory into practice. The primary purpose of the research project is to demonstrate application of knowledge and skills in human services. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all core and specialization coursework except HSM480. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

HSM480 - Capstone: Human Services
Course Description
HSM480 is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned throughout their time in the Human Services Program. Through a capstone project, students will synthesize and integrate the Human Services knowledge, theories, and skills they have developed throughout their coursework to address an individual or community issue, problem, or information gap. Students should have gone through the entire degree path and have a working knowledge of what Human Services entails, including skills for serving individuals and communities in the field. On successful completion of the capstone course, students will have met all of the program outcomes for the Human Services degree.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Humanities

 

HUM101 - Critical Reasoning
Course Description
This course includes a practical application of the subject of critical reasoning to help students learn and apply the skills in the coursework and everyday life. Students examine the processes of rhetoric, reasoning, and writing short critical-thinking essays on current events in an online forum in order to more clearly, insightfully, and effectively think and communicate. Students will also develop the abilities to solve problems, analyze topics, and make well informed decisions by utilizing their life experiences and current events. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Arts and Humanities requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course (GT-AH3) for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Information Systems Management

 

ISM501 - IT Management
Course Description
This course prepares students to analyze organizational issues in information technology (IT) and proposed the necessary solutions to address business needs. Students gain a detailed understanding of how to manage, oversee, plan and maintain IT systems and resources. Students also learn how to effectively manage IT professionals as either employees or outside consultants. Topics include: IT management principles, IT risk management, project management, systems maintenance and leadership.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ISM511 - Managing Virtualized and Cloud Systems
Course Description
This course prepares students to manage and develop technology solutions utilizing both virtualized and cloud-based systems. Students gain an understanding of various virtualization technologies and how they should be implemented. Additionally students evaluate a variety of cloud-based solutions and providers to increase organizational efficiency, redundancy and business continuity. Topics include: comparison of cloud-providers and technologies, the implementation and maintenance of virtualized infrastructure and servers and how to design fault-tolerant systems with virtualization technology. Recommended Prior Course: ISM501
Credit Hours: 3

 

ISM521 - Managing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems
Course Description
This course prepares students to design, evaluate and manage enterprise-level systems commonly used in mission critical applications. Students gain knowledge in a variety of common enterprise resource planning (ERP) applications such as payroll, budgeting, human resources, inventory and sales. Topics include systems selection, maintenance and planning. Additionally the ability to compare and contrast distinct service providers is also presented. Recommended Prior Course: ISM501, ISM511
Credit Hours: 3

 

ISM525 - Ethical Considerations in Managing Information Technology
Course Description
This course provides information about the ethical considerations and issues that IT professionals encounter in the workplace given their exposure to data, various forms of electronic communication, and other types of information. Students will evaluate and interpret information technology policies and regulations and discuss the implications for ethical decisions by IT professionals and IT leadership. Prerequisite: ISM501
Credit Hours: 3

 

ISM527 - Cyber Security Management
Course Description
This course provides insight into the complex implementation and management of cyber security practices. Students perform risk assessments and recommend mitigations to protect digital assets in the workplace as well as discuss disaster recovery, incident handling, cyber security policy implementation, privacy, and legal issues related to cyber security. Prerequisite: ISM501
Credit Hours: 3

 

ISM529 - Emerging Cyber Security Technology, Threats, and Defense
Course Description
This course provides students with the opportunity to explore and examine emerging trends and technology in cyber security. Students analyze organizations and review the feasibility of adopting new cyber security trends in order to provide competitive advantages in the workplace. This course also evaluates necessary policy and procedure changes within the context of the continued evolution of technology. Prerequisite: ISM501
Credit Hours: 3

 

ISM530 - Enterprise Cyber Security
Course Description
This course provides students with insight into the cyber security issues surrounding an enterprise including securing organizational data, responding to cyber based security breaches, emerging technologies, and ensuring a secured computing environment for safeguarding company information. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ISM531 - Cyber Security Defense and Countermeasures
Course Description
The Cyber Security Defense and Countermeasures course prepares students to defend enterprise networks from web based and internal attacks using techniques such as system hardening, encryption, policy enforcement and software/hardware intrusion detection systems to protect enterprise data assets.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ISM545 - Information Technology Auditing and Assurance
Course Description
This course provides students with a foundation and understanding of IT auditing services used in midsized to large organizations. Students will focus on security, integrity, and availability of information systems while integrating financial, performance, and operational auditing and assurance services. Prerequisites: ISM501 and ISM525
Credit Hours: 3

 

ISM550 - Information Systems and Security
Course Description
This course presents a broad overview of possible issues and dangers that can compromise information systems in the workplace. Students learn the roles, responsibilities, and essential tools needed by IT Managers to secure an organization's data and operations. Prerequisites: ISM501 and ISM511
Credit Hours: 3

 

ISM561 - Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery
Course Description
This course cover a variety of concepts in the areas of business continuity and disaster recover. Students gain an understanding of business continuity strategies, business impact analysis, recovery point objectives (RTO and RPO), planning techniques and also how to recover from disasters. Topics include risk assessment, fault tolerance, risk acceptance, risk transfer, backup strategies, off-site storage and business resilience. Recommended Prior Course: ISM501
Credit Hours: 3

 

ISM581 - Capstone: Information Technology Management
Course Description
The capstone course allows the students to review an organization’s needs and address all the challenges involved with implementing and or changing information technology in a complex organization. Students will analyze organizational objectives and propose a solution and a full implementation plan. The proposed solution must address strategies for overcoming the challenges of IT related projects such as assessing risks, reduction of funding, and keeping the support of executive management. Students will utilize skills gained throughout the program to demonstrate the ability to design an IT project from conception to post deployment. Prerequisite: All core, specialization, and/or concentration courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ISM595 - Information Technology Management Internship
Course Description
In this course, students participate in an Information Technology or related professional team under the co-supervision of faculty and organizational personnel. Weekly journals and a mid-term report are required with the objective of combining theory and observation of professional practice. Other course requirements include a mid-term conference with the instructor, faculty internship coordinator, and evaluation by the on-site supervisor as well as a final report reviewing the internship experience. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policy. Prerequisites: Students must successfully complete three courses (nine credits) prior to taking the internship course. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Information Technology Services

 

ITS310 - Introduction to Computer-Based Systems (Personal Computing)
Course Description
This course is an in-depth study of personal computer hardware, peripherals, and interfaces. It prepares students for the Essentials portion of the CompTIA A+ certification exam. Students are prepared to diagnose, troubleshoot, and maintain personal computer systems. It also provides a detailed overview of common peripheral devices and discusses how to connect them to personal computers. A simulated lab environment is incorporated into the course. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS315 - Introduction to Networks
Course Description
This course provides an overview of computer networks including operating systems, networks, the internet and information system design, and the roles and responsibilities of technology professionals. Students are prepared for CompTIA Network+ and Testout Network Pro certification exams. Students also learn about wireless network and network security, and develop the ability to diagnose and troubleshoot common networking problem and issues. Recommended Prior Course: ITS310. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS320 - Basic Programming
Course Description
This course provides a detailed overview of fundamental programming, design, and testing concepts using Python. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of Python scripting and will become proficient in writing modular Python classes. At the core of class method development, students will write Python methods using lists, dictionaries, conditional logic, and looping controls. Recommended Prior Course: ITS310. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS325 - Technology, Ethics, and Global Community
Course Description
The course provides an exploration of the relationships between science, ethics, and technology, and the understanding of their roles in the global community. Students will understand and apply cyber law to the global marketplace as well as provide examples of Internet business models and how they are impacted by patent law. Students will gain a detailed understanding of the relationship that exists between technology and ethics from a business perspective. Prerequisite: ITS310.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS330 - Web Design and Development
Course Description
This course offers an introduction to design principles, practices, processes, and technologies associated with web design. Students will gain an understanding of HTML programming, cascading style sheets, and JavaScript. Students will explore the affects of web compliance and accessibility standards on web design. Prerequisite: ITS320.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS335 - Human Computer Interaction
Course Description
This course provides an introduction to Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) theories. Students will gain an understanding of the components required to design, evaluate, and implement and interactive computing system. The course will introduce concepts related to human psychology and perception, computer and interface system design, and system analysis. Prerequisite: ITS330.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS340 - Introduction to Programming with JavaScript
Course Description
In this course, students will learn object-oriented programming concepts using the JavaScript language. Students will demonstrate the ability to apply concepts of software design, encapsulation, and testing using JavaScript. Students will apply the JavaScript language in the creation of interactive web applications. Prerequisite: ITS320. This course is no longer available. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS345 - Web Development with PHP
Course Description
In this course, students will demonstrate the ability to creating web applications using the PHP scripting language. Students will be able to develop database-driven web applications using an appropriate database. Students will gain the knowledge necessary to create client and server web application components. Prerequisite: ITS320. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS350 - Information Systems and Security
Course Description
Education in the need for security, planning, cryptology, and security technologies. Prepares students for CompTIA Security+ certification exam. Recommended Prior Course: ITS310 or ITS315. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS360 - Introduction to Cyber Security and Digital Crime
Course Description
This course provides students with an introduction to cyber security and digital crime to information technology professionals interested in information security. Students will learn about information security threats, dangers, and risks that organizations face in the workplace as well as the ability to analyze potential vulnerabilities that can have an adverse impact on digital assets. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS400 - Information Technology Project Management
Course Description
Prepares managers to develop an IT strategy that aligns business strategy with IT infrastructure for a competitive advantage. Prepares students for the CompTIA Project+ certification. Recommended Prior Course: ITS310 or ITS315. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS405 - Intermediate Networking
Course Description
 This course addresses configuration and management of hybrid network infrastructure. Students will gain valuable knowledge configuring hybrid network infrastructure, managing hosts and resources. Students will also learn about how to implement identity and access in hybrid environment. Recommended Prior Course: ITS315. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS410 - Database Management
Course Description
This course teaches students to design, implement, and use database management systems. Students gain a working knowledge of available software packages, concepts of query languages, software integration services, and security considerations. Students will also learn fundamentals of structured query language (SQL) in developing common queries and reports. Note: Access to a Windows-based operating system is required for this class. Recommended Prior Course: ITS310 or ITS315; ITS320.  
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS411 - Principles of Database Security
Course Description
This course will provide students with an understanding of concepts and techniques that can be utilized to create secure database systems. Students will learn secure data models that can be used in database development. Students will identify appropriate access control mechanisms and trust management techniques that can be integrated into a database system. Note: Access to a Windows-based operating system required for this class. 
Prerequisite: ITS410 Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS415 - Principles of Cyber Security
Course Description
This course provides an overview of cybersecurity threats, compromises and the related protection mechanisms. Topics include security of communications, networks and infrastructures. The course also discusses best practices in security policies, cyber forensics, incident management and business continuity plan. This course prepares students for the SSCP (ISC2) certification. Prerequisite: ITS310 Credit Hours: 3
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS420 - Advanced Networking Systems
Course Description
This course presents advanced network and systems concepts to the student utilizing Linux. Students gain an understanding of the basics of networking routing and switching. They also examine and practice the concepts and skills necessary to function as a system administrator in a Linux environment. It prepares students for the Linux+ certification exam. Prerequisite: ITS315. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS425 - Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing
Course Description
This course provides students with the experience needed to secure information systems against attacks such as viruses, worms, as well as other system weaknesses that pose a significant danger to organizational data by using ethical hacking and penetration testing to uncover common techniques used by cyber criminals to exploit system vulnerabilities. Prerequisite: ITS415. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS430 - Network Enterprise Solutions
Course Description
This course addresses practical methods for analyzing business problems and designing large-scale software solutions using object-oriented solutions. This course introduces students to implement backend Windows services such as DNS and DHCP. Students also learn to implement high availability solutions for critical business services. Prerequisite: ITS315.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS435 - AWS Cloud Administrator
Course Description
This course provides students with an overview of the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud. Students will be introduced to AWS core services, security and compliance concepts, access management, and deploying and operating AWS Cloud. Students will gain knowledge of various pricing models of AWS. It also helps students prepare for the AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner exam.
Prerequisite: ITS315 Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS439 - Virtualization Technology Fundamentals
Course Description
This course provides students with an introduction to the concept of virtualization. Virtualization is achieved through the use of both hardware and software in a manner that gives the perception that a physical environment exists when, in fact, it may not. Students will understand how operating systems in a computer utilize virtual memory to provide applications with the ability to run better and faster without adding more physical memory. Students will explore the concept of server virtualization, which similarly gives the appearance and benefit of having multiple processors running simultaneously. Students will evaluate the present status and future direction of virtualization. Actual virtualization software will be used to provide students with a real-world experience. This course aligns with the VMware Data Center Virtualization Fundamentals certification.  Note: Access to a Windows-based operating system is required for this class. Prerequisite: ITS315. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS441 - Cloud Technology Fundamentals
Course Description
Students in this course are introduced to the concepts of cloud technology, which has caused a paradigm shift in electronic storage and security. Students will understand the manner in which companies utilize their cloud-based servers and other storage devices to dynamically adjust the available storage based on demand. Students will also gain an understanding of the added security risks that companies are now faced with as a result of cloud technology. In this course, students will learn about implementations of cloud technology, including SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS. In addition, cloud-based data storage solutions will be covered. This course maps to and adheres to the CompTIA Cloud+ certification. Prerequisite: ITS439. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS442 - Enterprise Cloud Computing
Course Description
This course emphasizes the business applications of cloud computing. Students will learn about cloud computing concepts, architecture, and service management. They will understand the advantages and disadvantages associated with a cloud computing platform for business applications, such as those related to financial feasibility, business benefits, and security risks. Students will learn to apply standards and best practices to evaluate alternative cloud solutions in determining which is most appropriate for a given business environment. This course also includes a teamwork component that is based on project management principles to design a cloud-based application. Prerequisite: ITS441
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS443 - Server Virtualization Technologies
Course Description
Students in this course will learn the skills to design, implement, manage, and maintain a virtualization infrastructure using current Microsoft Virtualization technologies. The course provides details on how to deploy and manage Hyper-V and Remote Desktop Services on Windows Servers. The course also provides details on how to manage a server virtualization environment by using System Center products such as System Center Virtual Machine Manager (VMM), System Center Operations Manager, System Center Data Protection Manager, and System Center Configuration Manager. In addition, students will explore the Windows Azure capabilities for virtual machines and managing a hybrid cloud, including Windows Azure’s Internet as a Service (IaaS) and storage capabilities. This course aligns with the Microsoft Monitoring and Operating a Private Cloud with System Center 2012 exam 70-246. Prerequisite: Experience with Windows Servers; ITS442. This course is no longer available.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS446 - Securing Virtual and Cloud Systems
Course Description
Students in this course are introduced to the concepts of virtualization security including the types of virtualization, the importance of securing virtualized networks and discussions of the various virtualization program offerings. Additionally, students in this course are introduced to the concepts of cloud security. Students will understand the strategy for securely implementing network policies and integrating virtual networks into the existing physical infrastructure. Students will also gain an understanding of how to analyze and implement security for public and private clouds. In this course, students will learn about implementations of effective practices for securing virtual machines without creating additional operational overhead for administrators. In addition, students will learn how to protect networks, operating systems and applications in various cloud deployments. Prerequisite: ITS443
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS455 - Digital Forensics and Investigations
Course Description
This course provides students with an insight to cyber security professional intrusion detection methods, information security tools, and preventative measures to information security risks. Students will learn how to respond to cyber breaches which includes the recovery, preservation, analysis of digital crime scene evidence, and proper incident response to cyber criminals. Prerequisite: ITS415
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS460 - Information Security Legal and Ethical Issues
Course Description
In this course students will examine how law, ethics, and technology intersect in organizations that rely on information technology. Students will gain an understanding and insight into issues arising from privacy, secrecy, access control, and policy enforcement, as well as other legal and ethical dilemmas prevalent in today’s organizations. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS462 - Introduction to IT Auditing
Course Description
This course provides an introduction to appropriate principles and guidelines that can be used in information security for information technology auditing. An overview of skills and techniques will be presented to evaluate potential risks in IT environments. Students will gain the ability to evaluate and quantify risks to reduce potential IT threats.
Prerequisite: ITS411 Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS480 - Capstone: Information Technology
Course Description
This course will allow for students to complete an academic project that represents a culmination of their knowledge in Information Technology. Students will demonstrate the ability to review, analyze, and integrate appropriate IT concepts into a capstone project.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS481 - Cybersecurity Capstone
Course Description
In this course, students will apply cybersecurity principles to real-world scenarios and complete a project that represents a culmination of their knowledge in Cybersecurity. Students will demonstrate the ability to review, analyze, and integrate appropriate cybersecurity concepts into a capstone project.
Prerequisite: ITS455 ITS460 Credit Hours: 3

 

ITS495 - Information Technology Practicum
Course Description
This course is designed for students as an opportunity to demonstrate program outcomes learned in the B.S. Information Technology under the supervision of both faculty and organizational personnel. Assignments are designed to combine theory and professional practice and include weekly journals, a mid-term conference with the instructor, faculty practicum coordinator, and on-site supervisor, as well as a final report reviewing the practicum experience. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite: ITS320, ITS410, and ITS430. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Interdisciplinary Professional Studies

 

IPS450 - Individualized Learning Portfolio
Course Description
IPS450 is the terminal capstone for the Bachelor’s Program in Interdisciplinary Professional Studies. In this course, you will link all of the courses in your specific program of study into a research project that highlights your learning experiences. You will then craft a coherent and focused thesis that blends theory and research knowledge into practice. You will learn the techniques required to conduct an academic research project, as well as the techniques required to write a senior thesis paper.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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International Management

 

MIM500 - Business Strategy in the Global Economy
Course Description
This course addresses the role of international political and economic issues and the challenges facing trade and foreign business policies in developing nations that seek to attract business investments. Students evaluate the potential business opportunities and the risks associated with global expansion projects, as well as the role of labor and access to natural resources, and the utilization of International Monetary Fund (IMF) resources and foreign investment. Analyses of cultural, economic, societal, and political differences framed within the context of international commerce provide a background for strategic decisions.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIM510 - International Trade
Course Description
This course addresses the theory and role that international trade plays in economic integration and development through trade policy. Students review regional and country-specific political agendas, including protectionism and sanctions, and gain an understanding of a multinational approach to trade regulations.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIM520 - Global Financial Management
Course Description
In this course, students examine the corporate financial management process considering international variations relevant to conducting business globally. Topics include global financial markets, foreign exchange and derivatives markets, risks associated with foreign investment, and regulatory issues affecting foreign investment.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIM530 - Technology Management in the Global Economy
Course Description
This course covers the many components and processes of managing technology within the global business environment. Topics include strategic decision-making, exploring emerging technologies and their implications for business, innovation, organizational culture and structures, ethics, and legal concerns. Students also learn about the role of technology in positioning an organization in the global market.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIM560 - International Business
Course Description
This course examines the factors that affect international business. Topics include the analysis of a country for prospective business opportunities, including the assessment of internal cultural and societal characteristics, how economic policies and regulations relate to trade activities, natural resource, labor, and outsourcing opportunities and their influence on the advancement of multinational enterprises. Challenging and unique considerations in the formulation and execution of organizational expansion considerations are addressed.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Library

 

LIB300 - Research in the Information Age
Course Description
This course focuses on the Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education put out by the Association of College and Research Libraries. 
Credit Hours: 1

 

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Management

 

MGT200 - Business and Technology Professional Studies
Course Description
In this cross-disciplinary class, students learn about career opportunities in business management, computer science, information technology, marketing, project management, management information systems, healthcare administration, and other business-related career areas. Students gain insights into recognizing individual strengths and interests to focus on career areas that enhance opportunities for personal growth and an understanding of concepts and skills necessary to complete typical workplace activities.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT300 - Principles of Management
Course Description
Students examine the essential functions of management, including planning, organizing, leading, staffing, and controlling, and how they can be utilized to strengthen management, employee, and organizational performance.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT305 - Introduction to International Business
Course Description
This introductory course in international business explores how U.S. firms function within international environments. The course also presents a thorough review of the economics of international trade and the global monetary system. Students examine and apply strategies of international business and assess the role of international business within a global society.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT315 - Business Law
Course Description
The course includes topics relevant to businesses operating in the United States, including the U.S. legal system, contract law, employment law, accounting law, tort law, and intellectual property. Digital technology, business globalization, and ethics are integrated throughout the course.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT350 - Business Policy and Strategy
Course Description
This course includes the process of formulating, implementing, and evaluating business strategies. Policy creation designed to support implementation of the strategic plan is addressed. Students gain knowledge of how business strategies establish and influence the company’s position within an industry to gain a competitive position. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT351 - Organizational Innovation and Change
Course Description
Analysis of the dynamics of change and the importance of innovation within modern organizations. Emphasis on how managers can develop a culture receptive to new ideas, products, processes, and systems for improving organizational performance. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT405 - Management in the Global Economy
Course Description
The course includes topics relevant to understanding factors that influence strategic expansion efforts from an organizational and country-specific perspective. An analysis of the social, political, technological, and economic factors that influence practices and decisions in an international/global organization provides a framework for addressing global expansion.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT410 - Project Management
Course Description
This course provides students with an overview of important aspects of managing both small and large projects, including assessment of needs, development of specifications, acquisition of labor and materials, optimization of schedules, controlling costs, and ensuring outcomes and deliverables. Students learn project management techniques, ways that projects can be managed and organized, and how to plan and control a project. Utilization of software tools providing efficient and effective processes is emphasized. Students who take MGT410 should not take PJM310. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT451 - Business Policy Development and Implementation
Course Description
The course addresses business policy development and implementation of corporate strategies. Students focus on analyzing the roles and responsibilities of leaders in developing strategy, governance, and operational policies within the corporate environment. Topic areas include how corporate strategy, mission, vision, and values influence policy development, innovation, and implementation.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT475 - Strategic Innovation and Ideas
Course Description
This practical course introduces students to fundamental aspects of the strategic innovation process. It addresses the challenges of ideas development and evaluation for commercial feasibility, presenting a business case, design/ development and commercialization. It covers basic management practices and critical success factors required to excel in successful innovation, such as Corporate Governance and Social Responsibility, time-based management, corporate agility. This course would also assists in preparing students to sit for the New Product Development Professional certification offered by the Product Development & Management Association (PDMA). 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT481 - Capstone: Business Management and Strategy
Course Description
The course provides an overview of the strategic planning process recognizing that effective communication and teamwork are required for the successful implementation of the strategic plan. The course includes an analysis of the roles and responsibilities of managers as leaders in developing governance and operational policies that support the organization's successes. An emphasis on policy development and innovation supports the student's learning experience. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT495 - Business Management Practicum
Course Description
This course allows students to demonstrate program outcomes learned in the Bachelor of Science in Business Management program, under the supervision of both faculty and organizational personnel. Assignments combine theory and professional practice and include weekly journals; a mid-term conference with the instructor, faculty practicum coordinator, and on-site supervisor; and a final report reviewing the practicum experience. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite: A minimum of 3 core courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT500 - Organizational Behavior
Course Description
In this course, students examine human behavior theories and organization development theories, including concepts and processes related to management of self, teams, and the organization. Topics include personality, emotions, ethics, learning, motivation, conflict, negotiation, leadership, and followership. These topics are supported through expectations of scholarly writing requirements including library resources and APA Guidelines.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT510 - Strategy Planning
Course Description
In this course, students examine and apply the concepts and theories of strategic planning in present-day organizations. Topics include strategy development and implementation based on internal and external analysis of the organization. The course includes the perspective of both the domestic and global economy. Special attention is given to innovation, technology, and entrepreneurial perspectives. Students cannot receive credit for MGT510 and MGT545. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT535 - Global Managerial Communication
Course Description
The course is designed from a managerial perspective to focus on internal and external communication practices within organizations. Topics include analysis of models and unique methods related to global communication expectations. Upon completion of the course, students acquire an understanding of the importance of accurate and effective interpersonal communication habits. Students cannot receive credit for both MGT 535 and ORG 536. Recommended Prior Course: None
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT545 - Strategic Planning and Innovation
Course Description
This course includes the strategic planning process; conducting research, applying strategic planning tools, developing market opportunity analysis, strategy selection, and establishing organizational goals with consideration of internal and external resources, market opportunities, and return on investment. Topics include environmental scanning, industry analysis, market opportunity analysis, and tactics for achieving sustainable success.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT550 - Systems Design
Course Description
This course explores systems in relation to business, management, and research. Rather than a reductionist view, systems design focuses on entire webs of relationships viewed in the larger context to determine patterns that are dependent on time and context. Course topics include classic systems theory; new science systems theory including chaos, complexity, and self-organizing systems theories; research philosophy and methods; social systems including project teams, virtual teams, contractual and contingent workforces, and organizational structure; innovation and disruption; systems operations; and systems performance.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT571 - Strategic Product Innovation
Course Description
This practical and applied course introduces students to fundamental and advanced aspects of product development. The course addresses the challenges of idea development and evaluation for commercial feasibility, building a business case, and design/development of products and services, as well as the requirements and demands of commercialization.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT576 - Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses and Decision Making
Course Description
This course examines systematic critical thinking through related topics of qualitative analyses, quantitative analyses, and decision making. Students apply quantitative and qualitative research methods focused on strategic decision models with potential topics including ethics, innovation, change management, organization behavior, e-business and technology, collaboration, diversity, or operations management. Students may also select a specific topic based on their own area of interest related to the field of management.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT579 - Capstone: Management
Course Description
The course covers topics relevant to managing dynamic and diverse workforces and organizations. Students analyze case studies to enhance student's critical thinking abilities needed for effective decision-making using quantitative and qualitative data. A focus on sustainable business practices frames the course content. The course activities assist students in demonstrating competencies in managing organizations through complex changes in a global society.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MGT595 - Management Internship
Course Description
This course is designed for students as an opportunity to demonstrate program outcomes learned in the Master of Science in Management under the supervision of both faculty and organizational personnel. Assignments are designed to combine theory and professional practice and include weekly journals, a mid-term conference with the instructor, faculty internship coordinator, and on-site supervisor, as well as a final report reviewing the internship experience. Prerequisite 3 Core Courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Management Information Systems

 

MIS300 - Information Systems Design and Management
Course Description
Through this course students are provided with the overview of issues, processes and technology utilized in the design and management of information systems. Analysis includes needs assessment, database management, software capacity, security features, decision making applications and ethical issues associated with utilization of information systems. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS350 - Information Systems Analysis and Design
Course Description
Through this course, students are provided with the ability to design and develop systems to solve problems, integrate disparate mechanisms, and improve system efficiencies using industry standards. Recommended Prior Course: MIS300.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS370 - Web Analytics
Course Description
This course provides an overview of the tools and techniques for analyzing website data. The course will focus on interpreting website data to make decisions about performance. Topics included are clickstream analysis, measuring website success and performance, website strategy testing, keyword analysis, and social media and blog analysis. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS380 - Data Visualization I
Course Description
This course will introduce students to best practices in data visualization. Effective design, choice of chart type, effective use of color, how to explore data visually, how to build data dashboards, and how to explain concepts and results visually in a compelling way with data will be covered.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS400 - Statistics for Business Analytics
Course Description
This course will introduce students to the concepts and principles of using statistics for data analysis and decision-making. This course will cover definitions and approaches in understanding data analytics and the role that statistical analysis plays in converting data into useful information. This course will prepare non-data analytics students in understanding how to build models and use statistics for business decision-making.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS405 - Data Exploration and Literacy
Course Description
In this course, you will learn the fundamentals of organizing, cleaning, and transforming data. You will build, validate, and interpret models based on machine learning algorithms. You will also use tools to help you design, prepare, and deliver data stories based on effective visualizations.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS407 - Database Concepts
Course Description
The course covers the basics of relational databases, including basic terminology and concepts, database integrity, and normalization. The relational model will be examined in detail in order to appreciate database structure, integrity, and manipulation. Current relational database management systems will be explored and contrasted, as will basic relational database design and SQL programming. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS415 - Data Visualization II
Course Description
This course will continue the concepts of effective visualization learned in Data Visualization I. This course will use PowerBI to introduce students to using an industry tool for data visualization. Students will learn to use the PowerBI environment, prepare and transform data, create data models, create measures using DAX, create reports and dashboards.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS445 - Statistics in Business Analytics
Course Description
A study of data analysis, data production, and statistical inference. Areas of study include: surveys and designed experiments, randomization, causation, regression, and inference using hypothesis tests. This course also explores using statistical methods for the analysis of, data for an enterprise performance and quality, effectiveness, and marketability. Statistical software will be utilized to conduct a predictive analysis, analyze the results, and document the findings.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS446 - Statistics for Data Analytics Using R
Course Description
This course will introduce students to basic statistics using R. The content includes using statistics for development and application of data analysis. Students will learn how to collect, present, and analyze data to convert it into useful information. Methods used will include descriptive statistics, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis using R.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS450 - Data Mining
Course Description
Course Description Through this course students are provided with an overview of techniques for data mining.  Students will use statistical software as the primary tool for this course.  This course will cover various data mining methodologies and different analyses techniques. Recommended Prior Course: MIS445
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS455 - Data Ethics
Course Description
Through this course students will analyze the moral, social, ethical and privacy demands of collecting and managing big data. Students will explore and understand both the historical and future impact of ethics in business analytics on society ensuring protection for personal privacy and adherence to ethical values. Students will examine the importance of fairness, accountability, and transparency. The impact of laws on the storage, access, use, and sharing of information will be explored. The implementation of data governance in organizations will be emphasized.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS470 - Data Science Foundation
Course Description
This course provides an overview of the tools and techniques for analyzing data using statistics, and R Programming. Topics include data storage, linear regression, classification, linear models, tree-based learning, R programming, and graphical procedures.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS480 - Capstone: Business Analytics and Information Systems
Course Description
Through this course students are provided with the opportunity to demonstrate competency on the key domains of business analytics. Students will integrate knowledge gained throughout the program—including leadership and management principles, business policy and strategy, information systems analysis and design, database and data mining, big data, cloud computing, and statistics—to complete capstone assignments in this course. Prerequisite Course: All CORE courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS495 - Management Information Systems Practicum
Course Description
This course is designed for students as an opportunity to demonstrate program outcomes learned in the B.S. in Management Information Systems under the supervision of both faculty and organizational personnel. Assignments are designed to combine theory and professional practice and include weekly journals, a mid-term conference with the instructor, faculty practicum (coordinator, and on-site supervisor, as well as a final report reviewing the practicum experience.This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite 3 Core Courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS500 - Foundations of Data Analytics
Course Description
Through this course students are provided with an introduction to the methodologies, techniques, and tools most commonly used in data analytics. These foundational methods are from the fields of statistics, operations research, and information systems. Topics include techniques and tools for visualization, inference, forecasting, optimization, simulation, and data mining. The emphasis is on exposing the student to the techniques and software tools that are used in the industry and will be used in the rest of the program.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS505 - Data Wrangling
Course Description
This course will introduce students to the purpose and need for wrangling data. Data wrangling is the process in which data is shaped and formed for usefulness to solve business problems. Students will learn to merge, clean, shape and store data to use for analytics. Students will use tools such as Excel, Python and R to prepare data for analysis.
Prerequisite: MIS500 Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS510 - Data Mining and Visualization
Course Description
This course will provide the basic framework for conducting various data and text mining methodologies, including logistic regression analyses, classical discriminant analyses, association rule, decision tree, support vector machine, neural networks, variable reduction, cluster analysis, text analytics, and web mining. In addition, this course teaches the essential and practical skills in visualization, including computer graphics, visual data representation, physical and human vision models, numerical representation of knowledge and concepts, pattern analysis, and computational methods. Recommended Prior Course: MIS500
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS530 - Predictive Analytics
Course Description
This course covers the fundamental predictive analytics and data mining approaches applied in business. It introduces basic concepts and techniques to discover patterns in data, identify variables with the most predictive power, and develop predictive models.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS535 - Data Reporting & Visualization
Course Description
This course will provide students with an opportunity to learn how to visualize data and tell a data story using visualization tools. Students will learn to understand and determine the needs of the stakeholder by using Use Cases to provide data for decision-making. Students will also learn to create visualizations and dashboards to display an effective data story to an audience, create dashboards for monitoring metrics, and communicating complex ideas into effective results.
Prerequisite: MIS500 Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS540 - Introduction to Business Intelligence
Course Description
Through this course students are provided with an overview of Business Intelligence (BI) for an enterprise, establishing the foundation for using data in cross-functional key areas, such as accounting, sales, production, customer data, and other elements, to assist with generating actionable intelligence data for decision making in order to achieve or maintain competitive advantage in the workplace and evaluate how well corporate key performance indicators are being met.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS541 - Data Warehousing in Enterprise Environments
Course Description
This course provides students with an overview of data warehouses in an enterprise and how data is captured, analyzed, and translated into information to assist executives with streamlined information from disparate systems for effective decision making based on data for strategic and operational objectives in an enterprise.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS542 - Business Analytics
Course Description
This course provides an overview of the tools and techniques for analyzing business data in order to develop comprehensive and functional solutions. Topics include forecasting, simulation, and data modeling for complex problem analysis in medium to large organizations.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS543 - Enterprise Performance Management
Course Description
This course provides an in-depth understanding of how business intelligence aligns with the realization of organizational strategy. Topics include key performance indicators, organizational goals, and the role of effective management in meeting enterprise objectives. Prior Recommended Course: MIS540.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS545 - Advanced Data Analytics
Course Description
This course will provide hands-on application for advanced analytics to solve complex industry and business problems, using Python. This includes selecting appropriate methods to analyze data to create solutions to meet project objectives. Students will use machine learning techniques to analyze big data using for practical problem solving. Exploration of different machine learning methods will be used to build predictive models using advanced classification and regression techniques. Natural language processing will explored along with neural networks and deep learning.
Prerequisite: MIS530 Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS560 - Advanced Data Analytics using R
Course Description
In this course students will explore advanced statistical analysis using R/RStudio. This course will prepare students for research, prevalent in many industries. Additionally, students will learn to use advanced R packages for deep learning methods, image classification and text classification. Finally, students will learn to use deep learning for natural language processing.
Prerequisite: MIS510 Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS581 - Capstone: Business Intelligence and Data Analytics
Course Description
This capstone course provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate competency on the key domains of business intelligence and data analytics. Students will learn to integrate concepts learned throughout the entire program and develop a comprehensive project in a specific domain of analytics, such as web analytics, social media analytics, big data analytics, or healthcare analytics. Prerequisite: All CORE courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MIS595 - Data Analytics Practicum
Course Description
This course is designed for students as an opportunity to demonstrate program outcomes learned in the Masters of Science in Data Analytics under the supervision of both faculty and organizational personnel. Assignments are designed to combine theory and professional practice and include weekly journals, a mid-term conference with the instructor, faculty practicum (coordinator, and on-site supervisor), as well as a final report reviewing the practicum experience. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite 3 Core Courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Marketing

 

MKG310 - Introduction to Marketing
Course Description
This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of marketing. Marketing principles and practices will be applied to marketing activities globally by analyzing real-world marketing issues. The application of marketing pricing, promotions, consumer behaviors, value delivery, and capture will be applied to daily global and domestic challenges while using current business tools to assess and communicate current marketing issues and challenges.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG330 - Consumer Behavior
Course Description
This course introduces students to marketing concepts and theories developed in economic and behavioral sciences. Students will apply buyer behavior concepts to marketing management decisions and develop analytical abilities when doing consumer research across buying platforms while assessing cultural, cognitive, and social factors.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG340 - Product and Brand Management
Course Description
This course provides an analysis of product and brand management as applied to goods and services. Students will be prepared to create value to targeted customers via ideation, planning/design, and implementation of successful product and brand development strategies. Brand elements will be analyzed for effectiveness.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG350 - Integrated Marketing, Promotions, and Advertising
Course Description
This course introduces the key elements of integrated marketing communications through the lens of advertising, marketing, and public relations. Topics include media relations, media buying, determining appropriate media, and publicity development tools. Students will also examine methods for improving customer satisfaction, relationship building strategies, and ethics in advertising.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG360 - Strategic Business-to-Business Sales
Course Description
This course addresses the complex and demanding responsibilities of business-to-business (B2B) sales. Topics include networking; negotiations; building relationships; understanding customer expectations and buyer behavior; personal branding and gatekeepers; ethics; and developing a technology-based sales plan. The basics of B2B sales from pre-prospecting through the purchase and follow-up steps are reviewed and compared to consumer selling. Additionally, the impact of digital marketing and technology on B2B sales will be analyzed. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG370 - Website and Content Marketing
Course Description
This course examines content marketing through the use of internet tools such as websites, search engines, mobile platforms and video/image based marketing. It further examines how popular website development tools are used to create engaging and interactive websites. Additionally, the course reviews search engine marketing (SEM) leading to search engine optimization (SEO) and pay-per-click advertising (PPC).
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG380 - Social Media Marketing
Course Description
This course provides the student with conceptual frameworks of how social media is strategically used in a marketing plan. It examines the use of popular social media platforms that include well-established platforms as well as emerging forms to include email marketing, mobile marketing, gaming, and location based mediums. Additionally, this course provides a basic understanding of how to measure the effectiveness of, and assess ethical issues associated with social media marketing.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG400 - International and Multi-Cultural Marketing
Course Description
This course provides a conceptual framework for marketing internationally using both traditional and digital marketing methods. Students explore development of international marketing programs, as well as the various macroenvironmental factors that affect decision-making in an international setting. Additionally, a multi-cultural view of marketing will look at differences across diverse consumer segments to influence future consumption. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG410 - Retail Marketing/Management
Course Description
This course provides a study of the principles and function of retailing and retail management. The course features analysis of various fundamental problems in retailing, location, and layout; merchandise planning; buying and selling organizations; expense analysis and control; and coordination of store activities. Additionally, this course provides a basic understanding of incorporating electronic marketing of goods/services such as strategies for using Internet to leverage marketing mix (product, price, place, & promotion) and current practices of online buying. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG420 - Digital Marketing
Course Description
This course provides the student with a theoretical and application-oriented understanding of the internet marketplace and its role in an overall marketing strategy. The course examines the vital daily functions a company performs with regards to digital marketing , to include email marketing, social media, mobile marketing, video marketing, the use of artificial intelligence in support of marketing efforts, disruptive innovative marketing platforms and digital advertising. Additionally the course provides a basic understanding of how to measure the effectiveness of and assess ethical issues associated with digital marketing. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG425 - Marketing Strategy for Small Business
Course Description
This course shall discuss the process for marketing small business products and services. The impact of digital marketing techniques on the small business’ effectiveness in marketing will be examined. Students shall analyze the different methods involved in building market share from the inception of a product or service through the consumer growth cycle as market share increases. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG430 - Market Research Through Digital Metrics and Analytics
Course Description
This course relates traditional market research concepts to the digital marketing platform through the use of SEM, SEO and PPC towards web optimization. The course reviews measurement and predictive analytics for marketers. Additionally, this course reviews Google analytics and Google Adwords in a marketing application.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG440 - Strategic Marketing
Course Description
This course provides students with advanced marketing theories and hands-on application of various new opinions in the marketing field. Students learn to formulate sales and marketing decisions while considering such factors as, consumer behavior/buying patterns, marketing variables, and global marketing issues from an integrated marketing communications perspective. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG470 - Marketing Research
Course Description
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to understand marketing research and apply best practices to marketing decision-making from both a consumer and a creator perspective. Topics such as the research process, marketing research in a global environment, and quantitative and qualitative research methods are covered. Students will also learn how statistics support analysis, and the role of social media in marketing research.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG480 - Capstone: Marketing Strategy and Execution
Course Description
This capstone course is designed to assess a student’s ability to demonstrate mastery of program content by applying skills, knowledge, and insight developed throughout the Marketing program. Students will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the CSU-Global Career Center and the resources it has to offer. Students will also learn how to develop a professional resume, online personal or professional profile, and a career plan. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG495 - Marketing Practicum
Course Description
This course is designed for students as an opportunity to demonstrate program outcomes learned in the B.S. in Marketing under the supervision of both faculty and organizational personnel. Assignments are designed to combine theory and professional practice and include weekly journals, a mid-term conference with the instructor, faculty practicum coordinator, and on-site supervisor, as well as a final report reviewing the practicum experience. This course may not be available in all States, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite: 3 core courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG501 - Strategic Marketing Management
Course Description
Students in this course will examine the strategic management, implementation, and oversight of marketing programs within an organization. A strong focus is placed on analyzing internal and external environments for controllable and uncontrollable market variables. Students will apply the marketing mix of place, price, promotions, and product to complex business decision-making while maximizing reach to the target market.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG502 - Product and Brand Management
Course Description
Students in this course will analyze the strategic implementation of brand and product management campaigns. Students will understand that the internal and external environment, as well as, the targeted customers are essential elements within the brand management process. Students will explore the planning, controlling, implementing, and measurement techniques needed to develop an effective marketing campaign for a brand.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG503 - Global Marketing Management
Course Description
Students in this course will examine international environments and the economic, cultural, political, and social dimensions that affect marketing considerations. Students will recommend marketing needs through the execution of research and advertising activities and supply chain analysis. Additionally, students will analyze the similarities and differences in marketing strategies used by companies entering international markets.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG521 - Advanced Marketing Analytics and Research
Course Description
Students in this course will examine various qualitative and quantitative tools and techniques to research markets through traditional and digital marketing methodologies. Students will analyze available consumer data through digital analytics focusing on relationships among factors, variables, and consumers. Students will examine how to use research and analytics to make strategic marketing decisions that positively impact organizational effectiveness.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG522 - Consumer Insights and Analysis
Course Description
Students in this course will focus on consumer insights by investigating internal and external influences that affect consumer purchase behavior. Students will examine both theoretical and research-based information to develop effective marketing strategies using the consumer decision-making process.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG531 - Creative Advertising and Communications
Course Description
Students in this course explore advertising and communication activities as part of the creation of an effective advertising campaign. Students will develop campaign components from ideation to implementation using media analysis and selection, copywriting, design fundamentals, and communication strategy.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG532 - Digital Storytelling
Course Description
Students in this course will develop and apply different digital storytelling elements to build brand awareness and stakeholder value. Students will focus on ways to differentiate a brand digitally through the use of various storytelling mediums. Additionally, students will manage a brand's online reputation and gain hands-on experience creating digital content for a brand using various storytelling components.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG541 - Strategic Internet Marketing
Course Description
Students in this course will explore companies, platforms, and technologies used in internet marketing environments. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the strategy development for online campaigns through theory and various software platforms to automate marketing tasks and gain consumer intelligence.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG542 - SEM and SEO Marketing
Course Description
Students in this course will examine the differences between search engine marketing (SEM) and search engine optimization (SEO). Students will analyze both SEM and SEO to determine how marketers can use these concepts to reach customers effectively. Additionally, students will employ various SEO tactics to develop marketing strategies and make SEM recommendations to maximize marketing results.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MKG581 - Marketing Capstone
Course Description
This course is a culminating experience of the student’s program learning and insight. Students will apply a variety of marketing strategies to activities and deliverables. Through the activities and deliverables, students will synthesize, integrate, and demonstrate marketing knowledge, skills, and abilities gained throughout the program.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Mathematics

 

MTH109 - Mathematical Explorations
Course Description
Students in this course explore quantitative problem solving presented through various mathematical concepts. Topics include deductive and inductive reasoning, logic, mathematical systems, and probability. Students will analyze interdisciplinary associations between mathematics and other program fields to better communicate relevance to the contemporary world. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education [Mathematics] requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course [GT-MA1] for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MTH122 - College Algebra
Course Description
Students in this course examine the concepts and techniques of college algebra and their uses in solving problems that arise in real world examples. This course contains a brief review of intermediate algebra, elementary functions including exponential and logarithmic, graphing of functions for mathematics, science, computer and business applications, equations and inequalities, and linear systems. The course will emphasize the development of problem-solving skills applicable to the real world rather than on memorization of formulas. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education [Mathematics] requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course [GT-MA1] for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MTH156 - Introduction to Statistics
Course Description
In MTH156: Introduction to Statistics, you will be provided with an introduction to data analysis, data production, and statistical inference. The assessments that you will complete throughout this course will focus on surveys and designed experiments, randomization, causation, regression, and inference using hypothesis tests. This course fulfills a general education Mathematics requirement. This is an approved Colorado gtPathways course. This is an approved Colorado gtPathways course. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MTH166 - Pre-Calculus
Course Description
In MTH166: Pre-calculus, you will cover pre-calculus topics within a personalized learning approach. The main topics that you will study include functions (polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric), analytic trigonometry, vectors, the complex plane, systems of equations, sequences and series, and analytic geometry. The assessments that you will complete in this course will include discussions, mastery exercises, and critical thinking assignments. This course fulfills a general education mathematics requirement. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MTH201 - Calculus I
Course Description
In MTH201: Calculus, you will cover foundational calculus topics with a personalized learning approach. Specifically, you will study topics that include limits, differentiation, applications of differentiation, and integration. The assessments that you will complete for this course include discussions, mastery exercises, and critical thinking assignments. This course fulfills a general education mathematics requirement. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MTH350 - Discrete Mathematics
Course Description
Students in this course receive an introduction to discrete math with a personalized learning approach designed for Information Technology or Cybersecurity. The main areas of study include combinatorics, sequences, sets, logic and proofs, and graph theory. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education [Mathematics] requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course [GT-MA1] for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MTH410 - Quantitative Business Analysis
Course Description
MTH410: Students in this course receive skills to analyze data and apply concepts of statistical analysis and research in a business context. Students formulate conclusions from data using descriptive and inferential statistical methods and expand on knowledge of the underlying theory behind types of data, data sources, data organization, measures of central tendency and variation, probability, and probability distributions. MTH156 is a recommended preparation course. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education [Mathematics] requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course [GT-MA1] for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MTH525 - Discrete Mathematics
Course Description
This graduate-level course will provide a rigorous introduction to discrete structures. The topics to be focused on are set theory, number theory, relations, graphs, and trees. Great emphasis will be focused on methods of mathematical proof: direct proof, induction, contradiction.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MTH530 - Foundation and Applications of Analysis I
Course Description
Foundation and Applications of Analysis I is a graduate-level course that will provide you with an applied review of analysis principles and implications. You will apply differential and integral calculus, differential equations and analysis of complex variables. In this course, you will cover the first half of the traditional graduate-level Calculus sequence, selected Linear algebra and differential equations concepts. Previous undergraduate coursework (at least 12-credits of undergraduate Calculus) is recommended for success in this course. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

MTH531 - Foundation and Applications of Analysis II
Course Description
This graduate-level course provides an overview of analysis principles and implications. The topics covered by this extended course range from higher order differential and integral calculus, to Fourier transforms, partial differential equations and analysis of complex variables. Previous undergraduate coursework (at least 12 credits of undergraduate Calculus) is assumed.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MTH540 - Higher Geometry
Course Description
This graduate-level course covers the foundations of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries (geometry of Lobachevski/ Hyperbolic geometry, Spherical geometry). The course also includes a historical study of parallel postulate and discussion of the study of Axiomatic systems.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MTH545 - Mathematical Modeling
Course Description
Mathematical Modeling is a graduate-level course in which you will cover several advanced techniques in mathematical modeling. You will focus primarily on simulation using Excel. You will apply these techniques to situations involving exponential growth, compound interest, combat models and disease spread. Previous undergraduate coursework (at least 21-credits of undergraduate mathematics) is recommended for success in this course.
Credit Hours: 3

 

MTH556 - Advanced Probability and Statistics
Course Description
This graduate-level course will introduce students to a wide range of probability and statistical concepts, with a foundation in calculus. The topics range across probability plots, probability density functions, and point estimates. Students will gain understanding and skills that go well beyond basic undergraduate statistics courses.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Online Teaching and Learning

 

OTL502 - Learning Theories and Models of Instruction
Course Description
This course focuses on the examination of learning theories and models of instruction. A variety of theoretical constructs are studied to address diverse learning needs and conceptual frameworks for engaging learners. Students will explore theoretical perspectives on learning, cognition, and cognitive development. By examining a range of principles, perspectives and tools, students will gain an understanding of learning and teaching in a variety of contexts. Students will use problem solving, application, and evaluation skills to analyze the theories and practices of educational organizations.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL504 - Social, Ethical, and Legal Issues in 21st Century Learning
Course Description
This course provides educators with an overview of the legal, ethical, and social issues that are unique in the 21st century learning environment. Topics such as learner privacy online, the appropriate uses of newer technologies, copyright, and intellectual property on the Internet will be presented. Students will also examine privacy law and contemporary legal issues of the 21st century classrooms.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL505 - Educational Systems and Change
Course Description
This course equips students with the skills to navigate the dynamic landscape of education. Participants will learn to design data-informed strategies for impactful change and develop their unique profiles as teacher leaders. The curriculum provides insight into the profound influence of global trends, including technology, diversity, and globalization, on educational practices. A significant emphasis is placed on understanding and evaluating the implications of regulations in the education sector.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL510 - Teacher Leadership
Course Description
This course empowers teachers with the tools and insights necessary for impactful leadership in diverse learning environments. Participants will hone in on identifying essential leadership traits and master the art of fostering meaningful collaborations with stakeholders. Through a blend of theory and practice, students will learn to navigate and optimize leadership opportunities while crafting instruments to elevate teacher leadership. A significant emphasis of the course lies in analyzing leadership perceptions within learning settings and devising strategies to address and mitigate organizational challenges.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL515 - Teacher as an Instructional Change Agent
Course Description
This course focuses on the teacher leader as an instructional change agent, in a role typically referred to as instructional coach. This course investigates the change process from the coach’s perspective. Whether working with one client or team of teachers, the position of instructional coach requires knowledge of change processes, curriculum content, professional learning standards, and barriers that inhibit change. From analyzing data to conducting coaching conversations, students explore the many duties of the instructional coach.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL520 - Adult Learning: Theory and Practice
Course Description
This course introduces students to a diverse collection of adult learning theories that include both eastern and western perspectives. Students will examine both the contextual factors and cognitive structures that affect learning in adulthood as well as determine the unique needs of adult learners. Students will apply adult learning theory and integrate evidence-based instructional strategies into learning experiences.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL531 - Models of Instructional Delivery
Course Description
This course explores contemporary instructional models and methods linking education with workforce alignment, which facilitate effective teaching and learning. Multiple learning platforms and learning scenarios are studied, including e-learning in training and development. The instructional design models in this course are viewed from an international/global perspective.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL538 - 21st Century Teaching and Learning
Course Description
This course introduces new ways to develop and deliver engaging curriculum, relevant for today's student and teacher. Teaching the commonalities among learning management systems (LMS), learners work with a wide variety of Web tools that can be used to supplement and create content for their courses. Finally, students address the ever-important topic of copyright law, fair use, and creative commons to teach students in virtual classrooms how to use content responsibly and legally. This is an interactive course where students create and compile a working portfolio of tools, tips, and tricks to use right away in the online courses they are teaching. This course is a replacement course for OTL538k as of the 2017-2018 Fall trimester. Students cannot receive credit for both of these courses.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL539 - Theory and Practice in Backward Design
Course Description
This course delves into the foundational elements of instructional design, focusing on the integration of learning theories and the application of the Backward Design framework. Participants will master the principles of Backward Design, ensuring that instruction is purposefully structured around desired learning outcomes. Emphasis will be placed on the identification and application of research-based strategies to promote inclusivity in instructional design, ensuring diverse learners' needs are met. Throughout the course, students will engage in the comprehensive instructional design process, culminating in the development of effective instructional materials.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL540 - Instructional Theory and Design Principles
Course Description
This course explores the intricacies of instructional design, emphasizing its application in professional contexts. Participants will integrate key adult learning theories, understanding their pivotal role in the design process. Through a learner-centric lens, students will master the design of strategies tailored to distinct learner motivations, goals, culture, and experiences. Practical applications of these theories and principles will be examined, enabling students to effectively align instruction with specific business needs and evaluate learning units for efficacy and alignment with established adult learning paradigms.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL541 - Assessment and Evaluation in Learning and Performance
Course Description
This course focuses on the role of assessment and evaluation in instructional design. Students will learn various techniques for measuring learning and program effectiveness in digital settings. Students will examine ethical and legal considerations and implications related to digital, mobile and social technology environments. Students will collect and analyze learner data to provide effective feedback in online learning contexts to facilitate growth in learning and performance.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL542 - Learning Technologies
Course Description
This course examines the evolution and significance of e-learning in the 21st century. Participants will gain hands-on experience with online learning technologies and engage in discussions about the most prevalent technologies currently used in P-20 education. Through a comprehensive approach, the course will guide students in assessing the specific technology learning needs pertinent to various educational settings, ensuring they are equipped to make informed decisions and implementations in their respective roles.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL544 - Leading the Learning Strategy
Course Description
This course addresses the critical leadership competencies for those who play a role in the design, execution, and evaluation of a learning function. Students will analyze the key aspects that influence today's learners including business drivers, a diverse global workforce, and technology.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL545 - Technology and Innovation
Course Description
This course examines how present and emerging technologies are transforming society and schools and the implications these changes have for teaching and learning. Strategies for building students' critical thinking habits, innovation, and creativity with respect to new technologies and media will be developed in the context of 21st century literacies (information, visual, etc.). Students will explore the practical context for the use of technology and will develop skills that identify and address the challenge of using technology creatively in teaching and learning situations today.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL547 - Evaluation and Assessment
Course Description
This course offers an in-depth exploration into the intricacies of assessment frameworks and their role in the learning process. Students will critically evaluate various assessment frameworks, pinpointing the essential components that make an assessment tool effective and reliable. The course emphasizes the importance of feedback, providing strategies to enhance learning outcomes through timely and constructive critiques. Using real-world learner data, participants will hone their skills in data analysis, ensuring instruction is responsive and tailored to learners' needs. Lastly, students will delve into the best methods to visually represent assessment data, enabling clear communication of results to diverse stakeholders.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL560 - Facilitating Learning and Transfer
Course Description
This course provides educators with the knowledge and skills to effectively implement learning transfer in K-12 settings. Participants will learn to apply core theories that enhance the transferability of learning, recognize and address the challenges that hinder this process, and appreciate the multifaceted components that contribute to successful learning transfer. The curriculum also provides hands-on opportunities to craft lessons that are firmly grounded in learning transfer principles, ensuring educators are well-prepared to facilitate impactful learning experiences.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL565 - Cultural Responsiveness in the Differentiated Classroom
Course Description
This course offers a comprehensive look into the learning theories and models that cater to culturally and linguistically diverse learners. Students will critically examine how socio-emotional factors, including cultural background and language barriers, can deeply influence the learning trajectory. Participants will learn to seamlessly integrate strategies into their teaching, ensuring that diverse learner needs are met effectively. The course culminates in a synthesis of various learning theories and models, empowering students to pinpoint and apply strategies that bolster cultural responsiveness in educational settings.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL568 - Action Research
Course Description
This course offers an advanced examination of the educator-led action research approach, specifically tailored for instructional improvement and enhanced student learning. Participants will explore the foundational processes of action research, getting acquainted with its unique design approaches and methodologies. A core focus lies in understanding the intricacies of data collection and analysis within this context. Learners gain skills in interpreting findings from action research studies and will be equipped to craft their own data-driven plans for educational enhancement.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL579 - Capstone: Research-Based Professional Project
Course Description
This research-based course is an opportunity for students to integrate and synthesize their learning across the program curriculum and demonstrate the skills needed to be an effective educator in today's global community. The culminating professional project will be framed around nationally recognized educator effectiveness knowledge, skills, and standards that can be of strategic benefit to a professional or educational organization. Prerequisite: All core and specialization courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

OTL581 - Capstone: Researching Effective Educational Programming
Course Description
This capstone course brings together the knowledge and skills needed to define and research an educational problem or professional practice. Students utilize data, strategy, research skills, analytical tools, theoretical models, and decision sciences in this research project that can be of strategic benefit to a professional or educational organization.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Operations Management

 

OPS400 - Fundamentals of Operations Management
Course Description
This course provides students with an understanding of process strategy, quality improvement, and the tools utilized in the production of goods and services. Students learn concepts regarding operations, quality, and process management, and evaluate how these concepts can be used to gain a competitive advantage in the industry. Students also learn how mathematical models are used to assist in making decisions in regard to operations, inventory, quality, and materials requirements.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OPS402 - Financial Performance in Operations Management
Course Description
In this course, students are prepared to understand the role of financial performance in the management of a company’s processes and services and its influence on an enterprise’s financial viability. The course will focus on the integration of operations management and financial management as well as on the reasons why asset management is an essential organizational process and the benefits of ISO 9000. Additionally, the concepts of net present value, internal rate of return and other cost effectiveness indicators, and a general approach to the international standards for organizations are reviewed. Students will review each topic in the context of their own workplace as well as across different organizations and industries and throughout the global environment.  
Credit Hours: 3

 

OPS404 - Leadership in Operations Management
Course Description
This course focuses on the leadership and supervisory roles and responsibilities of a manager in the context of operations management. Topics include leadership, human capital, labor relationships, work environment, diversification, and workplace culture within the context of students own workplace, as well as across different organizations and industries in the global environment.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OPS405 - Managing the Supply Chain
Course Description
This course provides the student with an examination of the concept and design of supply chains for manufacturing and service organizations. Specific emphasis is placed on the management of those supply chains, including management of purchasing, contracting, costing, working with vendors, and working with customers. Students analyze the innovative capabilities of effectively managed supply chains and the overall effect those supply chains can have on the bottom line for an organization.
Credit Hours: 3

 

OPS510 - Operations Management
Course Description
This course helps students develop an understanding of the various functions and responsibilities of the operations department in regards to today's competitive environment and market demands. The course examines quality management, the design and production of goods and services, effective supply chains and virtual chains, product life cycles, and the design and management of processes to develop and improve production and resource planning. Students analyze tools that make manufacturing, planning, and logistics of different supply chain strategies, including forecasting, system design, quality, supply chain management, and inventory management.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Organizational Leadership

 

ORG100 - Personal Leadership and Academic Success
Course Description
Students receive an introduction to personal leadership, leadership influence, and academic expectations. Students will define components of effective personal leadership as well as examine current and proven approaches for excellence in leading. Students will also integrate college-level critical thinking, research, communication, and interpersonal skills.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG300 - Applying Leadership Principles
Course Description
The opportunities for students, in this first course, for all majors are to learn personal and professional leadership styles and drivers by providing an overview of leadership basics. Leadership skills are utilized across fields of study. Regardless of the roles individuals assume in an organization, they will need to communicate effectively, influence others, and understand the way they respond to others and why. The course engages students in discussion, exploration, and application of leadership skills, principles, and practices. Students will learn about the relationships and connections leaders have with individuals and organizations. Topics include leadership communication, motivation, style, and characteristics. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG301 - Leading Organizational Behavior
Course Description
Students conduct a broad analysis of individual and group behavior in organizations. Students learn how organizations are led effectively and through quality of employees work life. Topics include job design, organizational structure and design, decision-making, power, rewards, stress, organizational change, and group/individual behavior. Topics are covered with both leadership theory and application.
Prerequisite: ORG300 Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG305 - Entrepreneurship in the Global Age
Course Description
A study of the role of the entrepreneur in starting and growing businesses and developing new products and services in today's economy. Analysis of the conditions in which entrepreneurs utilize their creativity and innovation to meet consumer demands in diverse markets.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG400 - Leading Teams in Organizations
Course Description
Students examine the development, organization and leadership of teams in both traditional and virtual settings, while also considering the impact globalization has on the importance of effective team participation and leadership. This course is designed to facilitate skill development and a working knowledge of and experience in team creation, leading teams, and individual roles within the team. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG405 - Principles and Practices of Effective Leadership
Course Description
Students explore the various aspects of leadership. Students learn concepts such as leadership styles, effective leadership, diversity, and frameworks for motivating and influencing groups and individuals within organizations. Additionally, students will practice problem solving and crisis decision making through simulation. Prerequisite: ORG300.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG420 - Leading Organizational Change
Course Description
Students analyze the role of leadership when planning and implementing change within contemporary organizations. There is an emphasis on how leaders strategize, direct, and assess organizational need for change and develop accomplished through shared vision and decision-making. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG423 - Communication Strategies for Leaders
Course Description
Students gain a practical review of leadership communication strategies for transmitting, receiving, and understanding information in the workplace. Emphasis is on equipping leaders with the knowledge of how to overcome communication barriers by utilizing appropriate strategies and methods, including effective ways to provide feedback. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG429 - Ethics and Law in Organizations
Course Description
Students in this course examine legalities and ethics in the workplace and the role organizational leaders adopt in ethical behavior. Students will learn the basic frameworks of ethical transactions and legalities in organizational leadership. Students will establish a proficiency in critical thinking skills to identify and answer ethical and legal issues normally encountered in organizations. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG430 - Vision and Transformation: Leading Forward
Course Description
In this course, students will examine how leaders use information and intuition to transform and drive organizations towards the future. Knowing how to develop a vision, make incremental advances, support innovation in the organizational culture, and influence across organizational hierarchies are crucial to leading forward. Learning practical skills to cultivate innovators in the organization is an expectation of learning in this course.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG470 - Leading Through Conflict Resolution
Course Description
Students identify and analyze leadership strategies for dealing with both functional and dysfunctional conflict in organizations. Included is a study of conflict resolution approaches, including avoidance, accommodation, collaboration, competing, and compromising. Through theory and application, students will learn to use conflict resolution skills, immediately, in a practical way.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG480 - Capstone: Organizational Leadership
Course Description
This capstone course provides students the opportunity to understand, observe, and facilitate organizational efforts toward problem solving and social change within an organization. Students will demonstrate what they have learned throughout their organizational leadership program and apply it in real world situations, developing a plan to deal with a significant organizational problem. The student will create one major plan to address the problem in detail. Prerequisite: All core and specialization courses.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG495 - Organizational Leadership Practicum
Course Description
The practicum provides students with practical experience in organizations specific to their fields. Each student will work under the direct supervision of a senior-level professional at an approved organization or company. The purpose of the practicum is for students to apply and integrate what they have learned during the core courses of their programs. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite 3 Core Courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG502 - Effective Organizations: Theory and Practice
Course Description
In this course, students gain an understanding of leading operational and strategic issues in public and private organizations facing accelerated social, economic, and technological changes. Students will examine organizational theory, strategic thinking, and theories guiding decisionmaking, leadership, organizational culture, and change management.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG515 - Leadership Power in Organizations
Course Description
In this course, evolving leaders will identify sources of power and influence in organizations. Leaders examine the role of leadership in building relationships related to power issues encountered in organizations and consider the positive and negative outcomes of the influence of power from the perspectives of leaders and team members.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG521 - Organizational Change and Forecasting
Course Description
In this course, evolving leaders will examine the factors and theories of effective change leadership. Students learn strategies, structures, and techniques for facilitating organizational change for competitive success in today's vibrant organizations. Students will examine the need for organizational data use when forecasting and planning organizational change.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG525 - Decision Theory in a Global Marketplace
Course Description
In this course, students will analyze the roles of leaders and managers in decision making. In the context of organizational theories of behavior and leadership, students consider how decision and choice theory are applied in global organizational settings. Students also learn to apply practical problem solving and conflict management skills through decision-making tools and leadership approaches.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG530 - Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility
Course Description
In this course, students explore the ethical considerations that guide and inform business decisions and strategies. Students learn the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) to understand and apply ethics from social, economic, and environmental perspectives.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG536 - Contemporary Business Writing and Communication
Course Description
This course is designed for the practicing professional and focuses on internal and external communications practices and strategies within and beyond organizational settings. Audience is considered and includes employees, executives, first-line supervisors, community, customers, and board members. Students consider communication styles, interpersonal skills, business and professional writing, reports, and presentations based on substantive and credible data, and various modes of communication, including virtual communication.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG550 - Executives in Organizations
Course Description
In this course, evolving leaders will examine executive leadership in organizations. The course identifies executive competencies that are beneficial to long-term organizational success. Topics explored include executive communication, developing organizational culture, problem-solving, acquiring and promoting of key personnel, leading innovation and thinking globally; flexibility and resilience; and your future in executive leadership. Topics will be explored through conceptual and practical lenses.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG555 - Leading Diverse Teams
Course Description
In this course, students gain a comprehensive understanding of diversity as it applies to strategic planning, cultural change, and team dynamics. Students learn to identify the realities of developing and implementing diversity initiatives for the organization and the workforce, as well as explore emerging issues in organizational leadership.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG561 - Examination of Modern Leadership
Course Description
In this course, students learn the skills and insights to be effective leaders and contributors in the creation and evolution of successful organizations. Students examine relevant readings, case studies, and research to analyze today’s successful companies. Additionally, students determine key factors involved in sustaining organizations.
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG575 - Critical Evaluation of Research and Theory
Course Description
In this course, students learn to evaluate research and theory through the lens of organizational leadership. Students gain a comprehensive knowledge of research related to an organizational or industry problem or opportunity of their choosing. Topics include the research process, theoretical frameworks, qualitative and quantitative approaches, and applied research design within an organizational context. Prerequisite: All Core and Specialization courses except for Capstone. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG579 - Capstone: Organizational Leadership
Course Description
In this course, students will integrate and synthesize their learning from the core courses in the organizational leadership program. Students will reflect on the skills needed to be an effective organizational leader in today's global workplace. Through the course activities, students will also demonstrate their knowledge and skills in how to lead organizations through complex changes in a global society. Prerequisite: All Core and Specialization courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

ORG595 - Organizational Leadership Practicum / Internship
Course Description
In this course, students participate on the staff of an organizational leadership or related professional team under the co-supervision of faculty and agency personnel. Weekly journals and a mid-term report are required and combine theory and observation of professional practice. Other course requirements include a mid-term conference with the faculty internship coordinator and evaluation of the on-site supervisor. On-site hours are determined by credit hours. Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete three courses (nine credits) prior to taking the Internship. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite 3 Core Courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Physics

 

PHY101 - Introduction to Physics with Lab
Course Description
PHY101 is an introductory course in classical Newtonian physics. In this course, students study the scientific method, measuring the fundamental characteristics of length and mass, scalars and vectors, acceleration and gravity, Newton’s laws of motion, Kepler’s laws of planetary motion, potential and kinetic energy, momentum, fluids, temperature, and heat, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Students apply this knowledge through critical thinking assignments and laboratory experiments. 
Credit Hours: 4

 

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Political Science

 

POL101 - Introduction to Political Science
Course Description
This survey course explores the nature of politics, political environments and culture, the organization of political activities, and various political systems. Special emphasis is placed upon three levels of politics: the individual, the state, and international community. The political systems and activities of many nations, past and present, will be explored. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course (GT-SS1) for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

POL500 - U.S. Foreign Policy
Course Description
This graduate-level course explores the realm of US Foreign Policy within the broader context of global politics. Students will explore the historical evolution, theoretical frameworks, and contemporary dynamics that shape America's interactions on the global stage.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Project Management

 

PJM310 - Introduction to Project Management
Course Description
This course provides the student with a high-level overview of project management. Student will cover project management techniques such as project selection, management, organization, planning, conflict, negotiation, budgeting, scheduling, control of the project, and termination of the project. Students cannot receive credit for both PJM310 and MGT410. Recommended Prior Courses: ORG300 and MGT300.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM330 - Effective Project Scheduling and Control
Course Description
This course explores project scheduling, monitoring, and controlling techniques used by successful project managers. Students assume the role of project manager in a 7-week, web-based simulation and apply the concepts conveyed in the course to a complex project. Through this experience, the course intends to develop the students’ competency in the following areas: project planning, scope definition and control, cost estimation, cost control, scheduling, controlling, trade-off decision-making, learning-curve theory, quality management, and communication management. Prerequisite: PJM310.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM350 - Construction Project Management
Course Description
This course intends to teach key aspects of construction project management, including the theory, methods and quantitative tools used to effectively plan, organize, and control construction projects; efficient management methods revealed through practice and research; and practical project management knowledge from on-site situations. To achieve this objective, the course provides a basic project management framework in which the project lifecycle is broken down into key phases. Within this framework, students will learn the key processes and tools necessary to manage construction projects. By the end of the term, students will be able to adapt and apply the framework to effectively manage a construction project in an Architecture/ Engineering/ Construction (A/E/C) firm. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM380 - Project Management Tools
Course Description
This course will introduce students to the use of project management tools and software to plan, design, and facilitate effective initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, controlling, and closing projects. While students could use a variety of software packages or combination of software, they need to assess a variety of custom tools. Case studies are used throughout this course because the goal is to give students as much of a real-world feel as is possible. In addition to learning best practices in project management, students will have the option to use either Microsoft Project or a combination of other MS Office tools to complete numerous assignments, culminating in the final portfolio project. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to plan and manage a project using appropriate software applications. Prerequisite: PJM310. Recommended Prior Course: PJM330.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM400 - Project Procurement and Contract Management
Course Description
This course examines the procurement-management knowledge aspect of project management. A critical component is obtaining the appropriate resources from external and internal vendors, which is the responsibility of the project manager. Students will learn the process of acquiring external resources through vendors and the legal requirements associated with contracts. Students will have an opportunity to study best practices regarding contract management and purchasing within a project management environment. Prerequisite: PJM310. Recommended Prior Course: PJM380.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM405 - Fundamentals of Agile Methodologies
Course Description
In this course, students learn the agile project management framework. The course contrasts agile and waterfall methodologies and discusses where Agile is most applicable and useful as a project management methodology. Recommended Prior Course: PJM310 or MGT410.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM410 - Assessing and Managing Risk
Course Description
This course equips students with the skills necessary to manage project risk. Students learn how various components of a project risk management plan including planning, risk identification, qualitative risk assessment, quantitative risk assessment, risk response planning, risk response implementation, and risk monitoring.  Prerequisite: PJM310. Recommended Prior Course: PJM400.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM440 - Project Quality Management
Course Description
This course introduces the concepts and benefits of having a systematic approach to project quality management. It examines the main considerations necessary to plan, manage, and control quality in project environments. Prerequisite: PJM310. Recommended Prior Course: PJM380.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM460 - Project Leadership
Course Description
This course explores the intersection of the leadership and project management bodies of knowledge, with a focus on how project managers can leverage an understanding of leadership to enhance project success. Students study facilitation, negotiation, teamwork, communication, presentation, interpersonal, and conflict management skills, with specific attention to project management applicability. Recommended Prior Course: PJM310.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM480 - Capstone: Project Management
Course Description
The capstone course allows students to develop a project management plan for a project of their choice. Students learn how project selection techniques are applied and will utilize skills gained throughout their project management studies to demonstrate the ability to thoroughly plan a project. They define project objectives in relation to cost, schedule, and quality and develop the project scope. The proposed plan will address strategies for overcoming challenges, including a risk management plan, policies related to ethics and professional code of conduct, and leadership strategy. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all core coursework.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM495 - Project Management Practicum
Course Description
This course is designed for students who participate in a project management capacity on the staff of an organization that manages and implements projects. It serves as an opportunity to demonstrate program outcomes learned in the B.S. in Project Management under the supervision of both faculty and organization personnel. Assignments include weekly journals; a mid-term conference with the instructor, faculty practicum coordinator, and on-site supervisor; and a final report. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite: 3 core courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM500 - Project Management
Course Description
This course introduces the tasks and challenges fundamental to project management. Topics include how to manage teams, schedules, risks, and resources to effectively achieve project objectives from time, cost, and quality perspectives. Case studies are incorporated into the course, allowing students to apply knowledge and skills associated with negotiating, selecting, initiating, planning, budgeting, scheduling, monitoring, controlling, and terminating a project. The implications of managing projects in an international setting are also assessed and ethical principles in managing projects are evaluated in this course. Recommended Prior Course: ORG502 and OPS510.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM525 - Business Analysis
Course Description
This course emphasizes assessing and integrating project requirements in relation to user needs and organizational goals. Topics include requirements gathering, business analysis, and project planning. Case studies allow students to apply knowledge and skills associated with analyzing business situations, developing requirements, and translating user needs into technology and engineering specifications for development teams. Prerequisite: PJM500
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM530 - Contracts, Procurement, and Risk Management
Course Description
This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of the procurement-and risk- management processes in projects. The course also helps students evaluate and synthesize concepts within the domains of contract management and risk management, and helps students identify and assess recommended practices in contract management and purchasing. Topics primarily include risk-management planning, risk identification, risk analysis, risk-response strategies, risk monitoring, and risk control. In addition, the course covers the project manager's responsibilities in identifying and obtaining resources from vendors, as well as the legal requirements and contracting processes involved. Prerequisite: PJM500.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM535 - Project Metrics, Monitoring, and Control
Course Description
Selecting, evaluating, and communicating performance metrics plays a critical role in successful monitoring and control of projects. This course provides an in-depth discussion of project management metrics and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), and it explores related topics such as value-based project management metrics, dashboards, and measurement-driven project management. The course discusses the role of metrics in effective monitoring and control of projects, and provides an overview of the most important considerations in proper use and communication of project performance metrics. Prerequisite: PJM500.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM540 - Agile Project Management
Course Description
In this course, students examine the agile approach to project management. Project managers increasingly use the agile approach and utilize a Scrum framework for complex and team-centric projects. This course focused on the fundamental and practical aspects of the agile approach, highlighting the value of customer focused adaptive planning, and collaborative effort. Using course content, case studies and examples, this course teaches students practical industry-standard tools and techniques that will lead to better decision-making, and desirable project outcomes using the agile methodology. Prerequisite: PJM500. Recommended Prior Course: PJM560.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM560 - Project Management Office (PMO)
Course Description
Project-based organizations around the globe are defining, borrowing, and collecting best practices in the process of project management and are increasingly assigning the PMO to exert overall influence and evolution of thought to continual organizational improvement. This course emphasizes the Project Management Office (PMO). Students will learn the elements of a PMO, which includes defining and maintaining standards, policies, processes, and methods for project management within the organization. PMOs govern the management of projects and report on project activities, problems, and requirements to executive management as a strategic tool in keeping implementers and decision-makers moving toward consistent, business- or mission-focused goals and objectives. PJM500 and PJM535 are recommended
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM580 - Capstone: Project Management
Course Description
The capstone course allows students to develop a plan for a major project in a business of choice. Students will be required to analyze project objectives in relationship to budget, schedule, and scope to propose a project with a full plan of implementation. The proposed plan must address strategies for overcoming challenges faced by similar projects. Students will utilize skills gained throughout the program to demonstrate the ability to plan and implement a project from conception to conclusion. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all core and specialization coursework.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PJM595 - Project Management Practicum
Course Description
In this course, students participate on the staff of a project management or related professional team under the cosupervision of faculty and agency personnel. Weekly journals and a mid-term report are required and combine theory and observation of professional practice. Other course requirements include a mid-term conference with the faculty internship coordinator and evaluation of the on-site supervisor. On-site hours are determined by credit hours. Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete three courses (nine credits) prior to taking the internship. This course may not be available in all states, see the State Specific Authorization Policy under Admissions Policies. Prerequisite 3 Core Courses. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Psychology

 

PSY100 - General Psychology
Course Description
Students successfully completing the course will demonstrate an understanding of the field of psychology including learning, perception, motivation, emotion, heredity, personality, development, abnormal and psycho-therapy. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY235 - Human Growth and Development
Course Description
This course is designed to provide the student with a broad overview of human development, particularly changes in an individual's physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development across the lifespan. Students will be introduced to developmental theories and examine the developmental tasks and challenges unique to each type of development process. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course (GT-SS3) for Colorado and surrounding states. This course fulfills the human growth and development nursing requirement. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY510 - History, Systems, and Philosophy of Military and Emergency Responder Psychology
Course Description
This course highlights the current psychosocial research and literature relevant to the mental health of military and responder populations, including influences of culture, age, and stigma on utilization of mental health services. Students will examine the personal, social, cultural and organizational forces that affect the psychology of military and responder populations.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY515 - Ethics in Practice
Course Description
This course will focus in-depth on ethical standards applicable to the science and practice of psychology and pertinent laws and legal standards governing the practice of psychology. Special consideration will be given to topics such as peer support vs. clinician limits of confidentiality, establishing clinical boundaries, avoiding dual relationships, and the importance of establishing and maintaining cultural competence.
Prerequisite: RES510 Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY520 - Lifespan Development and Generational Issues
Course Description
This course is designed to familiarize students with major concepts, theories, and research related to normal lifespan development (infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood). Additionally, students will focus on impactful generational experiences and cultural norms that may reflect how individuals function in the world and in the workplace. Rank structure in the military and in police and fire agencies often leads to conflicts related to generational norms and ensuring that those providing mental health support services to these populations can understand, appreciate, and articulate the link between rank and generational experiences is essential.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY525 - Suicide Prevention and Intervention
Course Description
Suicide is a serious public health issue and challenge in Colorado and across the nation. While clinicians across subfields of psychology focused to some extent on the assessment and treatment of people at high risk for suicide, a more comprehensive approach is needed to understand this issue as it relates to military and first responder cultures. Specifically, what prevents them from seeking help how to have a meaningful dialogue about suicidality in a way that is culturally sensitive. This course covers best practices in suicide prevention, intervention and suicide crisis response as it relates to military and emergency responder personnel.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY530 - Couples and Family Counseling
Course Description
This course is designed for students who want to develop a specialty in working with families and couples. Theoretical perspectives utilized include general systems theory and an integration of behavioral, experiential, and family therapy approaches. Research from the Gottman Institute, which has systematically identified consistent sequences that differentiate relationship success vs failure is heavily emphasized. 
Prerequisite: PSY510 Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY535 - Trauma and Crisis Intervention
Course Description
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the key issues associated with trauma and crisis intervention, including how to conceptualize trauma and different approaches to treatment. Specifically, this course focuses on assessing and responding to crises, conducting rapid needs assessment in complex emergencies, and utilizing psychological first aid, debriefing, and defusing skills in a variety of contexts. Course content will also assist students in preventing and healing from their own experiences of secondary and vicarious trauma.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY540 - Individual Counseling Techniques and Theory
Course Description
This course is designed to introduce students to the practice of psychotherapy. Students will explore basic theories and techniques of counseling, with an emphasis on the therapy relationship. Specifically, students will learn foundational theories, clinical interventions, how to evaluate progress in therapy, and how to constructively confront clients. In addition, students will explore cultural considerations for working with first responder and military populations as well as how to take care of themselves, identify vicarious trauma and prevent burnout. 
Prerequisite: PSY515 Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY545 - Group Interventions
Course Description
This course exposes students to basic elements of the group intervention process, ethical and professional issues unique to group work, and key concepts and techniques of group therapy/intervention. Specific learning objectives include attaining an understanding of the theory and functioning of groups; gaining knowledge and practice in essential group therapy skills; identifying integral points and considerations for working with military and responder populations; and developing an awareness of one's own impact on group contexts. 
Prerequisite: PSY515 Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY550 - Performance and Health Psychology
Course Description
This course will focus on the ways that clients' physical health and stress affects psychosocial and emotional well-being. Course work will focus on the relationship between the mind and the body and take a holistic and contextual approach to understanding work with clients, keeping in mind relational and cultural variables. Additionally, discussions will focus on mindfulness, differential diagnoses of depression and anxiety, sleep hygiene, and other empirically supported treatments for issues that clients routinely present with. The overarching theoretical framework of the course will be relationship-focused, client-centered, and strengths-based. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY551 - Statistics
Course Description
This course is designed to increase understanding of advanced analytical techniques in statistics, particularly as they pertain to psychology. Course material will take an applied approach, i.e., the course material will emphasize the feasibility, application, and utilization of these analyses rather than the theories upon which they are based. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY555 - Military and Emergency Responder Assessment (Pre-Employment, Fitness for Duty, and Return to Duty Evaluations)
Course Description
This course addresses the cultural considerations needed for interviewing and conducting psychological evaluations with military and responder personnel. Clinical interviewing techniques and measures across all psychological assessment domains, including diagnosis, personality, and cognition, as well as more specialty-focused areas such as pre-employment, return-to-duty, and fitness-for-duty evaluations are covered. The class explores the strengths and limitations of each assessment measure with a focus on research and norming issues as well as administration and feedback considerations. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY560 - Substance Abuse
Course Description
This course will provide an introduction to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of substance abuse and related disorders. Additionally, students will become familiar with the dynamics and etiology of substance abuse; learn to identify psychometric tools used in the evaluation of substance abuse; and be able to review evidence-based treatment methods and their application to military and emergency responder populations.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY565 - Grief and Loss
Course Description
The course provides a review of the present status of the psychology of loss and grief including trauma related loss. Students will review applicable literature and a model for dealing with grief and loss in individual and group settings will be discussed. Diverse cultural differences in addressing grief and loss will be covered as well as multicultural interventions to address the needs of those who have experienced grief and loss.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY570 - Counseling Practicum I
Course Description
The clinical practicum is an online-directed, supervised field experience in a mental health counseling field setting during which students practice specific clinical skills, including interviewing, assessment, intervention, documentation, and consultation. Students use fundamental communication and interviewing principles and perform initial assessments with individuals, couples, and/or families. This course, considered Part 1 of a two-part practicum experience, requires 50 hours of clinical field experience, which must consist of no less than 20 hours of direct client contact, and no less than 6 hours of face-to-face contact with field supervisors. Students also meet weekly via web conferencing for synchronous group supervision meetings with their course instructor. Students are responsible to research and comply with the specific clinical experience requirements of their states.
Prerequisite: PSY510 PSY515 Credit Hours: 2

 

PSY571 - Counseling Practicum II
Course Description
The clinical practicum is an online-directed, supervised field experience in a mental health counseling field setting during which students practice specific clinical skills, including interviewing, assessment, intervention, documentation, and consultation. Students use fundamental communication and interviewing principles and perform initial assessments with individuals, couples, and/or families. This course, considered Part 2 of a two-part practicum experience, requires 50 hours of clinical field experience, which must consist of no less than 20 hours of direct client contact, and no less than 6 hours of face-to-face contact with field supervisors. Students also meet weekly via web conferencing for synchronous group supervision meetings with their course instructor. Students are responsible to research and comply with the specific clinical experience requirements of their states.  
Credit Hours: 2

 

PSY575 - Facilitating Career Counseling
Course Description
Students will learn techniques for assessment of career aptitudes, interests, values, and personality.  Attention will also be given to career theories and techniques for facilitating career development. Relationships between lifestyle, workplace, and career planning will be explored.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY580 - Counseling Internship 1
Course Description
This is the first course in a sequence of four clinical internship courses during which students fulfill 600 total required contact hours in a mental health counseling setting. Students are responsible for securing their internship placement site and ensuring they will have access to a licensed clinical supervisor. Of the 600 total hours, students must complete 240 hours of direct client contact (an average of 60 hours per internship course) and a minimum of 24 hours of face-to-face contact with licensed clinical field supervisors (a minimum of 6 hours per internship course). The internship experience will serve to guide students in conceptualizing, planning, and implementing culturally responsive interventions.
Prerequisite: PSY570 Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY581 - Counseling Internship 2
Course Description
This is the second course in a sequence of four clinical internship courses during which students fulfill 600 total required contact hours in a mental health counseling setting. Students are responsible for securing their internship placement site and ensuring they will have access to a clinical supervisor. Of the 600 total hours, students must complete 240 hours of direct client contact (an average of 60 hours per internship course) and a minimum of 24 hours of face-to-face contact with licensed clinical field supervisors (a minimum of 6 hours per internship course). The internship experience will serve to guide students in conceptualizing, planning, and implementing culturally responsive interventions.
Prerequisite: PSY580 Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY585 - Counseling Clinical Internship 3
Course Description
This is the third course in a sequence of four clinical internship courses during which students fulfill 600 total required contact hours in a mental health counseling setting. Students are responsible for securing their internship placement site and ensuring they will have access to a licensed clinical supervisor. Of the 600 total internship hours, students must complete 240 total hours of direct client contact (an average of 60 per internship course) and a minimum of 24 hours of face-to-face contact with licensed clinical field supervisors (a minimum of 6 hours per internship course). The internship experience will serve to guide students in conceptualizing, planning, and implementing culturally responsive interventions.
Prerequisite: PSY581 Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY586 - Counseling Clinical Internship 4
Course Description
This is the fourth course in a sequence of four clinical internship courses during which students fulfill 600 total required contact hours (150 hours per 8-week course) in a mental health counseling setting. Students are responsible for securing their internship placement site and ensuring they will have access to a licensed clinical supervisor that is either a licensed mental health professional or a doctoral intern or postdoctoral psychology fellow who is supervised by a licensed mental health professional at the internship site. Of the 600 total hours, students must complete 240 hours of direct client contact (an average of 60 hours per internship course) and a minimum of 24 hours of face-to-face contact with licensed clinical field supervisors (a minimum of 6 hours per internship course). The internship experience will serve to guide students in conceptualizing, planning, and implementing culturally responsive interventions.
Prerequisite: PSY585 Credit Hours: 3

 

PSY590 - Diagnosis and Psychopathology
Course Description
This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning using the DSM-5-TR. Additional attention will be provided to predisposing factors, etiology, social & cultural factors, differential diagnosis, clinical decision-making, and scientific research all related to emotional and behavioral disorders across the lifespan. Additionally, students will develop interviewing skills to assist in effectively and efficiently gathering diagnostic information.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Public Management

 

PMG300 - Public Administration
Course Description
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the major public administration theories influencing the discipline, the role of the public bureaucracy in American society, and the interplay of politics and public administration at the national, state, and local government levels in addition to nonprofit organizations. To successfully implement policy, public administrators need to employ a variety of knowledge and skills. To that end, public administration will be examined through multiple lenses, including ethics, social justice and diversity, organization theory and behavior, public policy formation, public management, administrative reform, intergovernmental relations, and leadership.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PMG320 - Principles of Public Policy
Course Description
This course introduces students to a wide range of topics important to understanding the field of public policy globally. This course brings together ideas from history, political science, communication, sociology, human services, and economics to address an important question: How have governmental associations and non-profit organizations come to shape and implement public policy to address global needs? Students will have the opportunity to evaluate current policies that address the most significant domestic and global social and public issues of today and students will also create a public policy to address a social or public issue that is of interest to them.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PMG370 - Fundraising and Grant Writing
Course Description
This course provides a broad overview of theoretical and practical application of nonprofit management. Students will learn about the role and responsibilities of a nonprofit organization fundraising marketing and communication plan. An overview of fundraising will include the importance of an analysis of the essential elements of fundraising: major gift solicitation, the annual campaign, planned giving, understanding alternative fundraising solutions, social enterprises, the use of new technologies for fundraising; individual donor tracking, institutional donors, charitable trusts and foundations and corporate philanthropy. Additionally, students will develop essential research skills, fundraising resources, professional associations and conferences, and examining and measuring the social impact and ethical aspects of fundraising.
Credit Hours: 3

 

PMG430 - Human Resource Management in the Public Sector
Course Description
This course provides a comprehensive overview of human resource management applications, theories, and functions in today’s public sector for both nonprofit and government jobs. Students will analyze the overall structure of HR Departments and how Human Resource Management in the Public Sector addresses issues of diverse recruitment, compensation and benefits, training, employee relations, and the incorporation of policies focusing on diversity and equity.
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Research

 

RES500 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Analysis
Course Description
In this course, students explore four major components of research for graduate program: business research and descriptive statistics, fundamentals of accounting analysis, fundamentals of financial analysis, and decision making through statistical and logical methods.  Students use quantitative methods in the course support of their research methodologies.  Students gain basic knowledge of research methodologies that supports the intensive learning that will occur in the core courses of their programs. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

RES501 - Fundamentals of Research and Writing
Course Description
The primary purpose of this course is to help students entering graduate level programs at CSU Global develop awareness of current and effective research and writing practices with the goal of implementing such practices into their writing and research projects. Students will learn what constitutes graduate level writing and research as well as how to communicate with colleagues in online professional forums. Students will also learn to effectively integrate writing and research skills into the writing projects they will pursue throughout their graduate level programs. 
Credit Hours: 3

 

RES510 - Fundamentals of Research and Writing
Course Description
The primary purpose of this course is to help students entering graduate level programs at CSU Global develop awareness of current and effective research and writing practices with the goal of implementing such practices into their writing and research projects. Students will learn what constitutes graduate level writing and research as well as how to communicate with colleagues in online professional forums. Students will also learn to effectively integrate writing and research skills into the writing projects they will pursue throughout their graduate level programs. Please Note: This course is only open to students enrolled in the Masters of Science Military and Emergency Responder Psychology Program.  
Credit Hours: 3

 

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Sociology

 

SOC101 - Introduction to Sociology
Course Description
This introductory course presents sociology as a discipline and a perspective to be used for understanding the link between individuals and society. The course allows for critical evaluation of several important social issues, including the persistence of social and socioeconomic inequalities, the continuing significance of race, gender, class, family life, socialization, the economy, political structures, social interaction, and culture. Students will gain a subjective and objective understanding of the field of sociology through the review of historical information, research methods, theoretical perspectives, and effects of socialization. Ultimately, this course provides students the opportunity to develop critical thinking abilities about the way individuals operate within society. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement. This course is an approved gtPathways course (GT-SS3) for Colorado and surrounding states.
Credit Hours: 3

 

SOC300 - Working in Modern Society
Course Description
An analysis of the conditions and challenges faced by workers in contemporary society, including the meeting of both employer and individual expectations. Focus includes the balancing of numerous factors including personal life, job commitment, and career management. This course fulfills a general education requirement for social sciences.  
Credit Hours: 3

 

SOC305 - Digital Technology and Tools for Human Services
Course Description
This course explores the influence of digital technology and tools in Human Service organizations through a review of scientific and technological developments. We examine theories of the technology-society relationship and seek to explain the underlying effects of ethics, social interaction and relationships, and economics in technological innovation. We review the growing number of technological tools available to meet organizational demands of Human Services and examine the consequences related to organizational structure, environment, health, work, and communication. Exploring selection, implementation, change management, and the role of leadership while learning to develop applicable strategies to meet organizational needs, you will learn to analyze issues that leaders must consider in technology implementations to engage stakeholders and high-level decision-makers.
Credit Hours: 3

 

SOC310 - Intersections of Race, Class, and Gender
Course Description
This course provides a survey of historical and current issues related to race, class, and gender in society. The course includes a review of judicial, political, and economic influences on organizational diversity management which affect marginalized groups from a sociological perspective. This course fulfills a CSUG General Education Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement.
Credit Hours: 3

 

SOC460 - Community Development
Course Description
In this course, students examine urban and rural community development elements with particular attention placed on planning, zoning, land use, asset-based development, community issues, housing, community-based organizations, and globalization. Topics covered in the course are designed to prepare students for careers in community development-oriented human services organizations.